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Author Topic: White Pine or Bristlecone Pine?  (Read 1184 times)
Lee Brindley
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« on: January 16, 2013, 04:43 PM »

Hi to the forum.
I have just joined here and it seems that most (all?) other folks here are from the US. I am from the UK and I have a question that may well be best answered by the American bonsai community. I recently accquired a tree that was sold as a 'White Pine' by a local bonsai nursery. The tree has white, sappy deposits on the needles which I originally thought to be caused by some kind of pest infestation. I asked about it on another forum and was told by one person that the tree was a Bristlecone Pine and that the white deposits were normal for this species. So far I have been unable to get a second oppinion from anybody, so hope that somebody here will be able to tell from this photo.
Many thanks, Lee.
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Dan W.
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« Reply #1 on: January 17, 2013, 12:22 AM »

The sap deposits are definitely a characteristic of the Rocky Mountain Bristlecone - p. aristata. (Great Basin Bristlecone doesn't have this characteristic and I don't think Foxtail does either.) I don't know if there are any JWP's that do this...? Maybe Owen or someone over there can find out. Smiley

I wish I could answer your question for certain but it's hard to do from a photo. I will say that it looks very much like a Bristlecone though. I have two, and the picture looks more like Bristlecone than JWP to me.

It's interesting how it ended up over there if it is a Bristlecone. Is there any way to track down the grower or importer?
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Dan W.
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« Reply #2 on: January 17, 2013, 12:23 AM »

Welcome to the forum by the way Lee! Smiley

Dan
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Lee Brindley
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« Reply #3 on: January 18, 2013, 12:36 PM »

Thanks Dan.
The fact that it is here in the UK was also a reason for me to be sceptical of it being a bristlecone. I have never seen or heard of one here before. The fact that it is un-grafted however, seems to make it more likely not to be parviflora.  Undecided
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geoffhobson
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« Reply #4 on: January 18, 2013, 02:34 PM »

Lee,
where are you in uk? I also have never heard of anyone with the species you mention, I am not sure what it could be.
I get the deposit like you on some of my pines, particularly scots, it does not seem to do any harm,
Geoff
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Lee Brindley
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« Reply #5 on: January 18, 2013, 02:54 PM »

Hi Geoff. I am in Cheshire - the tree came from a small nursery in Warrington. I will see if they have any idea where the tree came from next time I go. As it is a five-needle pine, I do not know of any other species it could be.  Huh?
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Dan W.
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« Reply #6 on: January 18, 2013, 11:22 PM »

Lee, I have bought seed for both P. Parviflora and P. Aristata on ebay... someone probably could have done the same thing years ago and sold the tree to the nursery... my best guess anyway.
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Minogame
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« Reply #7 on: January 19, 2013, 01:22 PM »

The picture looks to me to be a white pine. The needles appear thin. Look at http://bonsaitonight.com/2009/10/09/bristlecone-pine/
I would check for needle scale insects. Perhaps take it to your local nursery for confirmation.
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Dan W.
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« Reply #8 on: January 19, 2013, 03:14 PM »

Here is a bristlecone... the Rocky Mt. version can have very light needles as well. I'm not sure how different the needle characteristics are on the Great Basin Bristlecone in your link. If I get a chance I'll take some close-up's of my bristlecone needles for comparison. I'm not ruling out JWP, but I don't think we can rule out p. Aristata yet either. -- He said they were sap deposits, so that sould rule out scale.  

This one was at the show in Denver last year. The needles were very short and light.- I would say half the length of needles on a tree that hasn't been worked.


[attachment deleted by admin - remove the single quote and try again.  sorry for the trouble, it's a known issue with the software.]

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Dan W.
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« Reply #9 on: January 19, 2013, 05:25 PM »

Thanks, here it is again...
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