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Author Topic: May 2012 Work of the Month  (Read 2101 times)
Don Dunn
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« Reply #15 on: December 28, 2012, 12:36 AM »

Thank you both and every one else that  lends a hand to an old dog trying some new tricks. It really means a lot to be able to ask people that know so much more than I do a question and get a good answer without making me fell like a fool for asking.
You have all been great.
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nathanbs
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« Reply #16 on: December 28, 2012, 01:12 AM »

Yes, Don, that is how that zelkova was created to begin with.  It was cut straight across the top.  Then, it budded out, and nine branches grew out.  Unfortunately, they did not properly bind the new bases, and the unsightly bulge was created.  At some time, it was airlayered on the bottom.  Wonderful radial roots system was created.  That's the best part of this tree.  My work on the roots is an attempt to make them even better, and create a "plate" nebari.

After beginning Boon's Intensive classes, I've set my standards higher.  I'm no longer satisfied with mediocre bonsai, and I'm striving to create top quality.  If that means "starting over", c'est la vie!

Adair is binding really the solution or is it just controlling the amount of shoots that eminate from the flat cut? 9 is way too many! I am working on an elm that I kept about 5 I think and so far so good no bulging. I don't think it's any different than the typical concern of too much energy through any one place creating reverse taper. They need to be spaced out a bit so they have room to grow without pushing each other out of the desired picture. I am curious and anxious to know the source of the binding technique. Maybe my project is just too early in the stages of development and I could use the binding technique as well
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Don Dunn
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« Reply #17 on: December 28, 2012, 02:55 AM »

If Elm trees bud so well from the top then could you purchase a 5 gallon tree and every year take a new broom from it? If so then each year you would get a larger trunk as you work your way down the tree. That seems to good to be true, so what's the catch?
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nathanbs
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« Reply #18 on: December 28, 2012, 09:43 AM »

You could take more than one at a time. I bought a huge cork elm that I am layering into about 5-6 trees. I did an experimental layer on a side branch first and then i was chicken to do more than 2 layers this last year but will likely do 3 more this next spring as all 3 that I have done so far have rooted well.
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Adair M
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USDA Hardiness: 7B

« Reply #19 on: December 28, 2012, 02:21 PM »

Nathan,

I don't think 9 would be too many.  I didn't do the original chop, but it appears to my eye, it was a straight chop, and not a V chop.  I think a V helps to reduce the bulging outwards.  (I need to do more research.)  Perhaps hollowing out the V, and/or multiple V cuts all around the trunk.

Boon showed me an article in a Japanese language magazine where it appears to have about 20 new branches grow from the chop!  Maybe even more.  But it appears the aftercare is important.  It looks like the trunk was bound, and the new branches bound so that any swelling was directed inward as they grew.  They were allowed to grow two or three feet tall, getting as big around as a pencil, then cut back to 1 or 2 inches, and the process was started over again.

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Don Dunn
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« Reply #20 on: December 28, 2012, 02:27 PM »

I guess I'll be looking to purchase myself an Elm trees, I like experimenting anyhow.
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nathanbs
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« Reply #21 on: December 28, 2012, 05:51 PM »

Nathan,

I don't think 9 would be too many.  I didn't do the original chop, but it appears to my eye, it was a straight chop, and not a V chop.  I think a V helps to reduce the bulging outwards.  (I need to do more research.)  Perhaps hollowing out the V, and/or multiple V cuts all around the trunk.

Boon showed me an article in a Japanese language magazine where it appears to have about 20 new branches grow from the chop!  Maybe even more.  But it appears the aftercare is important.  It looks like the trunk was bound, and the new branches bound so that any swelling was directed inward as they grew.  They were allowed to grow two or three feet tall, getting as big around as a pencil, then cut back to 1 or 2 inches, and the process was started over again.



I guess it wouldn't be how many but more importantly how big each one is allowed to get. I believe a straight cut is the way to go and the only binding or tying I heard of is that you tie the branches upward. Imagine putting hair in a ponytail on top of your head, more or less. I always thought that the were tied upward only to direct their growth for the esthetics of the broom but maybe it is also for the bulging issue
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