Author Topic: Growing JWP from seed??  (Read 2749 times)

Kajukid

  • Full Forum Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 226
Growing JWP from seed??
« on: October 02, 2011, 11:51 AM »
Has anyone done this? And can you grow them with the same process As a JBP??
 

John Kirby

  • Hero Forum Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2216
  • Thanked: 16 times
  • I really need an opposable thumb...
Re: Growing JWP from seed??
« Reply #1 on: October 02, 2011, 12:26 PM »
Yes, and,  No. They grow much more slowly than JBP and are much less vigorous, especially in warm climates. This is why most of the commercially reared JWP are grafts, for speed of growth, hardiness in a landscape,  as well as for the unique foliage and growth attributes of specific witches brooms or individual trees. Some, like zuisho, can be started from cuttings and/or air layers from larger trees.
 

Jerry Norbury

  • Sr. Forum Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 321
  • Thanked: 1 times
Re: Growing JWP from seed??
« Reply #2 on: October 02, 2011, 02:12 PM »
I say avoid even trying to grow from seed - regardless of the species.
Unless you really know what you are doing, it is a difficult and will not get you learning real bonsai techniques for years. A waste of time.
 

Alain Bertrand

  • Jr. Forum Member
  • **
  • Posts: 67
  • Thanked: 1 times
Re: Growing JWP from seed??
« Reply #3 on: October 03, 2011, 10:26 AM »
Unless you really know what you are doing, it is a difficult and will not get you learning real bonsai techniques for years.
I agree.
Quote
A waste of time.
Let me disagree.  It is very rewarding. If you browse further here, you'll see quite a few nice trees that members of this forum grown from seed. In ten years, dedicated people without previous experience can grow good material to work on, material that would cost at least a few hundred euros.
 

tanlu

  • Jr. Forum Member
  • **
  • Posts: 86
Re: Growing JWP from seed??
« Reply #4 on: October 05, 2011, 01:51 AM »
I agree with Alain. It's definitely not for the impatient, but is worth the effort and a whole new way of appreciating bonsai. All my JWP are from seed, and this year I sprouted over 20 JWP from seeds imported from Japan and from seeds I collected from JWP growing in my yard. The ones that were imported all sprouted this spring, but died after a few months because I accidentally left them overexposed to direct sunlight. Next time I'll know better to leave them in full shade when I'm out of town. I still have one seedling left that sprouted the previous year. It's doing very well, and its candles are already swelling in prep for next spring's explosion of growth.

Although many bonsaiists want to preserve the genetic uniqueness of certain cultivars, I find the genetic diversity amongst JWP seedlings fun and fascinating. I have 4 JWP seedlings I purchased from Julian Adams, and 2 of them have roughly 3 more years to go before they can be planted in a bonsai pot for shohin. One of them has a distinctly short silver-blue needles, while another one has even shorter emerald needles. Some seedlings are more vigorous than others. If you take the correct measures, you can have pretty decent JWP bonsai in 10 to 12 years from seed (not that long in bonsai time). I have a 9 y/o with already a 1.5" trunk and flaking bark. It was root bound then I purchased it in it's tiny 5" nursery pot. If it had been grown in a colander from age 4, I believe it would have been ready for a bonsai pot by now.
 

Kajukid

  • Full Forum Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 226
Re: Growing JWP from seed??
« Reply #5 on: October 11, 2011, 06:26 PM »
well i want to grow them from seeds...i think it will be fun...soooooo....my next question is,...has anyone grown them from seeds? how did you do it??? what was the steps you did?? i've been look all over the internet and cant find anythin... if you guys can help me that would be great....thank

-Justin..
 

John Kirby

  • Hero Forum Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2216
  • Thanked: 16 times
  • I really need an opposable thumb...
Re: Growing JWP from seed??
« Reply #6 on: October 11, 2011, 07:20 PM »
As I said, yes I have grown from seed, no the JBP technique was not applied- they really are a lot slower than the JBP. try it on a few, see if it works, it may work like a charm for you. There is a thread here on Growing Mikawa JBP from seed, very detailed, very good, gives pictures and technique (it is a rehash o the early Bonsai Today articles, but is really good as is the JBP from Seed blogs by Jonas Dupuich (who lives near Oakland and is in BIB) at www.bonsaitonight.com. It is all there and in pictures.....

John
 

Kajukid

  • Full Forum Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 226
Re: Growing JWP from seed??
« Reply #7 on: October 11, 2011, 07:56 PM »
okay thanks john...but i was wondering do i have to Stratification the seeds? its says to warm Stratify for 60 days and cold Stratify for 90 days...i know what cold stratify is but what and how do i warm stratify the seeds??
 

John Kirby

  • Hero Forum Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2216
  • Thanked: 16 times
  • I really need an opposable thumb...
Re: Growing JWP from seed??
« Reply #8 on: October 11, 2011, 08:18 PM »
Place the seeds in Damp vermiculite and set them on top of the fridge, then move into the fridge for cold stratification. Or, if you have a sheltered place, sow them outside and let them sprout naturally.
 

tanlu

  • Jr. Forum Member
  • **
  • Posts: 86
Re: Growing JWP from seed??
« Reply #9 on: October 12, 2011, 12:25 AM »
Kajukid,

Perhaps you misread my comment. I did grow them from seed. I got the seeds from Julian Adams in March and planted them immediately. They all sprouted, but dried out and died due to over exposure to direct sunlight. I left a few seeds outside over the winter and they sprouted naturally underneath the protection of the JWP forest planting I have in the yard. I found that growing them in diffused sunlight for the first year is best. I transplanted two of the sprouts and they've responded very well.

If you didn't already, keep the seeds in warm-hot water for at least 24 hours. Then put them in a ziplock bag in the refrigerator for 90 days. Plant them in regular inorganic bonsai soil, and they should sprout around mid May. This is what Julian Adams does and he's definitely an authority on growing JWP from seed. Check out his website: adamsbonsai.com and contact him. He's been growing his own bonsai (many from seed/cuttings) for over 30 years and he's a great guy.
 

Kajukid

  • Full Forum Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 226
Re: Growing JWP from seed??
« Reply #10 on: October 12, 2011, 12:46 AM »
Kajukid,

Perhaps you misread my comment. I did grow them from seed. I got the seeds from Julian Adams in March and planted them immediately. They all sprouted, but dried out and died due to over exposure to direct sunlight. I left a few seeds outside over the winter and they sprouted naturally underneath the protection of the JWP forest planting I have in the yard. I found that growing them in diffused sunlight for the first year is best. I transplanted two of the sprouts and they've responded very well.

If you didn't already, keep the seeds in warm-hot water for at least 24 hours. Then put them in a ziplock bag in the refrigerator for 90 days. Plant them in regular inorganic bonsai soil, and they should sprout around mid May. This is what Julian Adams does and he's definitely an authority on growing JWP from seed. Check out his website: adamsbonsai.com and contact him. He's been growing his own bonsai (many from seed/cuttings) for over 30 years and he's a great guy.
so your saying i dont need to go the warm stratify?? and thank you..
 

John Kirby

  • Hero Forum Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2216
  • Thanked: 16 times
  • I really need an opposable thumb...
Re: Growing JWP from seed??
« Reply #11 on: October 12, 2011, 07:41 AM »
It is not that complicated, really. If you want force them, warm and then cold stratification, or, if you are willing to let nature do it's work, place them in trays/pots outside for the winter (protected) and they will sprout in the spring. As with all tree seedlings, it is good to give them filtered light while they get their root systems established, then gradually move them out in to full sun as they get established.

Julian does have a nice website and is an interesting and helpful person.

John