Bonsai Study Group Forum

Species Specific => White Pine Bonsai Discussion => Topic started by: John Kirby on August 10, 2011, 09:59 PM

Title: Kokonoe White Pine
Post by: John Kirby on August 10, 2011, 09:59 PM
Every once in a while you run into a tree with a story. This tree is about 3' or so tall, it is planted in a large grey pot (Tokoname) and is actually a significantly large tree. It is an imported Kokonoe JWP that was originally grafted on to JBP roots. The tree was potted quite deep and eventually it was "ground layered" (something that Zuisho and Kokonoe are known to do). Over the years the Kokonoe roots have taken over and the JBP roots have eventually been removed, so it is now essentially on its own roots and no graft is visible (it was buried and then removed). This tree is somewhere between 60 and 70 years old, it was shown in the Taikan-ten show  (Show book number 20 it is on page 107) about 10 years ago. After the show Mr. Kamiya let Boon know that it was available and it was subsequently imported to the US and has been in California since then. The tree was offered up for sale this year and I was able to acquire it, it was quite strong (well cared for) and suitable for a late summer styling. Fortunately, Akio Kondo (who had originally worked to get Boon an apprenticeship in Japan) was visiting Boon and agreed to take on restyling this tree.

The tree took three days of work, and is shown as it was as acquired, after 1 day of work, after two days of work, with Akio adjusting from the side and the finished restyling. It is expected that this tree will pop back strongly from this work and after a subsequent styling will be able to be shown in 2014 or 15.

Thanks for reading. John
Title: Re: Kokonoe White Pine
Post by: John Kirby on August 10, 2011, 10:00 PM
And the action pictures.....
Title: Re: Kokonoe White Pine
Post by: Dave Murphy on August 11, 2011, 07:27 AM
Beautiful tree, John...truly world class.  Will this tree stay at Boons, or come home?
Title: Re: Kokonoe White Pine
Post by: John Kirby on August 11, 2011, 07:38 AM
Dave, thanks. The tree will stay at Boon's at least until it has been further developed and shown at the BIB show. Lot's of work has yet to be done, we will see how it progresses. John
Title: Re: Kokonoe White Pine
Post by: mcpesq817 on August 11, 2011, 09:34 AM
Wow John, this is an absolutely fantastic tree.  If this was the only tree in my collection, I would be a very happy man :)
Title: Re: Kokonoe White Pine
Post by: Chrisl on August 11, 2011, 10:00 AM
What a transformation!  Incredible!

John, I'm curious, how often does this happen that one buys a tree, and has a 'pro' do the restyling?  A tree this old, I'd do the same.  But as I'm totally new to buying 70 yr old trees...ok I haven't yet lol...I'm just wondering the process of/thoughts behind having a pro do the styling?
Title: Re: Kokonoe White Pine
Post by: Don Blackmond on August 11, 2011, 10:56 AM
excellent work by Akio and great tree John.
I love the bark and symmetry.  Great scale too.
Five stars.
Title: Re: Kokonoe White Pine
Post by: John Kirby on August 11, 2011, 11:14 AM
Chris, I guess I don't understand what you are asking. The tree was styled many times over the years, it has been styled by professionals on most if not all of those times. Trees like this can be improved dramatically by someone who has experience working on similar trees. If I had attempted this work, it would have been at least a week and would have been too conservative. Akio took off branches that I would have left (incorrectly) for the long term health and development of this tree. In the US, there is an often held opinion that only the owner of a tree should work on it, that if one doesn't do all the work on a tree that it isn't "theirs" and should somehow be of lesser value. I have a large number of trees that I do all the wok on and nobody else works on them (yet), however, if possible,  high end trees can often benefit dramatically from the assistance of a professional. Unlike an Automobile, this tree should gain value over the next several years and getting tune ups from a professional can dramatically help.

