Author Topic: Shimpaku tanuki  (Read 4211 times)

october

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Shimpaku tanuki
« on: July 08, 2010, 07:13 PM »
Hello all,
This is a tanuki that was done in a wrokshop a few months ago. The tree is about 7 inches tall.

Rob
 

shimsuki

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Re: Shimpaku tanuki
« Reply #1 on: July 08, 2010, 07:29 PM »
Good start, and welcome to the forum.


Shim
 

bwaynef

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Re: Shimpaku tanuki
« Reply #2 on: July 08, 2010, 07:30 PM »
Wow.  I really like the fact that you have instant age.  I don't own any tanuki, but I can appreciate them when they look natural, ...and this one certainly does.  I'm sure there are areas where, if you know what you're looking for, you can see that this is a tanuki.  How long do you think it'll be before that becomes "seamless"?  Also, what'd you use to join the living and deadwood?
 

JamieR

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Re: Shimpaku tanuki
« Reply #3 on: July 09, 2010, 06:45 AM »
very nice Rob :)

i can appreciate a good tanuki, not normally a fan of them but this one is a corker, getting the right piece of drift wood is key :)

i actually aquired some mopani wood, it is used for aquariums and terrariums mostly and made a couple um myself, it come up ok, when it fills out properly it will be better :)

very nice mate, i like this one :)
 

John Kirby

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Re: Shimpaku tanuki
« Reply #4 on: July 09, 2010, 07:42 AM »
Very nice. Can you see where the live vein comes out of the soil?

Wayne, Jim Gremel does a great little tanuki worshop. He was usinf super glue and blasting sand to hold the little junipers into the grooves that he carved into the driftwood. The glue sand mix was used to make a lip to hold the tree at key points. The trick was to put a drop of super glue (quick drying) and then add the sand. I believe that he was usinf wire and rubber pads to stablize the trunk to the deadwood while the glue sand bridges were drying and curing. John
 

october

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Re: Shimpaku tanuki
« Reply #5 on: July 09, 2010, 03:30 PM »
Thanks everyone for the nice comments...

Hello bwaynef... This tree was done in a workshop. Actually, my teacher and I colaborated on this... I chose the driftwood, my teacher carved most of the channeling and attached the tree with 2 brass screws. I potted the tree and did all the styling work. It is a very small composition, for a phoenix graft that is.

One thing I did do even before the tree was attached, was to size up and put the tree right up against the wood and roughly bend the young tree's branches where they would go.. This way, after the tree was attached, I pretty much knew where all the branches would be. Basically, I designated a first branch, second branch, third branch and an apex...Also, there are many small back branches, so if you are looking at it from the baqck, it almost looks like a entire living tree.

Hello jamie111.. Thank you very much...I figured on doing a small phoenix graft because most of the ones you see are somewhat large.. Also, since it is so small, it will fill in quick.

Hello John....That is very interesting about the super glue.. You know, I had wondered if anyone had used superglue to create a phoenix graft...Here is a sort of x ray pic.. The blue is what the young tree looks like behind the wood. The tree is attached to the side and can be seen, slightly starting at about 1 inch above the soil.

Rob
 

MatsuBonsai

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Re: Shimpaku tanuki
« Reply #6 on: July 09, 2010, 03:40 PM »
I had wondered if that were the main (live) trunk bridging the gap between the deadwood.
 

John S

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Re: Shimpaku tanuki
« Reply #7 on: February 17, 2012, 12:19 AM »
Nice looking tree, did you use anything to preserve the deadwood? I'm looking into doing one myself and want to make sure it's going to hold up to the elements. I live in Portland, Oregon and it rains a lot  ;)
 

Owen Reich

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Re: Shimpaku tanuki
« Reply #8 on: February 17, 2012, 10:49 PM »
I personally do not like Tanuki bonsai, but for home enjoyment, nobody else's opinion really matters anyway right  :)?   The raccoon/badger mythical beast is interesting  ;D.  I think this is a nice piece of work though.  More believable than most especially for the size.  If it is possible, I'd reconnect the whip to the right pointing Jin about halfway up the tree.  The "hole" between deadwood and whip is a no-no as it is not realistic looking.  The whip ideally should hug the edge of the deadwood.  The whip may thicken eventually to fill the gap.
 

october

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Re: Shimpaku tanuki
« Reply #9 on: March 29, 2012, 06:17 PM »
Sorry for the late replies.. Hello John S..Unfortunatley most of the wood for the workshop had not been pre treated. Either this year or the next, I will probably separate the whip and the wood and preserve it.

Hello Owen,,I agree with everything you said... There has been so much bending done that I thought it might not be wise to bend it more at that time. I will probably bend it more in the future.

Here is a pic of the tree at the end of last season.