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Author Topic: Native Rocky Mountain white pines...aonyone working with?  (Read 2119 times)
Dan W.
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« on: October 14, 2012, 03:26 PM »

I'm curious whether anyone else out there is working with Native five needle pines...? Specifically the Rocky Mountain versions, sutch as Limber, Bristlecone, White Bark... etc.

I have found a few via Google... Jerry Meiselik and Scot Elser showed up with Limber's, and there was one Bristlecone displayed at the ABS/BCI show in Denver.

I can't find anyone else sharing their work with these pines on forums or blogs... and would love to see anyones work.

Are there any significant reasons why these pines aren't used as much?

I have been collecting a few; here is my favorite (it's big!):

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Owen Reich
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« Reply #1 on: October 14, 2012, 10:42 PM »

Helps if you have trees that nice  Grin.  I've seen some online.  I think they were either owned or styled by one of the Portland pros; Neil or Hagedorn.  Thinking the latter though.  I hope to see more in shows.  One issue may be "springy" branches that don't hold after wiring.  Just a thought as I've never had any bigger than seedlings for Bristle Cone.  Had a lodge pole pine I collected near Mt. Hood, but a sawfly larvae defoliated it and killed it in a matter of hours.

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augustine
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« Reply #2 on: October 15, 2012, 10:09 AM »

Greetings to all,

Recently rec'd a Southwestern White Pine, Pinus Strobiformis, from Brent at Evergreen. Liked the catalog description and very pleased with the plant. Beautiful needle color and extremely well grown, buds and branches everywhere (and low where they count the most).

Live in the Chesapeake Bay region so the tree is a bit out of it's element. I'll have to see what I can do but it has potential. Needles are long, and will stay on the long side per Brent, so this will be a larger tree. The branches are very soft, much wiring will be necessary.

I'd be interested in anyone's experience with this species.

Best regards,

Raymond
Pasadena, (Central) MD - zone 7A
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Dan W.
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« Reply #3 on: October 15, 2012, 12:43 PM »

Thanks Owen,

I start in Feb., with Michael Hagedorn's seasonals; I'll have to ask him. Do you like your bristlecone seedlings? & Bummer about the lodgepole.

Raymond, good luck with yours. And be sure to share the progress.
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cbobgo
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« Reply #4 on: October 15, 2012, 01:57 PM »

I have a limber pine that I got from Oregon Bonsai 5 years ago.  It does not seem to be enjoying my sunny California weather as much as I would like, but it is still alive.  I have not done much with it yet, so can't really give you any advice.

- bob
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Yenling83
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« Reply #5 on: October 15, 2012, 03:42 PM »

Nice tree, these are great for bonsai.  I think there are lots of native material we just have not explored enough yet.  I think it would just take one person who has some really nice one's to eventually make them popular.  I've collected in areas with native white pine, but I always end up collecting junipers because I find them  more frequently growing in granite pockets where you can get a good root ball.  For whatever reasons, I don't seem to find nice white pines growing in these pockets.   
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John Kirby
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« Reply #6 on: October 15, 2012, 05:54 PM »

Shore Pine=Lodgepole, Limber, Southwester White Pine, Short Needle Pine, Viginia Pine, etc. All work, the issues are associated with cultural issues.
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Dan W.
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« Reply #7 on: October 15, 2012, 08:28 PM »

Yenling, I have a few nice limbers, and many more I plan on collecting in the future (all growing in granite pockets). I will be offering some for sale starting next year.
Hopefully we can get some good ones into artists hands and into shows down the road. -- My business partner has some very nice ones as well.
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Owen Reich
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« Reply #8 on: October 16, 2012, 07:01 AM »

Dan, the Bristlecones may or may not be alive.  I put them in the care of a friend 2 years ago and they are sensitive to over-watering.  They were germinated 5 years ago and always grew well in Nashville.  You may have a potential client in the near future  Grin.  I'd love to see some photos of the WY yamadori.  I've visited the area a few times.  Beautiful.

The loss of that Lodgepole was tragic.  But I guess everyone will benefit for watching out for Sawfly larvae; aka demon caterpillar that eats pine needles.....

Thanks.
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Chrisl
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« Reply #9 on: October 16, 2012, 10:08 AM »

I'd love a lodgepole yamadori too Dan!  Grin  Be sure to let me know if/when you get your hands on some!

I'd never heard of sawfly larvae before, thanks for the education...and bummer about the tree!
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Dan W.
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« Reply #10 on: October 16, 2012, 01:44 PM »

Thanks guys. I'll be sure to let you know when I start getting trees posted for sale. I'll see what I can do about a WY Yamadori thread as well.
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Dan W.
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« Reply #11 on: January 17, 2013, 12:59 AM »

This is the one of only a very few Bristlecone bonsai I've ever seen... The ONLY Yamadori Bristlecone bonsai I've seen.
(Also a test to see if I can upload a picture from the ipad...)(if not I'll do it again later)

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augustine
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« Reply #12 on: July 18, 2013, 09:18 AM »

I have an update on my Pinus strobiformis.

My pine was fed and watered too much. New needles are long. I know that the food and water should be minimized early in the season, on white pines, to prevent long needles but I thought vigorous growth was called for since tree is in development. Live and learn.

Anyway the tree has quite a way to go so I'll adjust the culture in future years. I was happy to see quite a bit of backbudding with lots close to the trunk.

On the other hand, I have a small JWP that responded quite well to similar culture.

Greatly enjoying the learning process which has accelerated by joining a bonsai club.

Best,

Augustine
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Dan W.
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« Reply #13 on: December 10, 2013, 12:58 PM »

Thanks for the update Augustine. Pictures are always welcome  Wink
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augustine
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« Reply #14 on: December 11, 2013, 11:17 AM »

Dan,

I will post a picture soon but have add'l info.

I rec'd the plant in September 2012 and live in the very humid Chesapeake Bay region. Brent stated that he did not know how it would do in a humid area and I asked this group for opinions and rec'd some info from John Kirby to contact my cooperative extension service. They were not able to give specifics and referred me to the National Arboretum's Bonsai Collection. I'm lucky because I get to see Jack Sustic, the Curator, from time to time on the local bonsai scene. Jack suggested use of general fungicides on a regular basis.

Anyway approx 2 months after receipt the plant did develop some needle fungus which was treated with lime sulphur during the cold season, daconil in the spring with monthly treatments. The new foliage has not been affected by fungus. So far so good.

I wonder how a Limber Pine would do here? (The local nurseries sell the Vanderwolf cultivar.)

I've enjoy your blog and your trees are beautiful. Thanks for your interest.

Happy Holidays to all!

Augustine
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