In Japan the professionals typically don't own the very best trees, they are owned by their clients, some of whom leave their trees at the master's nursery, others have the professional travel to their home. I was very fortunate in that Akio, a professional who has had trees win at Kokufu and has had at least one tree in the top pair at Sakufu-ten, was vacationing in the US and willing to take some time and work on this tree. Trees like this are investments and deserve the very best that they can get. When I show this tree its history will accompany it, it has been styled by a number of fine folks- the late Mr. Kamiya, Boon and Tom Kelly, and Akio (plus those I can never know). When this tree moves on to its next home (they do tend to outlive us) itis my goal that it will be improved even more and will make a good return on my investment.

Hope this makes sense,
John
Title: Re: Kokonoe White Pine
Post by: John Kirby on August 11, 2011, 11:24 AM
Don, thanks. The bark, scale and fact that it was a twin trunk and not another moyogi (nothing against Moyogi, I have too many) made taking the step of acquiring this tree a little easier.
Title: Re: Kokonoe White Pine
Post by: tanlu on August 11, 2011, 01:51 PM
This tree is excellent, and I especially love the story behind it! I'm personally not a fan of grafted five needle pines, but the fact that this one has been naturally ground-layered makes it a much more unique and interesting tree (at least in my book). Does Kokonoe respond to pruning and candle pinching the same way as Zuisho? I find my Zuisho to be far more responsive in back budding than my five needle pine seedlings.
Title: Re: Kokonoe White Pine
Post by: John Kirby on August 11, 2011, 04:12 PM
Kokonoe acts a lot like zuisho, White pines bud back well, not sure why you see differences. Wait 30-40 years you will get good bark too.
Title: Re: Kokonoe White Pine
Post by: Yenling83 on August 11, 2011, 06:14 PM
John Congrats on this Tree!  Glad to hear you are the owner.
Title: Re: Kokonoe White Pine
Post by: John Kirby on August 11, 2011, 10:43 PM
Jeremiah, thanks. Was a good few days. Hope allis good with you.
Title: Re: Kokonoe White Pine
Post by: akeppler on August 12, 2011, 12:30 AM
NIce tree John. The top looks as though it is from a different tree. The color is so strong and green while the bottom is old and weak looking. It seems that the bottom branches were developed with what the tree had to offer and the top was pruned back really hard. Will this tree develop strong new growth on those old branches?

I will be looking forward to seeing this at BIB at some time.

Al
Title: Re: Kokonoe White Pine
Post by: Owen Reich on August 12, 2011, 07:14 AM
Great restyle.  The main apex was redone especially well.  When the lower branches regain vigor after subsequent balancing it will be especially noteworthy.  As a future professional myself, the statements earlier are dead on.  Investing in quality material and enlisting a pro can allow you to have top quality trees given a great future and/or setting an old tree back on track.  Here in Japan, many high-end hobbyists are super busy or don't have the space or proper light at home to keep their trees there.  I once felt that trees should be owned and worked on by the same person to call it "theirs", but have done a 180 on this opinion.  The best trees have multiple generations of owners.  Americans' pioneering spirit and culture of self-reliance is admirable, but will hinder bonsai progression in the States to some extent.  A pro can walk up to a tree and objectively weigh the positives and negatives of a tree without emotional attachment.  A second set of trained eyes can also spot potential future problems yet to occur and "fix" them before they devalue the tree aesthetically.  Patronage of skilled professionals will only help America progress to a higher level of refinement.   ;D
Title: Re: Kokonoe White Pine
Post by: John Kirby on August 12, 2011, 07:22 AM
Al, look at the before pics, strong growth throughout, but these are apically dominant trees. I expect that the growth "will balance" over the next year or so with the top having been reduced to the best pair of buds. When you see the tree in person, you see that no part is "weak". Part of the rejuvenation (style wise) is to reduce old large branches and replace them with younger more compact ones- if you don't do this then the tree just continues to get taller and taller unless you employ the unsustainable wiring of loops and excessive bends in to your branches.. Wait a year, the foliage will become more dense so that the balance becomes apparent-  this is where the work continues for the next several years.

