Author Topic: white pine care  (Read 23582 times)

Herman

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Re: white pine care
« Reply #30 on: February 06, 2014, 08:36 AM »


Thank you for the reply Owen, much appreciated. I will follow your advice and re-pot this tree first thing in spring just before the buds start to move, I think the tree has shown that it will be able to go through winter with my current watering regime

haha, what is your perception of the weather in South Africa? There is great variation...

The region I live in, can be called temperate rather than tropical or sub-tropical,  and my weather campares very closely to Aichien’s avg temperatures(aka Nagoya Japan), except they have it more humid in summer, and it gets colder by me in winter. same for the Saitama district, and Omiya, where many excelent japanese white pines come from

aka I did my homework before I bought the tree, as it was very expensive...

Regards
Herman
 

Owen Reich

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Re: white pine care
« Reply #31 on: February 06, 2014, 08:55 PM »
Good to know.  My knowledge of South Africa is limited to the desert species native to there and Namibia.  It will be interesting to see how it fares.
 

Herman

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Re: white pine care
« Reply #32 on: February 07, 2014, 01:55 AM »
Hi Owen,

talking about the thorn trees I suppose, I will be starting some new threads soon about some indigenous trees I'm working on, maybe you can chime in there too. Don't know if those threads will enjoy much attention, because there won't be much relevance to posting species most of the people on here will never see, let alone work on...

This is why i have only posted species relevant to this forum,

I will keep this thread updated.

regards
Herman
 

Owen Reich

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Re: white pine care
« Reply #33 on: February 07, 2014, 10:10 PM »
Please post stuff from down there.  Everyone should post more including me.  I was referring mainly to the desert flowering plants; Scilla natalensis and the like.  Did my senior thesis on that one.  Only problem is it's poisonous as hell to animals.....
 

Herman

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Re: white pine care
« Reply #34 on: February 10, 2014, 09:30 AM »
okay, will do Owen :)
I've got quite a few thorn trees that i can post ;D

on a side note:

you are speaking of the "blou slangkop", it's our common name for this plant. I've only ever seen the white one; had to dig them out of the "veld" on my grandfathers farm(ranch), since he was buying in cattle from a region without these and the new cattle, not knowing to avoid these, would eat them and become poisoned. Cattle die within three days of eating this plant...looks really painfull.. ps direct translation of the name to english is "blue snake head", it refers to how the whole flower resembles a snake's head before the individual flowers open up.

regards
Herman
 

Herman

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Re: white pine care
« Reply #35 on: March 26, 2014, 03:47 AM »
so now the terminal buds have new green buds forming from their tips. on some terminal buds there are four new buds! and even more back buds are forming, it looks like it is slowing down a bit as the night time temps are starting to dive and the deciduous trees in the garden are just starting to paint their leaves yellow and red ;D this should mean that the tree has recovered fast from the mal treatment it received at the nursery i bought it from. I think these new buds will have ample time to mature before winter fully kicks in. it looks exactly the same, so no photo  :P

best regards
Herman
 

Adair M

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Re: white pine care
« Reply #36 on: March 27, 2014, 07:44 AM »
Next year, those terminal tips that have four buds will need to be reduced to two.
 

Gaffer

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Re: white pine care
« Reply #37 on: March 27, 2014, 08:40 PM »
A little change in direction.
White pine seedlings. Are they treated the same as black pine seedlings in that is the seedling root cropped. I have three up already along with about seven reds. Are blacks always slower or has some bug got in. I have none up so far. All planted in the same seed bed, same situation .
A little help
Thank you
Qualicum Brian
 

Herman

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Re: white pine care
« Reply #38 on: March 28, 2014, 01:56 AM »
Next year, those terminal tips that have four buds will need to be reduced to two.

Next spring or next fall? thanks for the tip, will do it

regards
Herman
 

Adair M

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Re: white pine care
« Reply #39 on: March 28, 2014, 10:09 AM »
Herman,

Are they just buds?  Tight little nubs that will become candles?  Or have they grown and have needles?  If just buds, leave them be for now.  Wait 'till late spring or summer so you see what's growing, and what direction you want the branch to grow, or wire it out to, and pick twigs accordingly.

