Author Topic: New Trident full of options  (Read 24486 times)

gibmeister

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Re: New Trident full of options
« Reply #15 on: July 29, 2009, 07:54 PM »
What is the best time of year to do a trunk chop on a trident maple?
 

bonsaikc

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Re: New Trident full of options
« Reply #16 on: July 30, 2009, 10:13 AM »
I recommend spring, around repotting time. The tree will bud vigorously.

Chris
 

gibmeister

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Re: New Trident full of options
« Reply #17 on: July 30, 2009, 09:04 PM »
Chris,

Thanks! I have a couple I want to chop.

Gib
 

bwaynef

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Re: New Trident full of options
« Reply #18 on: November 19, 2010, 08:27 AM »
The airlayer took longer than I'd expected it to take through a few miscues of mine.  Fortuitously, the branch that remains was not a branch (or was small enough to not be noticed) before I'd started the airlayer.

There's still a little more uprightness to be had in that branch.


...Behold:
 

bwaynef

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Re: New Trident full of options
« Reply #19 on: November 19, 2010, 10:27 AM »
I was wrong about the fortuitous popping of the bud that became this branch.  If you look at:

you can see this branch was in place previous to my airlayering attempt. 

In the last post I mentioned I could bring that branch up further.  Any thoughts as to whether I should?


ps.  The airlayered portion had fantastic color this fall, ...but it's nothing to look at so I haven't bothered to take any picture(s) of it.  Thanks for asking.

 

MatsuBonsai

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Re: New Trident full of options
« Reply #20 on: November 19, 2010, 10:31 AM »
Looking good, Wayne.  What are your plans for the future?  Perhaps adjust the planting angle at some point a little more to the right?  Just a thought.  Still lots of time to decide with this one, I'm sure.
 

akeppler

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Re: New Trident full of options
« Reply #21 on: November 20, 2010, 01:10 PM »
Hi Wayne

If you really want to develop a trident that is small, powerful and compact, take all the wire off (it just stresses cells and slows down growth) and let the leader on the left full reign, probably two years or more. That will smooth out the transition. Branch building is not going to take place on that leader anyway. It's just too high.

When the leader is at the point that a smooth transition is achieved it will be saw about 3/8 to 1/2 inch above the beheading. This should be done in spring right at bud break. At that point you will get a good flush of buds no only at the chop for transition but also good buds on the trunk. You need that great branch (sasha eda) somewhere on the trunk and not only on the leaders. Grafting is an alternative and I have done this when necessary.

everything above the origianl chop (beheading) needs to be kept small. Prune to first node always. Continue pruning continually during branch building or straight segments will ruin your form. Wire for direction and not so much for shape. Reserve shaping to directional pruning or it will look terribly man made.

I commend you on the chop, I have no idea why so many continue to work on taller less attractive trees when a really good smaller tree can be made from a good base.

Cheers, Al
 

bwaynef

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Re: New Trident full of options
« Reply #22 on: November 20, 2010, 04:48 PM »
If you really want to develop a trident that is small, powerful and compact, take all the wire off (it just stresses cells and slows down growth) and let the leader on the left full reign, probably two years or more. That will smooth out the transition. Branch building is not going to take place on that leader anyway. It's just too high.
When you mention "the leader on the left" and "It's just too high" are you talking about the thin branch w/ 1 coil of wire on it growing to the left?

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When the leader is at the point that a smooth transition is achieved it will be saw about 3/8 to 1/2 inch above the beheading. This should be done in spring right at bud break. At that point you will get a good flush of buds no only at the chop for transition but also good buds on the trunk. You need that great branch (sasha eda) somewhere on the trunk and not only on the leaders. Grafting is an alternative and I have done this when necessary.
I think here you're talking about cutting it 1/2" above where I just cut it ...after there's a smooth transition.  I'll keep that in mind.  I would've thought I'd keep more of that trunk section, ...but I see what you're saying.

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everything above the origianl chop (beheading) needs to be kept small. Prune to first node always. Continue pruning continually during branch building or straight segments will ruin your form. Wire for direction and not so much for shape.
Good stuff here.  Re: wiring for direction & pruning for shape, I've noticed that on several threads you've posted and meant to ask you about that.  Thanks for confirming it for me.

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I commend you on the chop, I have no idea why so many continue to work on taller less attractive trees when a really good smaller tree can be made from a good base.
As I mentioned earlier in the thread when others suggested I do exactly what I just did, I really want the best tree possible.  Hopefully I have time on my side, but I thank you (and others) for advice that is invaluable to me.   I really appreciate it.

Two more questions, the branch that's growing (from the trunk) to the right:  Just let it grow ...or should it be groomed for a future branch?  Also, this tree was repotted the spring before I started this thread (Spring '09 I believe).  The soil doesn't look awful, but I've never allowed a trident to go 3 years between pottings.  I've noticed in other threads 3 years is approaching the limit you let tridents go w/o repotting.  Should I wait on this one as well?
« Last Edit: November 20, 2010, 04:55 PM by bwaynef »
 

akeppler

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Re: New Trident full of options
« Reply #23 on: November 20, 2010, 08:14 PM »
I have a whole slug of pictures to add to this thread as well as more info. Have a aThanksgiving party to go to so will add late night.

Three years is optimum for repot. Just use a real granular mix, and lots of fertilizer. This is when high nitrogen is a plus. At this time you want growth and this is a benifit. Later on you can cut back more. Believe it or not I actually fertilized with steer manure as I grew mine out as well as those I am working on now. Just layed tulle (wedding veil netting) on the soil surface and placed it right on the soil. 60 days only! Then just pick up the mess (tulle) and throw it away.
 

MatsuBonsai

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Re: New Trident full of options
« Reply #24 on: November 22, 2010, 04:01 PM »
Steer manure?  I bet your neighbors are as fond of you as they are of me and my fish emulsion.
 

JRob

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Re: New Trident full of options
« Reply #25 on: November 22, 2010, 09:40 PM »
Al,

Ok I'll bite. Steer are castrated male cattle. Is their manure better than other types? Why so specialized?

JRob
 

John Kirby

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Re: New Trident full of options
« Reply #26 on: November 22, 2010, 10:41 PM »
Because it tends to be scraped up out of feed/dry lots (concentrated animal feeding operations). As most americans prefer their beef  to not be from cows or bulls (old, tougher, less juicy individuals), they like to think of their beef as coming from steers- let's them avoid thinking about virgin cow (aka heifer) slaughter. Your poo probably has a mixture of genders and ages. See what you learn with 5 years in South Dakota?
 

John Kirby

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Re: New Trident full of options
« Reply #27 on: November 22, 2010, 10:44 PM »
Hopefully the last post won't be viewed as scatological or full of BS (thet aren't steers).
 

akeppler

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Re: New Trident full of options
« Reply #28 on: November 22, 2010, 11:09 PM »
Actually, 99 percent of all beef for human comsumption comes from bulls. We don't eat cows in America. We milk them.

Thats just what it says on the bag. I don't really think it really matters which gender it somes from as long as it's composted.
 

Grog

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Re: New Trident full of options
« Reply #29 on: November 23, 2010, 02:42 AM »
Love threads like this, full of good information.  These what-the-heck-do-I-do-with-this-raw-stock discussions are what I have to focus on for the most part.  I just came inside from doing some final sealing on my winter storage shed, 18 degrees are the projected low for the night, we'll see if it's sealed tight enough for the tridents. 

On a different note there's only a couple breeds of cattle that are kept for milk.  Beef cattle are much more numerous and their females are slaughered along with the guys.