Title: Re: Kokonoe White Pine
Post by: John Kirby on August 12, 2011, 07:37 AM
Owen, the concept of professionals is new to the general bonsai hobbyist in the US. I hope that we will see more and more good work as the numbers of trained professionals continues to increase. Japanese trained as well as US trained over time. The quality of trees can only continue to improve. Good luck.
Title: Re: Kokonoe White Pine
Post by: Owen Reich on August 12, 2011, 08:55 AM
I agree.  If you look at Kokofu books from about 20 years ago, it gives me a great deal of hope.  Many accents were bigger than the main tree and the stands were huge!  The trees also resemble many current American trees  ;).  We can do nothing but improve.  I often show trees from American exhibitions and my sensei is impressed.  He drools over "American Shimpaku" and our pines.  We have a massive potential stock of native Yamadori to collect responsibly.  I look forward to learning from other artists from all over the world in the future.

Thanks,
Owen Reich
Title: Re: Kokonoe White Pine
Post by: Chrisl on August 12, 2011, 10:52 AM
John, both you and Owen answered my question perfectly.  I've often wondered about "is it mine if I have someone else work on it"...in fact it came up when I signed up for a workshop with Ryan O'neil at the upcoming Midwest show called "Bring Your Own Tree" workshop.  So Ryan will be helping me on my Bald Cypress, and maybe my maple as I'm not sure how much work can be done on the BC due to me hacking off all the old/wrongly grown/out of proportion branches.  Thanks to Don Blackman for teaching me how to work on these trees.  So I'll bring a 'backup' tree just in case...this is a rare chance for me to get a real pro's advice and hopefully a little work.  Ryan's work speaks for itself.

But getting back to your gorgeous pine John, I can understand your reasoning, and Akio did a fantastic job.  If it was mine, and if I could afford it ;), I would've hired him too as the tree is so old, with so much history, and a good chance of doing well in a show.  It's very interesting in these old trees to have so many famous professionals style over time.  It adds interest to the 'story' of the tree immensely.  And I'm sure you're right, a tree like this is an investment, and will outlive us.  Thanks for the perspective, I feel a bit like Owen, in that my view has now changed 180 degrees ;))  I had mixed feelings about it at first, and signing up for Ryan's workshop, but now I feel much more 'secure' in accepting help from others.....and perfect timing for me too. lol 

Thanks for a great conversation guys!  And I hope John's right, that we will embrace the consult of professionals, japanese, americans trained in Japan, and pros being taught right here by american  pros.  It's an exciting time to be in bonsai in America. 


Title: Re: Kokonoe White Pine
Post by: tanlu on August 17, 2011, 11:35 PM
Kokonoe acts a lot like zuisho, White pines bud back well, not sure why you see differences. Wait 30-40 years you will get good bark too.

Most, if not all, grafted JWP have an obvious mismatch in bark pattern at the graft union, which in my opinion, is an eye sore. I've always believed that the best JWP bonsai are either grown from seed, air layered, or yamadori. All my JWP are young seedlings or airlayered Zuisho, and they're already starting to develop flaky, cracked bark. I've noticed that many grafted cultivars tend to have smoother bark than the actual species. Besides, I don't plan on entering them in Kofuku competitions anytime soon so there's no rush. 

I'm also not opposed to grafting as a practice. Brent Waltson's JWP are all grafted, but very low where it eventually disappears in the nebari which I believe solves the the problem.
Title: Re: Kokonoe White Pine
Post by: Chrisl on August 18, 2011, 12:55 AM
I really like the idea that John's tree underwent:  Plant the graft for a ground layer...quite smart. 

And John, I am SO envious of you! ;)  I keep looking at the photos, just an awesome bonsai, both before, and after an incredible styling!  Please keep us updated...pics next spring?   
Title: Re: Kokonoe White Pine
Post by: John Kirby on August 18, 2011, 08:18 AM
Tanlu, I guess you didn't read my post. What I said was I don't understand why you see differences in budding back and that really good bark takes a long time to develop on pines. Your comment about the relative smoothness of bark on many grafted varieties is right on and they do tend to be different from the seedling JWP.  On the tree that is being discussed here, there is no graft visible above the soil, it is gone, because the tree was ground layered many years after grafting.

