Bonsai Study Group Forum

Species Specific => Shimpaku Juniper Bonsai Discussion => Topic started by: boon on October 12, 2009, 01:51 PM

Title: Jim Gremel's shimpaku
Post by: boon on October 12, 2009, 01:51 PM
Jim was a vendor at East Bay Bonsai Society exhibit.  He brought his tree for the exhibit.  i forgot my camera.  this tree was in the pot that was too big.  i asked him to come over and pic a pot.  we picked one and this is it.
he grows this tree from cutting. 14 years old.  he has done a great job.
enjoy,
Boon
Title: Re: Jim Gremel's shimpaku
Post by: bonsaikc on October 12, 2009, 04:52 PM
Wow, I'd sure like to see the process by which he takes the cutting and puts such natural twists and bends in it to make it look like a yamadori shimpaku. His trees are always fantastic!
Title: Re: Jim Gremel's shimpaku
Post by: Ross on October 14, 2009, 11:35 AM
I bet he peeled strips of bark off when it was young and let the tree twist itself up.  This technique is shown in Lindsay Farr's World of Bonsai series 2, episode 2.

http://www.bonsaifarm.tv/ (http://www.bonsaifarm.tv/)

Title: Re: Jim Gremel's shimpaku
Post by: John Kirby on October 14, 2009, 12:31 PM
Ah, no. He does quite a bit of early wiring, then plants out in the field then after it has reached the size he wants he revisits and starts to develop the shari and jin. I have one from him that I reduced back to the core twisted trunk this year, next year will begin the process of getting the shari started.

John
Title: Re: Jim Gremel's shimpaku
Post by: boon on October 14, 2009, 02:40 PM
Japanese will not tell you everything unless you are students and work side by side with them.
John Kirby is correct.  wiring young whips of shimpaku cutting is the key. 
no wire = no bend = no curve = poor bonsai material
Title: Re: Jim Gremel's shimpaku
Post by: Attila Soos on October 14, 2009, 04:02 PM
So, first the wiring, and later, the shari. That makes sense, since in the earliest stages, when the trunk is very thin, it is too early to create the shari. Wiring is what creates some good curves. Later, when the trunk has some volume, the shari can add to the contorted shape.

Since Ross mentioned the Lindsay Farr video, this is a question that is not related to the shimpaku, but I hope I will be forgiven for asking: There was a black pine growing field with thousand of young black pines. How ofter are they root-pruned? Every 2 to 3 years, or may be they grow much longer before getting root-pruned? Does somebody have any idea how they do this? I prune mine every 3 years, and I thought that it is not a good idea to grow them longer without root-work, but I wonder how they do it in Japan?
Title: Re: Jim Gremel's shimpaku
Post by: somegeek on October 15, 2009, 02:08 PM
I bet he peeled strips of bark off when it was young and let the tree twist itself up.  This technique is shown in Lindsay Farr's World of Bonsai series 2, episode 2.

http://www.bonsaifarm.tv/ (http://www.bonsaifarm.tv/)



Would this method of bark/cadmium layer removal work on pines as well to cause a twist over time?
Title: Re: Jim Gremel's shimpaku
Post by: Ross on October 16, 2009, 01:24 AM
Would this method of bark/cadmium layer removal work on pines as well to cause a twist over time?

I think what Boon and John are saying is that a good early wiring is the important part in making nice bends in the trunk, and that shari just adds to the character.
Title: Re: Jim Gremel's shimpaku
Post by: somegeek on October 16, 2009, 01:27 AM
Ah - thanks - I understand now.   :)
Title: Re: Jim Gremel's shimpaku
Post by: John Kirby on April 06, 2010, 03:50 PM
I know old thread, I ended up buying this tree from Jim Gremel when I was out at the BIB show. It now resides at Boon's and is going to be made a bit more compact over time, with more refined and reduced jins and more shari work. Jim worked on this tree for over 15 years, from striking as a cutting to placing in the show. He sent me a picture of the tree from 4 years agom when he was digging up out of the ground at his place.

