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Author Topic: Trident Maple Rules  (Read 1449 times)
Mnmbjc
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Posts: 16
USDA Hardiness: 5

« on: January 26, 2013, 12:18 AM »

I have acquired a lot of very young Trident maples.I have researched techniques and practiced some with good results.But the trees are young and I won't be able to do any real work for awhile.I am looking to acquire some older plant material this spring but want to know more.I know a little about defoliation,repotting and wiring but not nearly enough.Any detailed Trident Maple techniques would be helpful as I would like to learn as much as possible.Im also new to the board as this is my second post.I posted on the Japanese white pine forum about Five Needle Pines that will consist of the bulk of my collection with Trident maples as my deciduous tree.
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Jason E
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Posts: 250
USDA Hardiness: 8a



« Reply #1 on: January 26, 2013, 10:04 AM »

mnmbjc, you might try Peter Adams book "bonsai w/ japanese maples" It has some good info on developing maples.

jason
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MatsuBonsai
John Callaway
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Posts: 1374
USDA Hardiness: 6b



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« Reply #2 on: January 26, 2013, 11:31 AM »

When you say very young, do you mean 1-0 seedlings?  Saplings with little movement?  Single digit year trees?  What are your short-term and long-term goals with your trident(s)?

Wayne started a thread some time ago in which Al shared some great info on creating trident maple with quick taper:
http://bonsaistudygroup.com/trident-maple-discussion/new-trident-full-of-options/msg7976/#msg7976

John Kirby has a great thread about a shohin trident he's been working on:
http://bonsaistudygroup.com/trident-maple-discussion/shohin-trident/
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J

augustine
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Posts: 165
USDA Hardiness: 7A

« Reply #3 on: January 26, 2013, 11:43 AM »

With all due respect you've skipped a lot of steps and are basically trying to start at question 85 without dealing with the basics.

First learn how to keep your plants alive and thriving. Water and site (sun and shade) requirements and feeding. Insects will probably come with the growing season as well as the possibility of disease (these things may be no bid deal if you know what to do). You'll have to learn what to look for when inspecting your plants (daily). Soil mix requirements are essential. Etc., etc., etc...

Read and search this forum for basic culture and species specifics. Search the web to read about bonsai (in general). Also there are good articles on evergreengardenworks.com. Books may be available at public library. Plenty of videos on youtube. Join a club.

You have to do your research and reading. You need foundation knowledge before you deal with specific techniques that are down the road. Defoliation is not performed on young plants. (Keep all foliage to promote growth.)

Set yourself up for success. The joy of bonsai is the journey, not the destination. It is a process and you can enjoy your plants whether they are seedlings or masterpieces. Enjoy the closeness to nature and rhythm of the seasons that tending your trees will bring.

Best of luck!

Augustine
Central MD 7A



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Mnmbjc
Legit New User
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Posts: 16
USDA Hardiness: 5

« Reply #4 on: January 26, 2013, 08:09 PM »

Believe me the growing process is more important to me right now than anything.As with my JWP I have anything from 4 years old to seedlings.Long term is to get them bigger and learn techniques as I go.I was thinking of planting them in the ground but my shade is limited gets to hot here in the summer.So I thought about bigger growing pots that I can place a little easier.I would also like to develop a forest planting with the seedlings.The older Tridents have been partially wired and I was able to defoliate to create a few more branches last year.Thanks Matsu for the threads.
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akeppler
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Posts: 388



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« Reply #5 on: January 27, 2013, 01:02 AM »

Thanks for the link John.

All my trident work is available for review very easily now along with some new work today at:

http://bonsaial.wordpress.com/
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