The mass marketed grafted JWP that we most commonly see in the US are generally obvious and frequently unattractive with both a major step down in trunk diameter above the graft and the bark mismatch. Why do we get the grafted ones? They survive importation pretty well and they are cheap (relatively) and importers can cash flow with them. However, with the long internodes frequently seen on Zuisho, a side effect of its growth habit, many of the branches are frequently grafted- often approach grafts or scions from the same tree. To get good trunk diameter and taper on field/container grown trees this is one of the costs. There is a good article on this in an old Bonsai Today (Some where in the 80-90 editions. I will look for it). Good luck growing your trees.
Title: Re: Kokonoe White Pine
Post by: rockm on August 18, 2011, 02:08 PM
I can only add my compliments on this tree. It is fantastic. I can also add that having someone else work on your trees (with you assisting or observing) can open up a wide world of possibilities that you may have never considered or have ignored.

I experienced something of a revelation when I took one of my bigger, older trees to a professional a couple of years ago. My design for it had stagnated. I couldn't really see it, until someone else pointed it out.

Other people have a way of seeing things you have overlooked, ignored or rationalized over the years in developing a tree alone. I can't tell you how many trees I've seen in exhibitions and in collections whose development stopped decades ago because the owner refused to actually see what the tree needed. Working alone with trees is working in a vacuum. Other knowlegeable people force air into dated and self-stunted designs.
Title: Re: Kokonoe White Pine
Post by: tanlu on August 18, 2011, 03:07 PM
John, I did read your post. I just assumed that "not sure why you see differences" meant the difference between grafted and non-grafted JWP, which we both seem to agree to be obvious. In my first post I was comparing Zuisho JWP to JWP seedlings based on my own experience growing them. I've never seen Kokonoe and was just wondering if it looks and reacts like Zuisho in back budding and vigor. Is Zuisho JWP's ability to propagate via cuttings their only difference?

Title: Re: Kokonoe White Pine
Post by: PaulH on August 18, 2011, 04:27 PM
I too, am not a fan of grafted white pines. This tree, however, is a whole different animal. Very fine! I'll look for it at the BIB shows.
Paul
Title: Re: Kokonoe White Pine
Post by: John Kirby on August 19, 2011, 11:19 AM
Paul, I contemplated not saying anything about the tree being grafted, letting people spend their time looking for a graft, but then thought better of it. Boon was quite animated when he talked about the transformation over the past several years that included removing the JBP roots from under the Kokonoe roots. Regardless, finding an old JWP like this in the US, especially one without an obvious (or even hidden at the root crown) graft was not something that I had anticipated.
Title: Re: Kokonoe White Pine
Post by: John Kirby on August 04, 2012, 09:37 AM
Akio came in for a visit, here is the tree after being cleaned up and adjusted. A day full of work
Title: Re: Kokonoe White Pine
Post by: mcpesq817 on August 04, 2012, 03:04 PM
This is one of my favorite JWPs that I've seen posted.  Really great tree and fantastic work.
Title: Re: Kokonoe White Pine
Post by: Adair M on August 04, 2012, 08:46 PM
John,

Is this tree still at Boon's?  If so, I am looking forward to seeing it when I go there for the Fall Intensive.

I can only imagine how stunning this tree must be in person...

