Author Topic: Shohin/Kifu Itoigawa Shimpaku  (Read 10511 times)

John Kirby

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Shohin/Kifu Itoigawa Shimpaku
« on: August 19, 2009, 12:59 PM »
This is a Kifu (maybe shohin if the Jin gets shortened) itoigawa shimpaku that I purchased from Larry Leone in Texas in 2006. It is a very gnarly twisted plant that I have wired, Mike Hagedorn wired and styled in 08 and Akio Kondo wired and styled this month. This tree has always been a bit difficult because it wants to act like a slant or a semicascade and I really want it to be more of an informal upright. The tree has flowed heavily to the right, but each styling has brought it back more to the center. I would like to eventually show this tree, just to have a twisty juniper out there. Anyway, I know some folks are critical of these twisty little devils, calling them contrived, I however view this as a well done, yet highly stylized tree, where the foliage is finally starting to catch up with the trunk.

Any comments or ideas?

John
(Pictures are front, right, back, left, views. Thanks Boon for the nice pictures!).

« Last Edit: August 19, 2009, 01:02 PM by John Kirby »
 

MatsuBonsai

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Re: Shohin/Kifu Itoigawa Shimpaku
« Reply #1 on: August 19, 2009, 01:27 PM »
John,

I really enjoy this tree.  Going from the feet of the pot, has the front changed?  Are you planning on keeping the left side of the tree tight to show the jin(s) peeking through, or do you think you might all it to grow out more?
 

John Kirby

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Re: Shohin/Kifu Itoigawa Shimpaku
« Reply #2 on: August 19, 2009, 03:25 PM »
Yes it is turned about 15-20 degrees. The foliage needs to remain somewhat spare just to keep it from looking to heavy and static.

John
 

AlexV

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Re: Shohin/Kifu Itoigawa Shimpaku
« Reply #3 on: August 19, 2009, 03:57 PM »
I always liked that little tree, but the new styling really sets it off.  Akio did a really nice job.  At the size it is at, it might be really nice accenting a shohin stand.  Not sure what they call the "odd tree out" of a shohin display.  It seems like reducing it to shohin size might end up making the foliage into 1 solid mass, whereas it might stay more broken into pads as a slightly larger tree.

The small twisted Junipers seem to be one of those touch stones, people either love them or hate them depending on if they like stylized trees.  Or to what degree.

Thanks for the pics!

Alex
 

bwaynef

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Re: Shohin/Kifu Itoigawa Shimpaku
« Reply #4 on: April 05, 2010, 03:35 PM »
I've been searching around looking at these yamadori-esque junipers and came to this one.  I reworked the picture and thought I'd share.
 

John Kirby

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Re: Shohin/Kifu Itoigawa Shimpaku
« Reply #5 on: April 05, 2010, 11:23 PM »
Huh?
 

akeppler

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Re: Shohin/Kifu Itoigawa Shimpaku
« Reply #6 on: April 05, 2010, 11:51 PM »
He means he worked on the clarity and color saturation.

This is a fine example of a very fine shohin juniper. Even with the jin I think it's still shohin. Does this cultivar do better more sparse like this? I have one that needs rejuvinating as much of the foilage stalled a few years back due to wrong pinching out of the growing season. Ahh ahh ahh!

Thanks, Al
 

John Kirby

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Re: Shohin/Kifu Itoigawa Shimpaku
« Reply #7 on: April 06, 2010, 08:39 AM »
Al,
Actually have been trying to get the foliage tighter and denser- and as I result I "pinched and pruned" the lightly lignified areas too much, pushing it to juvenile. Repotted it the first week in March, I did my usual moderately aggressive repotting and Boon looked at me and said "not enough" I thought I had taken too much off, then he took the tree and started working up under the base, and out (over the next few minutes) came a small pile of decomposed junk and akadama- so the first half (the front) of the clean out is dones, and the second half will happen the next time it is repotted. I thought I had done a pretty good job when repotting two years ago, obviously I hadn't worked it hard enough. So, I believe that the tree has been sparse due to the fact that I hadn't given it the best chance to grow more effectively ("Being happy in the pot"). I imagine that it will be much denser over the next year or two.

I find this kind of paradoxical in a way, because I always work my pines (by the standards of many in american bonsai) fairly aggressively, and even the collected junipers as well. Now, I have a visual reminder to keep after root health at the base of these little fellows as well.
John
 

bwaynef

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Re: Shohin/Kifu Itoigawa Shimpaku
« Reply #8 on: April 06, 2010, 08:42 AM »
Huh?

I adjusted the "levels" (essentially clarity and saturation as Al said, brightening it and removing the greenish hue) and cropped it closer to the tree.  I may've sharpened it as well (which accounts for its contrasty-ness).

Have any earlier pictures?  I've been reading a lot on the creation of these deadwood yamadori twisty junipers. Any tips?
 

cbobgo

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Re: Shohin/Kifu Itoigawa Shimpaku
« Reply #9 on: April 06, 2010, 03:26 PM »
I like this style of trees as well and have come up with a term for them that I think fits really well:

"cultured yamadori"

- bob
 

John Kirby

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Re: Shohin/Kifu Itoigawa Shimpaku
« Reply #10 on: April 06, 2010, 03:43 PM »
Jim Gremel calls them and the process for making them  "Yamadori in a pot". I think Boon had the fluorecent lights on, added to natural light and possibly some flash- result: Green hue.

JOhn
 

M.B.

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Re: Shohin/Kifu Itoigawa Shimpaku
« Reply #11 on: April 08, 2010, 01:52 PM »
I personally like the back better. It shows a little more of the deadwood (which I love), doesn't have the large "in your face" coil of live vein that I think creates a bit of reverse taper towards the bottom. But then picking a front is one of the hardest things I struggle with in bonsai and pretty much miss the mark everytime.
I love these twisty junipers and yours is beautiful John.
Mary B.
 

John Kirby

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Re: Shohin/Kifu Itoigawa Shimpaku
« Reply #12 on: April 13, 2010, 10:55 PM »
Mary, the range of front's is limited on this tree because of it's forward movement in the trunk, if you wanted to make the back the front, it would be a very significant exercise. This tree was initially being designed by the previous owner to be a strong slant to the right, it is now a better balanced tree as an informal upright. Give it 10 years, it ought to be a pretty good little tree.

John
 

M.B.

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Re: Shohin/Kifu Itoigawa Shimpaku
« Reply #13 on: April 15, 2010, 07:54 PM »
Oh John, I'm sure it will be more than a "pretty good little tree" in your hands. Can't wait to see it progress.
Mary B.
 

akeppler

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Re: Shohin/Kifu Itoigawa Shimpaku
« Reply #14 on: April 16, 2010, 01:04 AM »
Hi John, After reading your post I decided to thin mine out and start over on the foliage pads. Mine had gone juvinile also since I worked it hard over a number of years and did not work it during the correct time of the growing season.

Took off about 2/3 of the foliage and rewired it for shape. The apex had to be reworked since it was growing sideways and had not been wired. Now everything is good to go. Now all I have to do is get it back to the way it used to be. This is Itoigawa also.

Front, left, back and right side.
« Last Edit: April 16, 2010, 01:08 AM by akeppler »