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Author Topic: Five needle pines  (Read 1108 times)
Mnmbjc
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Posts: 16
USDA Hardiness: 5

« on: January 25, 2013, 11:59 PM »

New to the board but appreciate everyone's great input.I am starting a collection of different five needle pines.They consist of Sugar pine,Japanese white pines,Limber pines,and Bristlecones.Most of my trees will be to young to work on as I enjoy growing them.I am new to Bonsai so I want to learn as I go.So I figured I would start out young and work my way along.What I would like to know is what are the rules for five needle pines.I have done a lot of research on the species,but would like experienced growers feedback.
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Judy
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USDA Hardiness: 5b

« Reply #1 on: January 26, 2013, 11:02 AM »

I would suggest getting some books on the subject.  Bonsai Today has a Pines book you could start with.
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MatsuBonsai
John Callaway
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USDA Hardiness: 6b



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« Reply #2 on: January 26, 2013, 11:12 AM »

Where are you located?  Any clubs in your area?  What is your comfort level with wiring, pruning, repotting, etc?

Pictures always help.
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J

Mnmbjc
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USDA Hardiness: 5

« Reply #3 on: January 26, 2013, 11:27 AM »

I am located in Nebraska.I will try and get some pictures up but most I'm going to let grow for a couple years.Im comfortable with wiring and pruning but some info on White pines seems misleading.I want to know more before I get more advanced specimens.Clubs in Nebraska are very limited if at all.Needle reduction and how to handle the candles is what seems misleading to me.I know white pines only have one growth a year so I need to handle the candles and pruning different than japanese black pines.So I guess what I'm asking is what are he basic guidelines in handling white pines through the seasons.
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MatsuBonsai
John Callaway
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« Reply #4 on: January 26, 2013, 11:43 AM »

The very simplest of guidelines is feed in fall, pinch in spring (around tax day for me in my area). 

Of course this is far too simplistic, and should be followed by "it depends".  Your trees may need more or less fertilizer and/or water throughout the growing season in order to achieve specific goals.  Pinching may or may not be necessary depending on strength and redirecting of energy.
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J

Mnmbjc
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Posts: 16
USDA Hardiness: 5

« Reply #5 on: January 26, 2013, 07:59 PM »

What I want to do is be aggressive with feeding and to let the trees  grow out.I don't think needle length is a concern right now.A good question would be do I pinch to redirect energy to maintain the shape I want,or let it grow and trim back later.I should say I have trees from 4 years old to seedlings.
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