Title: Re: Kokonoe White Pine
Post by: MatsuBonsai on August 04, 2012, 09:15 PM
Very, very nice. We're you there during the work?  Any words of wisdom from Akio?
Title: Re: Kokonoe White Pine
Post by: Elliott on August 04, 2012, 11:43 PM
To cool! Chris, the way this tree is being handled is a step into the maturation and evolution of Bonsai in the US. To many times you go to a show and see a tree. with a name of a person next to it as the artist, when all that person did was maybe repot the tree after purchasing it last summer or the tree was worked on by that person's Bonsai instructor at their monthly class.
 When we start treating Bonsai like fine art (listing the owner and the artist side by side), we will really step up our game. We are getting more and more Japanese trained pro's coming around and we have to support them and not be ashamed to say "so n so is the artist, I just had the brains (and $) to hire them".
 Its great to develop your own skills as best as possible, but support the pro's who are trying to make a living also. Even most or the European artist's admit that we in North America have some of the best yamadori in the world and I'm real excited about the caliber of trees we are gonna be putting out in the next 20 years.
Title: Re: Kokonoe White Pine
Post by: John Kirby on August 05, 2012, 12:15 AM
I guess something must have been deleted, but I am very clear as to who does the majority of work on this tree, it is a good friend Akio Kondo from Japan. This tree has special meaning to me, if to no one else, in that it was Mr Kamiya's tree and it was shown in Japan, and Mr. Kamiya was the teacher of Akio Kondo, Daisaku Nomoto and Boon (and one other person who I am not sure is still in  bonsai), a bonai family thing. In the Japanese tradition, these trees are worked on by professionals to make the most of their potential. I will pass this tree on in the future, hopefully to someone who can keep it healthy and strong and beautiful.

Adair, the tree is at Boon's.

John
Title: Re: Kokonoe White Pine
Post by: Elliott on August 05, 2012, 01:05 AM
I absolutely did not mean to say you were taking credit for the tree!! I meant that by saying who worked on the tree, you were doing what is done in Japan and will be done here in the west more and more as our Bonsai skills evolve to match that of Japan.
Thanks and I apologise of I insulted you when I meant to compliment and give credit. 
Title: Re: Kokonoe White Pine
Post by: MatsuBonsai on August 05, 2012, 07:02 AM
This topic came up during my local study group yesterday, the notion of tree ownership.  It seems to me that it's often less about the tree and much more about the ego, which is unfortunate.  We would do much better if we had more ambassadors in American bonsai.  Instead we have a national organization that doesn't support a national exhibit, stagnation in many of the local clubs, and the "I know better" attitude.

We can support our local (and traveling) artists monetarily, if possible.  If money is short then a kind word and attentive audience goes a long way in showing our appreciation.

/rant
Title: Re: Kokonoe White Pine
Post by: Treebeard55 on August 05, 2012, 09:30 PM
Rant worthwhile, Matsu.
Title: Re: Kokonoe White Pine
Post by: Jason E on August 13, 2012, 10:23 AM
Fantastic tree. Artisans Cup in Portland next year?
Title: Re: Kokonoe White Pine
Post by: Chrisl on August 13, 2012, 01:00 PM
I agree also, worthwhile rant.  I've been 'accessing' US talent by going to our annual show's 'bring your own tree' workshops.  Last yr I did one with Ryan Neil, and this coming weekend I'm doing 2 dys. with Peter Warren.  Referring to the "$3,000" thread, I'd learn much more over time by going to intensives, and one day I do hope to be able to do this, but for now, show workshops are where I can access our gifted artists (All gifted artists, not just US is what I mean by "our"). 
Title: Re: Kokonoe White Pine
Post by: Judy on August 14, 2012, 09:57 AM
In re-reading the post, I came upon the realization that the owner of the tree should not be diminished in their importance of a great bonsais development. 
Without the owner, there would be no forward progression. 
Without the owner, no professional artist would be advancing the tree toward it's culmination of completeness (as much as a tree is ever "finished").
Without the owner, to pick the correct path, and correct artist, the tree would never realize it's full potential. 

Seems like this is discounted when we think of owners, and artists as two separate entities in the process.
Just my 2centavos.

