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Author Topic: Shohin Repotting 2013 Part 2 Kotobuki JBP & 2 Itoigawa  (Read 1716 times)
JRob
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« on: February 16, 2013, 03:30 PM »

Here are a few more also done this morning.

JRob
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bwaynef
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« Reply #1 on: February 16, 2013, 08:19 PM »

Why were these potted so high?
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bigDave
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« Reply #2 on: February 16, 2013, 09:09 PM »

St. Louis floods perhaps...

 :-\f

The piney (tiny-pine) is a bit high , seems j-robs style is high and tight

shimps are okay...

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JRob
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« Reply #3 on: February 16, 2013, 10:05 PM »

Thanks for the comments all.

These pots are very small. For example the JBP is in a pot that measures 3-3/4"X 2-3/4" and is just shy of 3/4" deep. The first Shimpaku is in a pot of similar depth with the oval about 4-1/2" X 3-3/4. All three are japanese imports and the portion above the soil line is how they were planted when I received them and have followed suit when I have repotted them. I have questioned the depth of the JPB with several people (three of which have studied in Japan) and the consensus is always to leave it where it has been. I have looked at many shohin books from Japan and pictures from Albek's collection.  Many are raised and I assume it is because the pots are so shallow and the trees require enough root mass to thrive and survive.

JRob
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Don Blackmond
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« Reply #4 on: February 16, 2013, 10:57 PM »

Why were these potted so high?

the 2 shimps look fine.  The 1st shimp may be a little high but no big deal.  The photo angle creates somewhat of an illusion, imo.  

The jbp apparently was grown that way as it appears to be a cutting that was taken then grown in a deeper pot, with subsequent repottings lowering the soil level rather than developing the upper roots.  jrob can slowly develop the upper roots by taking more off the bottom each repotting, or minimize the upper roots through gradual reduction each repotting until complete removal.  Obviously, its young and still being developed so he has time to decide where to take it.  kotobuki are either layered or cutting grown.  there is generally a lot of root work performed over a long period of time, especially with cutting grown trees.
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JRob
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« Reply #5 on: February 16, 2013, 11:46 PM »

Don,

Thanks for replying. I can not personally thank you enough for all your help since my son and I entered the hobby and I bought my first tree from you late in the fall of 2008. As a matter of fact it was our first shohin and our second tree. It seems like only yesterday. Your help got us off to a great start in building a respectable shohin bonsai collection which as you know was my goal. With your help and the material I that we purchased from you and others we won 1st place ribbons in 2009, 2010, 2011 & 2012 with judging from Tigre Urishibata (Japan), Koji Hiamatsu (Japan), Roy Nagatoshi (CA) and Lindsay Shiba (CA). Simply amazing since we were just starting out. Our club members and others have been wonderful as well and everyone we have come to know. Bonsai is a great group of people and everyone has been extremely helpful and we are very grateful. I have not killed a tree yet and Dave is correct I like them small and tight. It is a feat to keep them thriving here in the midwest, particularly last summer with the long string of days above 100. At the fall Japanese Festival last year I was still able to show a shohin Japanese Maple that I purchased from Jim Doyle a few years ago and it did not have one scorched leaf and it was in a pot 1/2" deep because I continue to follow the advice you gave. We appreciate all your great advice.

Kindest Regards,

JRob
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Don Dunn
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« Reply #6 on: February 17, 2013, 01:21 AM »

Nice trees, I would be proud to add trees like these to my small collection.
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Judy
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« Reply #7 on: February 17, 2013, 08:29 AM »

Jrob or Don, care to share the secret of non scorched JM leaves in the fall of such a hard summer?Huh?

Jrob, sounds like you are living the dream!!!
I like the pine, and Don's ideas for it.
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Owen Reich
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« Reply #8 on: February 17, 2013, 04:34 PM »

I feel the Shimpaku in image 2073 is no good.  Please mail to me and I'll dispose of it for you.....  Wink
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Don Blackmond
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« Reply #9 on: February 17, 2013, 05:07 PM »

Jrob or Don, care to share the secret of non scorched JM leaves in the fall of such a hard summer?Huh?

Jrob, sounds like you are living the dream!!!
I like the pine, and Don's ideas for it.

I told him to use shallow pans, fill them with sand/fines, and place his shohins in the sand/fines, water everything to keep the soil moist longer and roots cooler during hot weather; and to place them where they get morning sun and afternoon shade or dappled sun.  I'm sure there was more discussion than that but that's probably what he is referring to.


Don,

Thanks for replying. I can not personally thank you enough for all your help since my son and I entered the hobby and I bought my first tree from you late in the fall of 2008. As a matter of fact it was our first shohin and our second tree. It seems like only yesterday. Your help got us off to a great start in building a respectable shohin bonsai collection which as you know was my goal. With your help and the material I that we purchased from you and others we won 1st place ribbons in 2009, 2010, 2011 & 2012 with judging from Tigre Urishibata (Japan), Koji Hiamatsu (Japan), Roy Nagatoshi (CA) and Lindsay Shiba (CA). Simply amazing since we were just starting out. Our club members and others have been wonderful as well and everyone we have come to know. Bonsai is a great group of people and everyone has been extremely helpful and we are very grateful. I have not killed a tree yet and Dave is correct I like them small and tight. It is a feat to keep them thriving here in the midwest, particularly last summer with the long string of days above 100. At the fall Japanese Festival last year I was still able to show a shohin Japanese Maple that I purchased from Jim Doyle a few years ago and it did not have one scorched leaf and it was in a pot 1/2" deep because I continue to follow the advice you gave. We appreciate all your great advice.

Kindest Regards,

JRob

Jeffrey I'm glad you have enjoyed such success.  Keep up the good work and thanks for the kind words.
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JRob
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« Reply #10 on: February 17, 2013, 07:51 PM »

Owen,

Thanks. This is a tree that was in terrible shape when I purchased it - hence a great price. I quickly learned early in my bonsai journey a concept I call buy the trunk. Almost all else can be corrected over time but a poor trunk in my opinion will always remain a poor trunk. In this trunk I thought had real possibilities unfortunately it was neglected for several years and had no top canopy. I've spent a couple years training branches to fill in the void and did my first styling with it with Hagedorn last year. Here is a picture of the tree from October 2011. Its come a long way and I am pleased with its progress.

JRob
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october
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« Reply #11 on: February 25, 2013, 05:35 PM »

All are nice trees. The last juniper is beautiful. To me, it has just the right amount of proportionate deadwood and beautiful movement. In regards to the high planting angles. The truth is that many of the show stopping shohin are planted high up in the pot to allow for an appropriate size pot. Usually, they just moss the mound a little bit to hide this. There really is not much you can do about it. Some shohins are in such small pots, especially in Japan, that it looks like there might not even be a root ball in there. However, probably some are just put in these pots for shows.

Rob

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Chrisl
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« Reply #12 on: February 25, 2013, 08:10 PM »

That is a really nice tree JRob, nice 'rescue' Wink
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