Species Specific > Trident Maple Bonsai Discussion

Trunk Chopping Trident Maples best time?

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Gaffer:
Happy new year everyone
I have a need of some guidance . A bit off topic but not in the end result. I have a trident that I have let grow in the garden for a few years and it is time to do some serious stuff. There are in the one trunk 3  nice trees one on top of each other. I want to layer them out and was wondering if I can layer them all at the same time or should  I just start at the bottom and do one a year. I am not in a rush I just want to get started. Please help me. Does Peter Tea ever read our blogs.
Thanks
Qualicum Brian

bwaynef:

--- Quote from: Gaffer on January 07, 2014, 04:30 PM ---There are in the one trunk 3  nice trees one on top of each other. I want to layer them out and was wondering if I can layer them all at the same time or should  I just start at the bottom and do one a year.
--- End quote ---
I've seen this question pop up before ...and can't recall the answer.  If you wanted to go the patient route, I'd start at the top rather than the bottom though.  If you opt for the 3-in-1, I'd only recommend it if the tree grew very strongly this past season until dormancy ...and you're willing to commit to its needs, both water and fertilizer, through this season.

donmaple:
Gaffer, it looks like you and I are in similar growing zones. Here are some things to think about. When you layer a tree, you interrupt the flow of sugars to the roots but not the water from the roots. Therefore, the roots are working hard to supply water but getting nothing in return to maintain health. The leaves are the factories of sugar, so the more leaves you have feeding the roots the better the health of the roots. If you layer the tree ; (1) below all the leaves: no sugar to the roots = unhealthy roots, (2)halfway to top: half sugar to roots, half sugar to callus = happy roots and happy callus, (3) most of the way to top: really happy roots and somewhat happy callus. The health of the tree is very important in all of this, the healthier the tree the better the results. It has been my experience with Tridents that the older the bark is, the longer it takes the callus to generate roots. Now having bored you to death...I would recommend taking the two uppermost trees as one layer this spring and then the top of that tree the next spring. If you had a picture of your tree to share it would be easier to say for sure. Hope this helps, Don

Gaffer:
Thanks don
I took other advise as well and it was very similar to yours. I have lots of time so I chose to just layer the top tree. We have been having a wonderful winter here withe maybe only 5 days of some frosty so I am way ahead of myself with potting up etc. I have lot of last years seedlings so if I run into trouble as long as it calluses I can always root graft. Thank you for responding.
Qualicum Brian

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