Author Topic: Shohin Olive  (Read 3123 times)

Jeff Lahr

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Shohin Olive
« on: August 28, 2009, 10:20 PM »
I've been working on this olive for about four years. It is currently about 8.5 inches tall, but will easily be under eight inches when I cut it back next spring. I'm having some problems trying to thicken the branches and to induce some back budding since all of the growth is at the ends of branches.

(I took this photo near sunset with fires blazing to the north and south of me and it caused a red cast to the photo.)
« Last Edit: August 28, 2009, 10:21 PM by Jeff Lahr »
 

clrosner

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Re: Shohin Olive
« Reply #1 on: October 04, 2009, 07:13 PM »
Jeff:
What kind of olive is your tree?  It does not seem to have the growth pattern of  a Black Olive nor the type of leaves on a Olive europa??

If it was my tree in the spring I might defoliate it, and give it a chance to do a lot of back budding!!
 

bwaynef

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Re: Shohin Olive
« Reply #2 on: October 04, 2009, 08:39 PM »
Looks like Olea europea to me.  The leaves show  little hard water (or something else??) though. 

I'd cut it back hard in spring.  That might mean a defoliation, or it might not.  The 2nd main branch growing to the left could go to accentuate the movement of the trunk, which will look more impressive once you chop it back.
 

John Kirby

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Re: Shohin Olive
« Reply #3 on: October 04, 2009, 09:10 PM »
Good call Wayne, tha could be a really-really 5-51/2" tall tree. Thanks for posting Jeff. John
 

Jeff Lahr

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Re: Shohin Olive
« Reply #4 on: October 06, 2009, 11:01 PM »
Wayne, good call on the species and on the hard water. I've been considering cutting back the branch you mention. I'll have to create a virtual during the long winter nights and check it.

Thanks for the responses.
 

Attila Soos

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Re: Shohin Olive
« Reply #5 on: October 07, 2009, 06:05 PM »
Just make sure that you don't cut back in the early spring, but rather later, in June, or after. Olives really take off when the weather gets on the hot side. I actually re-pot them late June, or July, that's when here in So. Cal gets really warm. Olives hate to be messed with when too cold, but they thrive when it gets hot. This is the opposite of what you would do with temperate trees.

(I have a few of this variety that you've posted, the only thing I regret about them is that the leaves don't really get much smaller. This the the domesticated variety, that they use in agriculture for fruiting.
The really great one is the wild variety, with leaves a quarter of the size of this one, and really tiny internodes. That's what we call the African wild olive. Here in my area it is not too hard to get hold of those, there are quite a few vendors selling them. They also easily propagate through cuttings.)
« Last Edit: October 07, 2009, 06:11 PM by Attila Soos »