Remember with white pine, you only get one flush of growth per year.  No decandling.  Usually, we only get one or two active tips to work with, so if you have a choice, that's great!

Very often, with white pine, there's no need to pinch the candles back, because they grow so slowly.  Sometimes, you may get really strong candles that overgrow the design, so you can pinch those back before they've hardened off.   We call that 'candle breaking'.  Be sure to leave needles on any pinched candle.

Fertilizer?  Usually not in the spring.  Wait until the candles and needles have hardened off in early summer.  Then start to apply fertilizer.  This keeps the tufts of needles tight.  Fertilizing too soon causes the twigs to get 'leggy'.  (Unless you are really pushing for growth.  If you are, then fertilize in spring to encourage as much growth as possible.)
 

Herman

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Re: white pine care
« Reply #40 on: March 31, 2014, 02:28 AM »
Theyre just buds Adair, I will take a pic for you, so you can see what I'm talking about. no new needles, just a lot of new buds forming on the tips of mature buds(buds that will grow into candles then shoots next spring). I think these mature buds were already mature when i bought the tree. they havent pushed needles at all, just formed a set of new buds from their tips. these new buds havent pushed into candles either. I think this is because of the timing difference of the seasons between China and South Africa. Because the tree now had an extended growing season it set another round of buds that will start elongating into candles this coming spring. Ive seen black pines do it here in the fall as well

I bought myself the master pine book last year, for the jbp section. Since I bought this tree I've been studying the jwp section as well

regards
Herman
 

Adair M

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Re: white pine care
« Reply #41 on: March 31, 2014, 11:37 AM »
Then there's nothing to do until they sprout next spring.

If the tree is strong you can wire and style in the late fall.  Perhaps cut off old needles, keeping this year's.  We don't pull needles on JWP.  Cut them off super short, and the nubs will fall off.  Often the old needles will yellow, start to brown, and they just fall off with a gentle touch.  That's ok, too.
 

Herman

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Re: white pine care
« Reply #42 on: April 01, 2014, 03:11 AM »
I see two potential pitfalls

1: I don't know when this tree was potted up or repotted last. so I don't know in what condition the roots are in, to repot this coming spring may be a gamble if it was dug up and potted up or repotted last year in china.
2: The soil it is in is holding way too much water, I was watering it once every 4 days in the middle of summer, and I'm watering it once a week now in early autumn

I really want to get it out of the mix it is in atm, so I consulted a pro, and he told me to leave it be for one full growing season, just pinching overly long candles shorter, and watching the water, also giving it a low nitrogen fertilizer now and next autumn will help the roots. spring after i can repot it by bare rooting half the rootball. will prob style it for the first time that following autumn, its a three year plan :o

I think the long term plan will be better for the health of the tree? I really want to get in there and style it, but Im cautious of losing this tree

thanks for the advice Adair, always appreciated


regards
Herman
 

Adair M

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Re: white pine care
« Reply #43 on: April 29, 2014, 08:53 AM »
Herman,

I agree with the long term plan.  My experience with JWP is they are more delicate than JBP, so taking the conservative rather than aggressive approach is appropriate.

I hope you're doing well.

Adair
 

Herman

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Re: white pine care
« Reply #44 on: April 29, 2014, 09:26 AM »
Hi Adair :)

I'm Awesome except for our dreaded national elections coming up...people tend to behave in a primal fashion during these...and its a bit stressfull with the landlord not fixing my front gate...not much sleep for me until the commotion blows over :-\

I'm ITCHING to wire this pine, but I know it will be better to be conservative  :-X. I can report that all the backbuds has stopped growing and took on a nice red brownish hue, guess this means they have matured and will push out into candles this coming spring. Let's hope it gets all the rest it needs(dormancy). will have a place under 30% shade next summer so it can get out of the heat, I may have to trim the apex a bit, it seems very dense and strong compared to the rest of the tree. can i maybe cut some needles on top to thin it out and reduce vigor?

hope you fare well too :)

best regards
Herman