Author Topic: Trident #2  (Read 3125 times)

bwaynef

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Trident #2
« on: February 02, 2011, 10:45 AM »
Last spring I was pretty brutal when repotting this tree.  I cut the roots back severely leaving a handful of large roots and a plethora of small roots radiating from the trunk.  I tried to arrange them w/ the future in mind.

I left it to grow in its pond basket with minor trimming through the year.  I was VERY pleased with the growth/vigor of the tree over the year, particularly in light of how aggressively it was root pruned.  (Al K mentioned that tridents kick it into high gear when they're severely root pruned and I thought I'd test his theory. (I don't recall where I read that, probably one of his excellent posts @ bN.)  I'm satisfied he knows what he's talking about.)  As you can see i've got some pretty ugly scarring going on.  I cut into the scar late last summer to try to get it to continue to roll over.

Its a little early to be repotting, but I'm trying not to have to do all my repots at the same time, and I've got room to keep it above freezing if/when that becomes a necessity.  I'll admit, the biggest factor was that I wanted to see how those roots looked.

Future plans:  I'm interested in hearing any options you guys see for it, but I'm tempted to chop it back below all branching (and ugly scarring) and build off its only strengths (flare & future nebari).
 

bwaynef

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Re: Trident #2
« Reply #1 on: February 02, 2011, 10:46 AM »
A few more
 

bwaynef

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Re: Trident #2
« Reply #2 on: February 02, 2011, 10:56 AM »
I meant to add, the tree's potted a little deep right now, to allow the small roots to develop, as well as to help flatten out the spread a little.
 

Zach Smith

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Re: Trident #2
« Reply #3 on: February 02, 2011, 12:25 PM »
Wayne, I think you've got a great start no matter what you decide.  I guess if it were me, I'd go ahead and develop what's there.  You have a very nice nebari and solid trunk line with good taper.  You even have the beginnings of the branching you'll need already in place.

Good luck with it, and keep us posted!

Zach
 

akeppler

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Re: Trident #2
« Reply #4 on: February 02, 2011, 07:11 PM »
Wayne I like the trunk and the taper. I also like the apex as it is growing now. What I see as a potential problem, and what can happen to tridents in a hurry is the dueling apexes you have right now. The good apex (with movement and pruned back) is good and in a good place and a good thickness. The one behind it that is bolting straight up is also good for helping heal that large scar. The problem will be is that due to the proximity of the two leaders, a huge bulge will build in that area. It will be a bulge that will reall wreck the nice taper you have there.

Currently, the apex in back is the stronger of the two based on extension of what I can see. Anytime a trident bolts it adds tissue fast. This year would be the time that the damage would start to show itself. The tree is not so far along that a new apex can be built later. It can be built in three years tops so I would think about removing one or the other and heal the wound and then cut back the bolting apex and start a new apex with that, or vice versa. The problem will be keeping the real apex would mean that you will grow that front one to double the thickness in about two years. I think the taper would still be OK though it would have to be chopped back and regrown a couple times. The chops add buds though and these can be reserved for building those apical canopy branches ;D
 

Hotaction

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Re: Trident #2
« Reply #5 on: February 03, 2011, 02:09 PM »
Wayne, I'd consider removing everything above the first branch.  Then reduce that remaining branchnand see what happens, all the while you're building better surface roots.

Dave
« Last Edit: February 03, 2011, 02:35 PM by Hotaction »