Oh, and this tree is amazing, but you know that already!
Title: Re: Kokonoe White Pine
Post by: John Kirby on August 15, 2012, 01:58 PM
Judy, thanks. The future for truly high end bonsai in the US will be multi-generational trees, whether imports or domestics, that have the time and care invested in them to make them truly great. doesn't mean that there aren't fantastic trees already, but the next level on a broader scale. We some of these already, the legacy trees of John Naka, as long as they are allowed to continue to develop and are not made into static displays, the well known Hatanaka Junipers and Pines that you see around the US, and some really interesting trees that are passed down from teacher to student or between friends or club members. I think Mike Hagedorn posted a lovely piece on a maple from a deceased friend in Portland (If I got that wrong, the deceased part, I apologize profusely!).

JMEK. Thanks, I am not sure that this tree will be ready for the Artisans cup. This tree may be ready by the fall of 14 for the National Exhibition in N Y. Don't get me wrong, if it is ready I would certainly propose that it be in Portland, however I don't think it will be full enough, remember it must be at least as good as it was when shown previously, when it is right it will be shown.
Title: Re: Kokonoe White Pine
Post by: John Kirby on August 27, 2013, 08:43 AM
So, another year has passed. The jins I did last year are starting to weather, Akio dewired and thinned a bit. The tree will rest until next spring when we will repot, I am still trying to find a show pot for this tree. It is in a relatively expensive Tokoname ware container (as Bill V would say), however I am looking for something a little softer and perhaps reddish/brownish. Will have to see what we can find. I don't want to change the dimensions significantly, I really don't want to do major root work to get in to the next pot when I will have to drive the tree cross country a couple of months later and then wire it in late summer to get ready for the 4th National Show in Rochester in September.
Title: Re: Kokonoe White Pine
Post by: Chau Ho on August 27, 2013, 09:58 AM
Absolutely incredible, John. Thanks for sharing. I hope to get a chance to see the tree in person someday.

PS. It was great meeting you and Akio at John's place; many thanks for the wonderful advice and expertise.
Title: Re: Kokonoe White Pine
Post by: Judy on August 27, 2013, 10:08 AM
You didn't get any current pictures to share??? :-\
Title: Re: Kokonoe White Pine
Post by: John Kirby on August 27, 2013, 11:19 AM
I am going to California in a couple of weeks and will take some pictures. It is a little shaggy, good and strong.
Title: Re: Kokonoe White Pine
Post by: John Kirby on October 13, 2013, 11:13 PM
So, starting the pot search for this tree for next year in NY. This is a pot that Akio Kondo found in Japan. It is about 60 years old and was a commissioned (special order) pot that was a joint work stamped HARUMATU-RIYOKUJUAN TOUSUI. The tree is currently in a Tokoname 22+"x18"x51/2" Grey pot, the new Pot is 24+"x18"x6". Amazing how the shape of the pot affects your perception of size. We will see what it feels like when it arrives.
Title: Re: Kokonoe White Pine
Post by: Don Blackmond on January 06, 2014, 12:05 PM
I'd like to see this one again....
Title: Re: Kokonoe White Pine
Post by: John Kirby on January 06, 2014, 06:45 PM
Will be repotting in to show pot in the next few weeks. Will get pictures then, may be a little thin for Rochester, will see how it grows once I get it to Connecticut.
Title: Re: Kokonoe White Pine
Post by: Dan W. on January 06, 2014, 11:14 PM
If it doesn't like Connecticut I'll keep it in Wyoming for you... ;) (I wish...lol)
Title: Re: Kokonoe White Pine
Post by: Joshua Hanzman on January 07, 2014, 03:57 AM
What a fantastic tree, John, to have a tree so breath-taking in ones possession must be awesome, and is a feeling I MUST HAVE!!!I feel as if I agree about the dynamic between artist and owner. It seems like a very symbiotic relationship and one that is mutually beneficial, I can see no reason why anyone would argue against having a professional work on your trees!?. Even from a simple economic perspective why would I not want to pay someone to style my trees so perfectly!? Opportunity cost alone makes it worthwhile. I like clams/mussels, and steamers but I rather pay $4 a dozen than sift through the muck and brine looking for them. Now bonsai is not exactly sifting through the bay, but you get my point :P

