Author Topic: After 33 years - my first Procumbens Nana...  (Read 7708 times)

Jerry Norbury

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After 33 years - my first Procumbens Nana...
« on: May 17, 2010, 05:47 PM »
Procumbens Nana are somewhat of an American phenomenon, I think. In Europe, we don't get a lot of them - not at specialist bonsai places and only rarely in garden centres. Anyway, recently I took part in an online competition on a UK Bonsai board to style a "cheap" (sub $25) garden centre shrub into a bonsai.

I surprised myself and actually found a Juniper Procumbens Nana and thought I would share how it turned out. The pot is 10"/25cm across and the final tree size is 7"/18cm high.

Here are the before and after shots - you'll note I have chosen not to repot it at this time.
 

Jay

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Re: After 33 years - my first Procumbens Nana...
« Reply #1 on: May 17, 2010, 05:56 PM »
Jerry, nice work. I appreciate that you will wait to repot. Soooo many nana's are worked and repotted...and....die. You'd think someone would figure it out.

J
 

Jerry Norbury

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Re: After 33 years - my first Procumbens Nana...
« Reply #2 on: May 17, 2010, 06:15 PM »
Thanks. Had it not turned out as nice as it did - I probably would have repotted it  ;D
 

Steven

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Re: After 33 years - my first Procumbens Nana...
« Reply #3 on: May 17, 2010, 10:19 PM »
Sweet looking dude! Very nice work :)
 

boon

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Re: After 33 years - my first Procumbens Nana...
« Reply #4 on: May 20, 2010, 02:35 AM »
this is my opinion.
i will not cut that much off all at once.   ???there is a chance that the tree will die.  i feel that it is safer to do in stages.  I would remove those branches over period of 2-3 years.  i do not like to cut more than 50% off at a time,  especially raw nursery stock like this one.
good luck.
 

Jerry Norbury

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Re: After 33 years - my first Procumbens Nana...
« Reply #5 on: May 20, 2010, 03:04 AM »
Yes - I think you might be right - there's not a lot of new growth on it yet...

Do you think it would help to be in a warm humid greenhouse?

The problem was that I had no idea that this little tree was hiding inside that big bush - so I had to keep removing branches and foliage until it revealed itself.

It was for a competition so I HAD to finish it within a period of 4 weeks - in fact it was done in roughly 3 hours, plus an hour adding the moss and taking pretty pictures  :D

 

bwaynef

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Re: After 33 years - my first Procumbens Nana...
« Reply #6 on: May 20, 2010, 08:15 AM »
I'm not one to contradict Boon on a regular basis (and I'm not really contradicting his *advice*) but I've reduced Junipers in the past by at least this much and they sprang back.  I'm sure it was stressful on the tree, and surely repotting would probably have done it in.  It took an extra year (beyond what I was expecting)to recover.
 

Hotaction

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Re: After 33 years - my first Procumbens Nana...
« Reply #7 on: May 20, 2010, 10:34 AM »
Nice work.  That could end up being a real nice one, and for under $25.

Dave
 

boon

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Re: After 33 years - my first Procumbens Nana...
« Reply #8 on: May 20, 2010, 10:37 AM »
I'm not one to contradict Boon on a regular basis (and I'm not really contradicting his *advice*) but I've reduced Junipers in the past by at least this much and they sprang back.  I'm sure it was stressful on the tree, and surely repotting would probably have done it in.  It took an extra year (beyond what I was expecting)to recover.

that is okay.  everyone starts bonsai differently.  we all prefer different techniques.

i prefer to be on the safe side.  in my bonsai path, i have seen too many good trees both from the demo and workshop die.  or even famous bonsai artists lost their trees after they cut their bonsai.

dealing with dead trees discourage people to grow bonsai. especially new comers.

i have several students who lose every trees from their beginner classes.  several of them almost quit. but after a few years, they have their bonsai in our exhibit.
 
most tropical and deciduous trees can be cut hard.  they will recover.
my approach is that after i finish working on it, it will continue to grow.  it well cause less stress to both the tree and the owner.  and they will not require to be in the Intensive Care Unit after work.
this is my approach.  it also takes less time to complete the tree for the exhibit.

i feel that, i sit and watch a lot of good trees died in the past.  it makes me sad to see that happened.  
participating in these forum may help a few people.  
several of my students here have done it.  that make me happy to see them helping the others.

sincerely,


 

bwaynef

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Re: After 33 years - my first Procumbens Nana...
« Reply #9 on: May 20, 2010, 11:08 AM »
Boon, I'm not recommending differently than you (though I admit I wasn't clear).  It has been my experience that ...I got away with what you're recommending against, once.  The tree lived, so I am hopeful that Jeremy's will do the same.  Having witnessed the stress and additional recovery time imposed on the tree, I'm more of the mind that you seem to be and would NOT recommend that drastic a reduction.
 

boon

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Re: After 33 years - my first Procumbens Nana...
« Reply #10 on: May 20, 2010, 11:38 AM »
Wayne,
i am glad we are on the same path for bonsai.  i just express my feeling.

Jerry,
please keep us posted.
thanks,
 

Jerry Norbury

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Re: After 33 years - my first Procumbens Nana...
« Reply #11 on: May 20, 2010, 12:48 PM »
It's alive as we speak - I've just watered it; it's (relatively) warm outside - 20C/70F. I'll put more photos up as we go along...

I've got a couple more Junipers which you can pass judgement on too, also shohin - another thread I think.
 

Jerry Norbury

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Re: After 33 years - my first Procumbens Nana...
« Reply #12 on: August 16, 2010, 04:56 PM »
Well it's looking very healthy now. I've even had to prune it - just before the photos were taken.

I'm open for design ideas on how to improve the foliage to better define pads and open spaces.

 

bwaynef

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Re: After 33 years - my first Procumbens Nana...
« Reply #13 on: August 16, 2010, 06:29 PM »
This last picture shows that you have some nice roots to work with too.  You don't usually see that on junipers, particularly procumbens.

It certainly looks healthy.  How're you growing it?
 

Jerry Norbury

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Re: After 33 years - my first Procumbens Nana...
« Reply #14 on: August 16, 2010, 06:44 PM »
It's still in the big plastic pot it came in so it has a huge root system in there.
I have it in full sun and it gets watered daily whether it needs it or not.
Not feeding a lot - maybe every couple of weeks.