Author Topic: Eastern Pine  (Read 4334 times)

GBHunter

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Eastern Pine
« on: July 23, 2014, 07:13 PM »
This is a terrible pine to use for bonsai material.  However I use this tree for practice,  if I learn a new technique I try it on this tree first.
The bark on this tree is too thin to use wire. The branches are very easy to break, the needles do not reduce and the bark is smooth a juvenile.
But I love working on this trees and enjoy looking at it.  ;D
 

Adair M

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Re: Eastern Pine
« Reply #1 on: July 23, 2014, 07:33 PM »
I've seen them wired.
 

GBHunter

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Re: Eastern Pine
« Reply #2 on: July 23, 2014, 08:42 PM »
They can be wired, on my pine however I would need to wrap something around the branch.
The bark is paper thin.
 

Adair M

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Re: Eastern Pine
« Reply #3 on: July 23, 2014, 10:57 PM »
I'm sorry, I don't understand.  Thin bark?  Is the problem the wire cuts in too fast?

A couple solutions:  1) Periodically inspect the wired tree, and if you see wire cutting in, remove the wire.  2)  Use a larger gauge wire.  Fatter wire does not cut in as sharply as thin wire.  So if some amount of cutting in occurs, it's less apparent.

I am unaware of any pine that has been refined without using wire.
 

0soyoung

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Re: Eastern Pine
« Reply #4 on: July 24, 2014, 12:03 AM »
This is a terrible pine to use for bonsai material.  However I use this tree for practice,  if I learn a new technique I try it on this tree first.
The bark on this tree is too thin to use wire. The branches are very easy to break, the needles do not reduce and the bark is smooth a juvenile.
But I love working on this trees and enjoy looking at it.  ;D

So what techniques have you tried on this tree?
What work is it that you love so much doing with you P. strobus, beside looking at it?

In brief, what is your point?
 

GBHunter

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Re: Eastern Pine
« Reply #5 on: July 24, 2014, 12:49 AM »
This is a terrible pine to use for bonsai material.  However I use this tree for practice,  if I learn a new technique I try it on this tree first.
The bark on this tree is too thin to use wire. The branches are very easy to break, the needles do not reduce and the bark is smooth a juvenile.
But I love working on this trees and enjoy looking at it.  ;D

So what techniques have you tried on this tree?
What work is it that you love so much doing with you P. strobus, beside looking at it?

In brief, what is your point?

Just wanted to post pics of it I suppose.  But the things that I have tried was needle pulling, decandling and some root cutting things I saw online.
I do have a question however, I am being told by varius sources that white pines are temperamental when compared to black pinesis this true? And how so?
 

Herman

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Re: Eastern Pine
« Reply #6 on: July 24, 2014, 02:31 AM »
I'm sorry, I don't understand.  Thin bark?  Is the problem the wire cuts in too fast?

A couple solutions:  1) Periodically inspect the wired tree, and if you see wire cutting in, remove the wire.  2)  Use a larger gauge wire.  Fatter wire does not cut in as sharply as thin wire.  So if some amount of cutting in occurs, it's less apparent.

I am unaware of any pine that has been refined without using wire.

Hi GB,

you can wire this tree without covering the bark, no problem. looks like a nice tree to practice all sorts of techniques on :)

Just wanted to post pics of it I suppose.  But the things that I have tried was needle pulling, decandling and some root cutting things I saw online.
I do have a question however, I am being told by varius sources that white pines are temperamental when compared to black pinesis this true? And how so?

Pinus Thunbergii's(japanese black pines) are more vigorous than Pinus Parviflora(japanese white pines). I don't know how Eastern White Pine compares to P. Thunbergii...

So what techniques have you tried on this tree?
What work is it that you love so much doing with you P. strobus, beside looking at it?

In brief, what is your point?


