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Author Topic: JWP soil  (Read 1041 times)
BonsaiEngineer1493
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« on: February 05, 2013, 08:38 PM »

Hey Forum

I recently purchased a pre bonsai JWP from nebonsai. I will post the pictures soon. I am planning on transplanting it this spring. I am looking for the best mix you could recommend for JWP. Generally speaking I would like to know the soil components in the mixture and the grain size. One more question: when I perform the transplant, how much original soil should I keep?
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Judy
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« Reply #1 on: February 06, 2013, 07:28 AM »

You should check with NEBG and find out how recently the tree was repotted.  They use an akadama based soil mix for their JWP that is a great soil.  So if it's not in need of a soil change, I'd leave it in the current soil.  If you need to repot it, I would suggest you buy a small bag of their soil mix and have them ship it with the tree....
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John Kirby
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« Reply #2 on: February 06, 2013, 08:03 AM »

Akadama, pumice and volcanic scoria. 3-5mm, sifted. The tres from NE Bonsai are grafted on to JBP understock. You remove a good portion of root and soil to get the tree into a bonsai training pot after removing it from the azalea pot. These trees were bare rooted for import, so you don't need to worry about cleaning out the rootball for a number of years.
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BonsaiEngineer1493
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« Reply #3 on: February 06, 2013, 10:03 AM »

Judy: the conifer mix or premium bonsai mix?

I read a good recommendation about boon's mix. Do you guys also agree that it would be great for jwp?
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bwaynef
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« Reply #4 on: February 06, 2013, 10:36 AM »

With only slight variations, I've seen Boon (and SoBs) recommend that same mix for nearly all species (the exception being kanuma for Azaleas).
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John Kirby
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« Reply #5 on: February 06, 2013, 10:50 AM »

Wayne, the priciples are the same for most species- those that really love acidic soils do well with kanuma.

Boon's mix is a mix of akadama, pumice and volcanic, the scoria can be replaced with river sand (fine gravel) like kiriyu. The proportion of each canvarydepending  on the species. There are several commercial blnds available, Clay King, Aoki and Dragon Spring. Most folks just by the components and make themselves (NE Bonsai takes the dust out and does this for you).
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BonsaiEngineer1493
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« Reply #6 on: February 06, 2013, 11:11 AM »

Interesting. John so I would like to ask you the same question I asked Judy. Which mix from their site: conifer mix or premium bonsai mix?
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John Kirby
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« Reply #7 on: February 06, 2013, 11:41 AM »

What are the ingredients of each?
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Judy
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« Reply #8 on: February 06, 2013, 06:32 PM »

Premium. That's the one with the akadama.  Boons mix will work equally well.  You just have to be watchful for when the akadama starts to breakdown, and repot accordingly.
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BonsaiEngineer1493
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« Reply #9 on: February 06, 2013, 09:33 PM »

I'm not familiar with akadama soil so I'm not sure what the breakdown is? In addition what do mean by accordingly for the repot?
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bwaynef
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« Reply #10 on: February 07, 2013, 12:50 AM »

You just have to be watchful for when the akadama starts to breakdown, and repot accordingly.

I'm not familiar with akadama soil so I'm not sure what the breakdown is? In addition what do mean by accordingly for the repot?

Judy's saying that over time Akadama breaks down.  It loses its structure.  It can turn to mush.  Watch out for that, and if/when it becomes a problem, you'll need to repot.
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John Kirby
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« Reply #11 on: February 07, 2013, 09:39 AM »

It isn't a serious problem if you buy good Akadama and repot on a reasonable schedule. Happens in Japan as well.
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Judy
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« Reply #12 on: February 07, 2013, 10:01 AM »

Agreed, there are different versions of akadama that last longer, even in our freeze thaw cycles in our colder areas.  Double hard line is the least susceptible.  I think that's the hardest version.

Engineer, the reasoning behind getting some soil from NEBG, is if it's already in this soil, you won't have to deal with taking the old soil off, unless it's broken down.  The particle sizes/types may be different in a mix from somewhere else, might not be a problem, but if it's too different, you could wind up with different water retention spots in the pot. 
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Adair M
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« Reply #13 on: February 07, 2013, 10:24 AM »

It takes a couple of years for the akadama to break down. 

In fall, you should be doing a soil surface cleanup.  During the year, you get weeds, and a crust can build up from organic fertilizers.  So, in the fall, you go around and remove the top 1/2 to 1 inch of soil.  And replace it with fresh.  At that time, you will see if the akadama is breaking down, and make a note to repot it in the spring.

You can also look underneath the pot, and if you see there's lots of roots forcing their way out the drain holes, it's time to repot.

Ideally, you should repot just as the akadama begins to break down.
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