And bonsai is an investment at the level your practicing it, so why would you not want to protect and nourish your investment? That's one great thing about bonsai as an art collectible, that bonsai should (on a long enough timeline) prove to be more valuable than paintings right? I mean the Mona Lisa is falling apart, but a bonsai just keeps replenishing itself! Theoretically forever if I'm not mistaken? I guess then the most important factor for longevity is design stability?
Title: Re: Kokonoe White Pine
Post by: Adair M on February 08, 2014, 12:15 PM
I took a pic with my iPhone. The tree is doing great, sorry about the poor pic, Boons aisles are narrow, I couldn't get the whole thing in the frame. If I can't get the photo loaded from my iPhone, I'll post it later when I get home.
Title: Re: Kokonoe White Pine
Post by: Judy on February 08, 2014, 03:02 PM
Love those new pot.  Even sideways!  Looking forward to more pics.
Title: Re: Kokonoe White Pine
Post by: John Kirby on February 08, 2014, 03:32 PM
I will be repotting with Boon this week(Thursday and Friday) will try and get it in a better spot for pictures.
Title: Re: Kokonoe White Pine
Post by: BonsaiEngineer1493 on February 08, 2014, 04:29 PM
Wow! Truly beautiful =]
Title: Re: Kokonoe White Pine
Post by: Herman on February 10, 2014, 09:32 AM
awe inspiring!!

this is the level of workmanship I want to aspire to!!

you have a family heirloom in this tree mr Kirby  ;)
congrats!

Regards
Herman
Title: Re: Kokonoe White Pine
Post by: John Kirby on August 16, 2014, 08:35 PM
Round. 3 of the development of this tree. In its pot and now wired with a goal of showing in 2016 at the nationals. Three plus days of wiring.
Title: Re: Kokonoe White Pine
Post by: Adair M on August 16, 2014, 09:55 PM
Wow, John, Big Brother really is enjoying the move to Connecticut. 

Are you going to show it in Rochester this year?
Title: Re: Kokonoe White Pine
Post by: John Kirby on August 16, 2014, 10:16 PM
Adair,
Boon and I discussed and believe that the tree should be better in 16. We will see.
Title: Re: Kokonoe White Pine
Post by: Adair M on August 16, 2014, 10:45 PM
Silly me, I just went straight to the pictures, didn't even look at the text!
Title: Re: Kokonoe White Pine
Post by: BonsaiEngineer1493 on August 16, 2014, 10:45 PM
Nice job John!
Title: Re: Kokonoe White Pine
Post by: Don Blackmond on August 17, 2014, 07:16 AM
Simply beautiful
Title: Re: Kokonoe White Pine
Post by: Judy on August 17, 2014, 07:45 AM
One of a kind, sure is a beautiful tree. Must be something in person!
Title: Re: Kokonoe White Pine
Post by: Jason E on August 17, 2014, 07:46 AM
Killer tree. thanks for the update.
Title: Re: Kokonoe White Pine
Post by: Yenling83 on August 18, 2014, 01:46 PM
Love it, very nice!!!
Title: Re: Kokonoe White Pine
Post by: shimsuki on August 18, 2014, 08:59 PM
Must be something in person!

Oh it is!!! Trust me :)

Title: Re: Kokonoe White Pine
Post by: Adair M on August 18, 2014, 09:22 PM
Indeed it is. I'm going to miss seeing it at Boon's. John has taken it home.
Title: Re: Kokonoe White Pine
Post by: John Kirby on August 21, 2014, 10:19 PM
Here is a picture from Taikan-ten Show Book from 1999. Tree has changed a lot.
Title: Re: Kokonoe White Pine
Post by: Herman on August 22, 2014, 01:44 AM
Hello Mr Kirby,

the apex looks a lot more defined now than it looks in the book, I like it :)

kind regards
Herman