??? was this called for? he posted this to let us know he is trying, working and learning...

kind regards
Herman
 

0soyoung

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Re: Eastern Pine
« Reply #7 on: July 24, 2014, 02:33 AM »
This is a terrible pine to use for bonsai material.  However I use this tree for practice,  if I learn a new technique I try it on this tree first.
The bark on this tree is too thin to use wire. The branches are very easy to break, the needles do not reduce and the bark is smooth a juvenile.
But I love working on this trees and enjoy looking at it.  ;D

So what techniques have you tried on this tree?
What work is it that you love so much doing with you P. strobus, beside looking at it?

In brief, what is your point?

Just wanted to post pics of it I suppose.  But the things that I have tried was needle pulling, decandling and some root cutting things I saw online.
I do have a question however, I am being told by varius sources that white pines are temperamental when compared to black pinesis this true? And how so?

Japanese white pine (P. parviflora/pentaphylla) definitely is 'tempermental' compared to Japanese black pine (P. thunbergii). P. strobus isn't tempermental in my opinion. In fact, one of its nice characteristics is that it is quite shade tolerant. It, unlike JWP, is multi-flushing. This means that one can decandle it like JBPs and achieve reduced needle size though this does lead to certain problems with P. strobus. Since branches are largely autonomous, I leave it to you to try this on a branch or two and see what happens when you decandle c.a. June as one does with JBP.

Like JWP, P. strobus does not bud on bare stems; it buds only where needles are. Fascicular buds can be induced on P. strobus by pruning in spring (prior to the end of June, or so) and keeping several rows of fascicles at the cut end.

So a treatment to generate ramification on P. strobus might be to trim back all branch tips c.a. May and then repeat in the next season. Since the fascicular buds will only occur where needles are, you could pull needles from the top and bottom sides in the fall or winter; then next year's fascicular buds will only occur in a horizontal plane, just like you want for a foliage pad.

Like Adair indicated, I don't think P. strobus is particularly thin skinned. But you should be aware that the bark of all trees will easily separate from the wood during the active growing season. This is why pine wiring is usually done in the late fall or during winter. People wrap larger branches with raffia and/or self-amalgamating tapes before wiring and bending them. The tight wrapping holds the bark and cambium in place as well as cushioning them from the wire biting in. You can get raffia at most any hobby store and there are lots of YouTube videos showing how it is applied. Since you are experimenting, you could try this now and again this winter to practice as well as experience the timing difference.

Bottom line is that I don't think P. strobus is terrible for bonsai. It just presents some challenges. Normally bonsai is first and foremost about the trunk - form, bark, contrast of dead wood. Then ,secondarily, the foliage followed by the postion of the major branch. With P. strobus one must break the rules which only means you are almost certain to not produce a prize winning tree - you can still make an admirable bonsai that displays the most attractive aspect(s) of P. strobus for your own enjoyment. Making bonsai that you like and enjoy should be your only goal.

I am having fun playing with several P. strobus myself, including a couple of dwarf P. strobus in my landscape. I particularly like almost ethereal foliage - it is unequalled in any other pine, in my opinion.
 

Sorce

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Re: Eastern Pine
« Reply #8 on: July 24, 2014, 04:48 AM »
Thanks Herm for keeping us gentleman.

Thanks Oso for the excellent follow up!

_________

Things are easily misunderstood without the right smileys!  ;)


In a critique on youtube, Oryangon talks about pointing out the good aspects of a tree, rather than the bad.

We should treat posts the same!


Trees are my teachers as well!
 

GBHunter

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Re: Eastern Pine
« Reply #9 on: July 24, 2014, 11:52 AM »
My wife dubed the tree the teddy bear plant as the needles are so soft.
I olso have a juniper that is dubed the "dancer" since it looks like a person break dancing...the little problem with it is , it has a sacrifice branch in an uhm... interesting spot making it look more like an African fertility statue.   ;D

Thank you for all the help. I will work on this plant and wait to drop a lot of money on a nice white pine.
Brent already had some picked out in case I was interested.