Author Topic: Amur Maple  (Read 14212 times)

bwaynef

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Amur Maple
« on: July 01, 2009, 11:08 AM »
I grew this tree from seed about 3 or 4 years ago now.  I had it potted in a cheap plastic 10" colander and its growth had really taken off.  It was long and lanky and I let the roots get away from me.  I hated how it looked until finally, in july of 2007 (I think) I hacked it way back.  I hacked the top and the roots and put it into a little 4" terracotta pot.  It would either live or I'd have a good reason to get rid of it.  (I don't recommend repotting/root pruning in July.)

To spite me, this tree popped tons of low buds and started developing leaves and branches.  That late fall/winter I chose which of those branches I wanted to use, and after removing the others, wired them into place.

I've been warned that amurs drop branches on a whim, so I'm a little hesitant to defoliate it again this season (after having done just that in early april).  I'll try to get naked pictures of it so that you can see the movement in the trunk.  I'd speculate this one could be classed as mame after it gets pruned back into shape.  If not, it'd probably be on the small end of shohin.  I'm shooting for a finished height of no more than about 5-6".
 

Rick Moquin

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Re: Amur Maple
« Reply #1 on: July 01, 2009, 02:09 PM »
I've been warned that amurs drop branches on a whim
It has been my experience as well
 

bwaynef

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Re: Amur Maple
« Reply #2 on: July 01, 2009, 02:20 PM »
Here are pictures from about a month after the chop.  Sorry about the watermark.
 

ken duncan

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Re: Amur Maple
« Reply #3 on: July 08, 2009, 08:15 AM »
Hay Wayne, I think You have done good job with this one it should be very nice in a few years down the road.
I have not had good luck with Amur Maples in the past myself but this one looks very healthy, maybe your location closer to the Mountains is better for the health of this Northerner.
Ken   
 

bwaynef

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Re: Amur Maple
« Reply #4 on: January 30, 2010, 10:11 PM »
We don't get snow/ice too often.  Since we're covered in the stuff ...and I haven't taken pictures of this one in a while, ....well, you'll see.
 

Jay Wilson

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Re: Amur Maple
« Reply #5 on: January 30, 2010, 11:59 PM »
Cool little tree...
 

Jay

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Re: Amur Maple
« Reply #6 on: January 31, 2010, 06:27 AM »
Wayne, I like this little one. Amur Maples are tough they will come through this cold spell and keep on ticking.

I also have one but have not heard about the dropping branches on a whim. Mine is developing slowly but no lost branches in the three years.

J
 

bwaynef

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Re: Amur Maple
« Reply #7 on: January 31, 2010, 08:20 AM »
I haven't experienced any dropped branches, only warned that they have a penchant for dropping them.  This one is pretty small so I hope it doesn't decide to drop branches.

The outer pot is 6" if I recall correctly.  The inner one (hidden by ice/snow) is about 4" I believe.
 

ChrisM

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Re: Amur Maple
« Reply #8 on: January 31, 2010, 10:36 AM »
nice little tree wayne!!
 

bwaynef

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Re: Amur Maple
« Reply #9 on: March 29, 2010, 12:48 PM »
So, both of those pots cracked during (rather, right after) the ice displayed in the previous pictures.  I had this nice pot laying around w/o a tree in it.  Its a little deep as a display pot, but should give me some breathing room w/ this tree during the summer months (when it got a little ragged looking last year).

 

rockm

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Re: Amur Maple
« Reply #10 on: March 29, 2010, 01:51 PM »
Nice little amur.

I've got two forest plantings of this species. One old, one only 15 years old. They are pretty tough customers.

Both of the forests were buried completely under snow until the beginning of March--I had intentionally provided no mulch for the winter to prevent early bud break--which has begun as early as Feb. 2 in the past. Both were simply put out on the ground in the backyard. At the height of the two blizzards this winter, the plantings had accumulated 5 1/2 feet of snow on top of them. Right before the snow set it, the trees were exposed to a row of low single digit nighttime temps. The snow, as it melted, pulled thumb diameter (and a little thicker) primary trees , completely to the ground in a tight "u" shaped arc. They didn't break--at least not completely--a couple lost their apex and one or two bigger branches. Both plantings are budding out profusely right now, as if the hard winter never happened.
 

MatsuBonsai

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Re: Amur Maple
« Reply #11 on: August 03, 2010, 04:39 PM »
I love the pic of this encased in ice.  How's it doing during the heat of summer?
 

bwaynef

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Re: Amur Maple
« Reply #12 on: August 04, 2010, 08:42 AM »
Its doing pretty well.  I experimented with defoliating it, except for the sacrifice growing out the top.  I got new, smaller, prettier leaves like I'd hoped.  It just didn't fill in as fully as I'd have liked.  Also, it looks like growth has pretty much halted.  I haven't seen any extension on the sacrifice in a month or so.  Tridents and Japanese Maples right next to it, on the other hand, are growing wild.

I'll update with a picture soon.


Anyone else with amurs?  Care to commiserate or share notes?
 

John Kirby

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Re: Amur Maple
« Reply #13 on: August 04, 2010, 08:22 PM »
I have a couple of stumps that seem to do the same thing when we get really hot, but they have grown a bit in the fall when the temps drop....

John
 

rockm

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Re: Amur Maple
« Reply #14 on: August 05, 2010, 08:24 AM »
Amurs are native to Northern China, Manchuria and Siberia I think. In other words, the species LOVES cooler weather. It is considered an invasive plant in the Northeast and Northern Midwest.

In hot southern summers, however, it slows considerably. I've had many of these for years here in Va. They always slow down their otherwise rampant growth in July and August. They also almost always devleop some kind of leaf spot because of the high humidity levels. This doesn't really affect them all that much, but can look bad.

I leave my Amurs out on the benches all winter with no shelter. They will begin growing in Feb if temps don't stay below 30 F. Makes repotting them a chore.