Author Topic: WHere does Shimpaku strength come from?  (Read 1847 times)

FrankP999

  • Legit New User
  • *
  • Posts: 45
WHere does Shimpaku strength come from?
« on: April 26, 2014, 05:14 PM »
In several of Ryan Neil's videos, he states that the strength of black pine comes from the foliage - i.e. if you cut/prune pine candles/foliage you get more foliage. He says something about juniper being the opposite.

I am curious about the thoughts of you experts on shimpaku. I have two that I bought last year and are doing well. But they are in "nursery soil" not bonsai soil.

Does the strength come from the roots - opposite of pines as Ryan stated?

Thanks for your thoughts and suggestions on how and when  to repot safely into bonsai soil.

Frank
 

0soyoung

  • Full Forum Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 149
  • Thanked: 4 times
Re: WHere does Shimpaku strength come from?
« Reply #1 on: April 26, 2014, 09:05 PM »
In several of Ryan Neil's videos, he states that the strength of black pine comes from the foliage - i.e. if you cut/prune pine candles/foliage you get more foliage. He says something about juniper being the opposite.

I am curious about the thoughts of you experts on shimpaku. I have two that I bought last year and are doing well. But they are in "nursery soil" not bonsai soil.

Does the strength come from the roots - opposite of pines as Ryan stated?

Thanks for your thoughts and suggestions on how and when  to repot safely into bonsai soil.

Frank

All energy in the tree comes from photosynthesis in the foliage (and to a minor extent in the tissue of young twigs). Energy is carbohydrates (i.e., various elementary sugars, primarily sucrose).

IMHO, Ryan is talking about perceptions.

IMHO one can repot just about anything in the spring up to the point that elongation starts (aka 'as the buds swell') or after the season's elongation is complete (which is generally sometime around the end of August and/or start of September in the northern hemisphere).
 

Brian Van Fleet

  • Full Forum Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 205
  • Thanked: 1 times
Re: WHere does Shimpaku strength come from?
« Reply #2 on: April 27, 2014, 08:16 AM »
In the video I watched, Ryan (paraphrased) stated that a black pine's strength comes from roots, and a juniper's strength comes from foliage.  I tend to agree with Osoyoung, "strength" in all trees is adjective and not a noun.  Energy is generated through photosynthesis by all trees.

How I interpreted Ryan's lesson is this: go easy on pine roots, and go easy on juniper foliage.

It will cause problems to work a pine's roots too hard, but at the right time, quite a bit of its foliage can be removed.  Conversely, (see Peter Tea's recent Utah Juniper post, or Kimura's upside-down juniper), you can get a juniper to survive with relatively few roots, as long as you take care of the foliage.