Author Topic: My First Trident  (Read 10902 times)

Don Blackmond

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Re: My First Trident
« Reply #15 on: December 06, 2011, 08:35 AM »
@ robert help me understand the function of the fine sand so that i can use it when applicable. Im assuming its recommended on other species that do not have any or many roots

stays moist and its easy for new roots to push through; downside is aeration is not as good as coarse material, but coarse does not stay moist nearly as well.
 

John Kirby

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Re: My First Trident
« Reply #16 on: December 06, 2011, 10:35 AM »
Perlite is superior for a couple of reasons, well 3, it is lighter, it allows for aeration and rapid root growth, it is clean, in that you have no chance of getting a toxic salt load as in some sands. However, if you sre going to essentially bare root a tree, why not just put into areasonable bonsai mix? It will certainly work.
 

Chrisl

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Re: My First Trident
« Reply #17 on: December 06, 2011, 11:20 AM »
Plus, I have to wonder if any root damage was being done while moving the pot as that is an extr. flexible pot that could easily break off new roots.  Just an added thought.
 

Don Blackmond

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Re: My First Trident
« Reply #18 on: December 06, 2011, 12:24 PM »
Plus, I have to wonder if any root damage was being done while moving the pot as that is an extr. flexible pot that could easily break off new roots.  Just an added thought.

except that its a trident, which means you could pull it from the pot, beat it against the wall, stuff it back in the pot, and it would keep growing....  ;D
 

John Kirby

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Re: My First Trident
« Reply #19 on: December 06, 2011, 12:39 PM »
I quote Howard Smith from Dallas " at the end of time there will be two survivors left, cockroaches and trident maples".
 

Chrisl

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Re: My First Trident
« Reply #20 on: December 06, 2011, 05:31 PM »
That's very funny guys!  I knew they were hardy, but not THAT hardy  ;D 
 

jacksmom

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Re: My First Trident
« Reply #21 on: December 07, 2011, 10:40 AM »
I wish tridents were hardy enough to winter outside in Minnesota, zone 4.  Anyone know of a trident maple or other maple that could be used for bonsai that is zone 4 hardy?
 

John Kirby

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Re: My First Trident
« Reply #22 on: December 07, 2011, 11:09 AM »
Amur Maple. Hedge Maple, Acer campestre, many grown as beautiful bonsai in Northern Europe, can be the trident of the northlands, as with everything needs some protection in winter if it is in a pot. John
 

Don Blackmond

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Re: My First Trident
« Reply #23 on: December 07, 2011, 12:38 PM »
I leave some of my tridents outside all year here in Michigan.  I just set the pot directly on the ground.  Snow buries the pots and insulates them from sun and wild temperature fluctuations.  They do fine.
 

Jerry Norbury

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Re: My First Trident
« Reply #24 on: December 08, 2011, 04:24 PM »
I was also going to say Amur Maple and Field Maple- because I live in Northern Europe!...

We don't actually get the severe winters in my bit of Northern Europe (Amsterdam) due to our proximity to the North Sea which is warmed by the Gulf stream.

I personally prefer Acer Campestre/Field maple due to the smaller leaves. I have mostly shohin sized trees so it matters to me.
 

jacksmom

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Re: My First Trident
« Reply #25 on: December 08, 2011, 04:42 PM »
Thanks for the suggestions, I appreciate it!   I will look into those options.  Gives me something to ponder over the winter.  Perhaps next year, I may winter a trident with my other trees outside in Minnesota.

 With those, I bury them in the dirt, cover the top of the pots with gardening fabric, put more dirt on top, surround them with a fence of gardening fabric to prevent wind damage and pray that we don't get a week or more of double digit below zero weather.
 

John Kirby

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Re: My First Trident
« Reply #26 on: December 08, 2011, 05:15 PM »
If you want to try and grow some of your own, www.treeshrubseeds.com has very nice pricing on seeds. I have purchased many, many lbs of maple seeds from them over the years, with great success. $4 or 5 of Acer campestre seed will give you enough seedlings to share with all of your friends, relatives, fellow club members and enemies if you so choose. Beats paying $5 for a seedling that was started from the same seed source last year.

John
 

Jerry Norbury

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Re: My First Trident
« Reply #27 on: December 08, 2011, 05:42 PM »
Plus they grow fast and can be chopped back as low as you want.
 

jacksmom

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Re: My First Trident
« Reply #28 on: December 09, 2011, 10:02 AM »
Wow, thanks for the source for seeds.  Great options with a lots to read and learn. 
 

Jerry Norbury

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Re: My First Trident
« Reply #29 on: December 09, 2011, 03:33 PM »
Here's my smallest Acer Campestre...