Author Topic: Rehabing a Shimpaku  (Read 2901 times)

Vulcan

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Rehabing a Shimpaku
« on: January 21, 2012, 03:41 PM »
Here is a small shimpaku that I have had since 2002. It was one of those unfortunates that sometimes suffer from a lack of direction and planning and now I'm trying to rehabilitate something half-way respectable as a result. The first three pics. were taken last spring and was the first time I wanted to try and chronicle its progress. One big issue was that I had painted myself into a corner with it's intital styling and in my excitement, ended up jining all of the lowest branches. For most of it's life it suffered from a sort of "mushroom cap" apex and as you can see by the profile shot, the front looks as if it suffered from severe buck-teeth: The shots are from the front, right and rear.
« Last Edit: January 21, 2012, 04:01 PM by Vulcan »
 

Vulcan

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Re: Rehabing a Shimpaku
« Reply #1 on: January 21, 2012, 03:48 PM »
The idea that I've decided to stick with is to keep it with an older informal upright style. I had played around with all sorts of variations, yet I've really had hard time tearing myself away from altering, what seems to me, it's prefered way to go.

In pic. 1 I re-oriented a new apex which meant bringing the branches jutting to the rear up by almost 90 degrees. I stopped where I did since I could feel and hear it cracking even with rafia. Pic 2 after I initially reformed a new apex.
« Last Edit: January 21, 2012, 04:30 PM by Vulcan »
 

Vulcan

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Re: Rehabing a Shimpaku
« Reply #2 on: January 21, 2012, 03:53 PM »
The next pic. shows the tree as it was last summer and the "virt." is a projected idea about reducing the foliage on the bottom R. It's filled out considerably since the last photo. So, I guess I'm in the process of trying to make lemonade out of a lemon I created.

Let me know what you good people think of the overall direction and let me know if you see anything different that may make more sense...it's always good to have more sets of eyes on these things.

With Thanks

John
 

Vulcan

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Re: Rehabing a Shimpaku
« Reply #3 on: January 22, 2012, 06:41 PM »
Here you can see how the foliage pads filled out.

 

bwaynef

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Re: Rehabing a Shimpaku
« Reply #4 on: January 23, 2012, 08:43 AM »
This one looks like its well on its way in this instance of rehab.

Do you have any current(ish) pictures of the back?  In the first series of pictures, I liked the back (or 3rd picture) a little better than the front (1st picture).
 

Vulcan

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Re: Rehabing a Shimpaku
« Reply #5 on: January 23, 2012, 09:13 AM »
Thanks for the reply,

This shot is the clearest of the back; it's about 45 degrees angled to the right...

 

John Kirby

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Re: Rehabing a Shimpaku
« Reply #6 on: January 23, 2012, 09:24 PM »
Nice progress. I would suggest that you remove the old foliage in the fall winter, usually yellowish or just single unbranched foliage, don't pinch just pluck off. Then you can wire out the foliage into foliage pad. good luck!
 

Vulcan

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Re: Rehabing a Shimpaku
« Reply #7 on: January 23, 2012, 10:04 PM »
It has grown a lot of hair and it's getting pom-pomie ;D I really appreciate your input and I'll keep you all up to date.

John
 

boon

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Re: Rehabing a Shimpaku
« Reply #8 on: January 24, 2012, 12:16 AM »
it is weak.  this shimpaku need to be repotted. then let it grow.  remove old foliage.  clean hanging downward shoots.  clipping off the tips, it is not the way to develop it.
 

Vulcan

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Re: Rehabing a Shimpaku
« Reply #9 on: January 24, 2012, 03:39 PM »
Thank you very much Boon for your advice.

I haven't touched the roots in 4 years. It's definately in need of a re-pot and hopefully there are no issues with dead roots; the root ball gives me worry though since it looks really compacted, but I'll have to wait and see when I look at it. It'll take a lot of time, but I think it will do ok in the long run.

With Thanks,

John
 

Vulcan

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Re: Rehabing a Shimpaku
« Reply #10 on: April 06, 2012, 07:25 PM »
Just to give an update.

I repotted the tree last month and was happy to see that the soil was not nearly compacted as I thought may be the case. No root rot and only a few matted feeder roots that I removed back to a healthy junction. I trimmed back some that were overly long...overall, not more than 20 percent was removed.