Author Topic: How late can I can repot a JWP  (Read 3023 times)

Bonsaiguru

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How late can I can repot a JWP
« on: August 30, 2011, 05:42 PM »
I got a Shohin JWP, upon inspecting the soil I noticed that it is quite compact, but it is full of mychoriz (dont know how to spell it). I am wondering if I can get away with a quick repot or wait til spring. I am in the bay area (east bay). I already scrap some of the compact soil from the top and made some holes, but don't know if that is enough.
 

Treebeard55

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Re: How late can I can repot a JWP
« Reply #1 on: August 30, 2011, 05:54 PM »
Unless I'm mighty much mistaken, pines must be repotted in spring: that's when they have their one annual major flush of growth. That's a lesson I learned at the cost of several dead pines!

(There are exceptions: JBP has a 2nd flush later, and the mugo is best repotted, apparently, in late summer. Can't think of any others.)

If your soil really is full of mycorrhizae, that's definite plus: the mycorrhizae will help the tree get by until spring.

Even so, I strongly suggest you take the tree to a local bonsaiist with JWP experience, for his/her "eyes-on" evaluation. There's only so much help we can give at long distance
 

Bonsaiguru

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Re: How late can I can repot a JWP
« Reply #2 on: August 30, 2011, 08:38 PM »
I knew that spring is really the best time to do it, I too learned through my past experience, but I am actual more confident with white pines as I have kept them some time. But this one was bought from New England Bonsai Gardens (which has great stock) and just noticed that the soil was quite compact and it should have been repotted this past spring, but it was not. I have heard in Fall there is a small window that a repot can be done, but just trying to see what others might suggest. I probably going to hold off and just  keep a better eye on it through the winter.
 

Owen Reich

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Re: How late can I can repot a JWP
« Reply #3 on: August 30, 2011, 11:50 PM »
We repot Pinus parviflora here in Osaka the end of July to early August as the general rule of thumb.  We still repot now (two yesterday actually), but the window is closing fast for doing anything more than a light raking of the perimeter for a pot and/or angle change.   We are never too aggressive with the removal of soil or roots.   I'm not familiar with your area, so the physiological point to know it's ok to repot is when the current year's needles have hardened and the bud(s) in the center is a little more brown.  We are approximately 4 weeks ahead of Knoxville, TN according to Bjorn.

 

Bonsaiguru

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Re: How late can I can repot a JWP
« Reply #4 on: August 31, 2011, 12:17 AM »
Thanks for your help Owen, I going to repot tomorrow and do very little on the roots and basically spread out the roots and put it in fresh bonsai soil. It does not a lot pruning and styling, but it is quite healthy.
 

tanlu

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Re: How late can I can repot a JWP
« Reply #5 on: August 31, 2011, 12:45 AM »
While early to mid spring is the optimum time to repot MOST pines. I repotted a non-grafted JWP last year in mid Sept and it responded with vigorous root growth that autumn and long candle extension in spring. I even removed 25% of the roots, but maintained as many feeder roots as possible. I also own some JWP, but all are non-grafted. In my area it's cooled down significantly, so I would repot now. One thing that helps is cool overcast weather for at least the first week after repotting.

Best of luck!   
 

jtucker

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Re: How late can I can repot a JWP
« Reply #6 on: August 31, 2011, 01:26 AM »
Here in Southern California a lot of our trees, native and not, seem to have a couple growing windows: One big growth flush in the spring, a dormant period in the hottest part of summer, and then another rush of growth in "fall". I put it in quotes because we don't really have autumn here like the rest of the country.

On several species, we can get away with doing typically spring duties during the early fall, when temperatures move back into the same growth ranges as early spring. While repotting now probably isn't ideal for the growth cycle, as long as you don't do it right in the middle of the absolute hottest or coldest weather of the year, things can survive if you baby them afterward.

I second what Treebeard said: Always try and check with someone that lives in your area and has grown what you are growing. If you're searching to blaze a trail and be the one JWP guy in your neck of the woods, then experiment on some lower quality trees and let us know how it turns out!

In the words of one of my bonsai mentors, "Yeah, that'll probably work!!! or it might not..."