Author Topic: JWP  (Read 5011 times)

johng

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JWP
« on: June 21, 2009, 09:50 PM »
As requested here is a pic of my large Japanese White Pine.  I purchased this tree in Japan from Hiro Yamaji in the fall of 2000.  It had been in my care ever since.  It is a little over 30" tall and 6-7 inches at the base.  The container is Chinese.  Last Spring I had the opportunity to share it again with Hiro.  He seemed to be very impressed and in his humble Japanese manner said that he has produced very few trees with the potential of this one...probably just blowing smoke up my butt, but it did make me proud.  Bill V. also saw this picture last Jan. and requested that I submit for the national show...again I was humbled. Due to a conflict, I did not submit the tree for consideration.
The second pic is of the tree just prior to the last time I wired it...winter 08.

Here is a link to additional pics if you are interested... http://picasaweb.google.com/john.geanangel/WhitePine?feat=directlink
 

MatsuBonsai

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Re: JWP
« Reply #1 on: June 21, 2009, 10:00 PM »
John,

This is a great tree with a great shape.  Thanks for sharing.  The additional photos at picasa were great, too!
 

MatsuBonsai

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Re: JWP
« Reply #2 on: June 22, 2009, 08:46 AM »
John,

Is this a named variety by chance?  Since you've had it have you learned anything about it's care specific to your region?  Are there any special requirements in dealing with the heat and humidity, etc.?

Thanks again for sharing.
 

johng

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Re: JWP
« Reply #3 on: June 22, 2009, 11:00 PM »
To my knowledge it is not a named variety.  As far as care is concerned, this tree has been very easy...not near as many things to do as JBP.  I do try to protect it some given the potential extremes of weather in my area.  However, this tree was grown in southern Japan, Shikoku Island...virtually the same latitude as where I live...I am about 80-90 miles further South.  I have repot about every 3 years.  It has also been wired three times.  It likes to be fertilized:) 
John
 

Dano

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Re: JWP
« Reply #4 on: June 26, 2009, 06:57 PM »
John,
Beautiful tree. It was interesting how you did the gravity tie downs without using any roots or external anchors. It seems that you just ran wires through the drainage holes all the up to the limbs. Is that how you do it? I like this method to achieve the same result as heavy wiring. Take care.

Dan
 

bwaynef

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Re: JWP
« Reply #5 on: June 26, 2009, 08:07 PM »
I've so far avoided JWP thinking they'd suffer our summers.  Being slightly north of you, and much nearer the mountains my climate is probably a little closer to where this tree came from.  I'm completely unfamiliar with JWP care.  Could you explain briefly the major steps in care throughout the year?
 

johng

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Re: JWP
« Reply #6 on: June 26, 2009, 08:25 PM »
John,
Beautiful tree. It was interesting how you did the gravity tie downs without using any roots or external anchors. It seems that you just ran wires through the drainage holes all the up to the limbs. Is that how you do it? I like this method to achieve the same result as heavy wiring. Take care.

Dan

Hey Dan, I am glad you like the tree.  You are almost correct in your description.  What I actually do is like adding an extra tie down wire...a little larger gauge... and often not put in place until after the tree is firmly potted.   Each end  of the wire is weaved through one of the drainage or wire holes in the bottom pot and forced up through to the surface. Once the wire is in place a create a loop at each end that ends up just below the level of the soil.  Then I use the loops as the secure point for the guy wires.  I have only done this a couple of times but it has worked very satisfactorily each time...a little less unsightly and much less potential for damage.   

John
 

johng

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Re: JWP
« Reply #7 on: June 26, 2009, 09:01 PM »
I've so far avoided JWP thinking they'd suffer our summers.  Being slightly north of you, and much nearer the mountains my climate is probably a little closer to where this tree came from.  I'm completely unfamiliar with JWP care.  Could you explain briefly the major steps in care throughout the year?

Hey Wayne,
I also had concerns about the climate and had a small JWP for about 8 years before I purchased this one.  There are also several other JWP...of various varieties...including wart bark and zuishio that have done well in this area for many years.  One of the things that convinced me most to take the plunge was the location of the nursery in Japan from which I purchased this tree.  It was late November but the heat and humidity felt very much like home....the latitude is almost identical as well. 

As far as care is concerned I am embarrassed to say that I have to do very little to this tree.  Unlike JBP, in my experience JWP will only push one set of buds a season...due to this, care is much simplified.  Once the candles have hardened off, I prune anything that is out of shape.  I fertilize and water judicially through the growing season.  In the fall, I remove last year's needles and thin this year's needles in areas where the growth is heavy.  This tree lives on its table year round...no protection at all in the winter and medium sun in the summer...  Otherwise, I spend the rest of the time just enjoying:)

I have often heard people say that JWP is difficult to maintain...to this point I find just the opposite to be true fortunately.  IMO the most difficult thing to do is find a decent one.  This may sound crazy but I wanted to buy several in Japan...the price was right and Yamaji had hundreds of these growing in the ground and more than a few in pots.  This was the only one I could find that had all the right characteristics.  My friend, Ken Duncan (who somebody needs to invite here please:)) also purchased one and still has it....its nice as well but a little different that this one.

Just for the record I have also successfully maintained a mame JWP that I purchased from Suthin in 2005.  Just can't seem to find a pic at the moment...it is less than 4" and in a tiny container.

Thanks for the interest...I hope this helps.
John
 

shimsuki

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Re: JWP
« Reply #8 on: July 25, 2009, 09:44 PM »
Really nice goyomatsu. I like the pot you picked out for it as well. I also like the before and after pictures in the first post. Good work!
 

Sorce

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Re: JWP
« Reply #9 on: May 04, 2014, 06:42 AM »
Oh yeah, definitely a beautiful specimen.

Update!?