John
Title: Re: Jim Gremel's shimpaku
Post by: John Kirby on August 15, 2010, 05:17 PM
This is an updated picture of the Juniper after it was worked on by Daisaku Nomoto from Japan. Daisaku was Boon's senior at Mr. Kamiya's nursery when he was an apprentice. Daisaku has prepared a number  of trees for exhibition at Kokufu-ten (and other major shows) and has trees that have won awards in the show. I was supposed to have Daisaku out to my home this month, but my move to Rhode Island messed up those plans. Anyway, I asked if Daisaku would be willing to work on a couple of trees, this was one of them. The picture is by Jonas Dupuich who is also a BIB member and has the really thoughtful bonsaitonight.com blog.

Big change.

Thoughts?
Title: Re: Jim Gremel's shimpaku
Post by: MatsuBonsai on August 15, 2010, 05:23 PM
John,

I had seen this on Jonas' blog, but had forgotten it was yours.  Looks great!  What more thoughts did Daisaku have?  Any suggestions for a new pot?  The jins seems a bit thick still, did he have any thoughts on them?

Rhode Island?
Title: Re: Jim Gremel's shimpaku
Post by: John Kirby on August 15, 2010, 06:01 PM
John,
You know as much as I do, Daisaku is in California and I am in Rhode Island. The pot is a very nice Japanese pot that when cleaned up is a really nice fit, with the bigger/old version of the tree. It looks thick with the trees sitting at angles on blocks, so will need to see what it looks like in person. I have always thought that a nice oval or blossom shaped pot could work, but it will need to be pretty nice to work.

The jins were too large before, they are going to be refined a good deal, shortened and "thinned" to bring them in scale.

John
Title: Re: Jim Gremel's shimpaku
Post by: shimsuki on August 15, 2010, 09:24 PM
This is an absolutely fantastic tree. Wow, just wow. I know there is no such thing as a 'perfect' bonsai, but this one, from the picture, appears to come close. What an amazing tree. Thanks for sharing, trees like this inspire me a lot.





Regards,
Shimsuki
Title: Re: Jim Gremel's shimpaku
Post by: John Kirby on August 15, 2010, 09:56 PM
Shimsuki,
Other than just liking the tree for its obvious strengths (even when weighed against the things that will need to be improved- the jins for example, etc) the thing I like best about this tree is that it was grown in the US from a cutting by one of the best bonsai people that you will ever meet- Jim Gremel. Jim is spectacularly talented and is amazingly hard working. He has a large number of spectacular trees, many of which he started from seed/cuttings or as grafts that he has completed.

Regardless f how long that I own this tree, this tree will always be "Jim Gremel's Shimpaku".

John
Title: Re: Jim Gremel's shimpaku
Post by: shimsuki on August 15, 2010, 10:45 PM
Shimsuki,
Other than just liking the tree for its obvious strengths (even when weighed against the things that will need to be improved- the jins for example, etc) the thing I like best about this tree is that it was grown in the US from a cutting by one of the best bonsai people that you will ever meet- Jim Gremel. Jim is spectacularly talented and is amazingly hard working. He has a large number of spectacular trees, many of which he started from seed/cuttings or as grafts that he has completed.

Regardless f how long that I own this tree, this tree will always be "Jim Gremel's Shimpaku".

John

I think it makes it more special that it was grown from a cutting. Totally inspiring.


Shim
Title: Re: Jim Gremel's shimpaku
Post by: MatsuBonsai on August 16, 2010, 09:39 AM
John,
You know as much as I do, Daisaku is in California and I am in Rhode Island. The pot is a very nice Japanese pot that when cleaned up is a really nice fit, with the bigger/old version of the tree. It looks thick with the trees sitting at angles on blocks, so will need to see what it looks like in person. I have always thought that a nice oval or blossom shaped pot could work, but it will need to be pretty nice to work.

The jins were too large before, they are going to be refined a good deal, shortened and "thinned" to bring them in scale.

John

I should clarify.  I like the old pot, but figured with the new angle you would likely change the pot as well.  Something Boon has taught us both, change the pot to change up the look and keep it fresh, new, and exciting.  I like the idea of an oval or blossom shape.  Can't wait to see it all cleaned up and ready for show.  Looking better and better.  I'm sorry I too missed Daisaku.  Thanks for sharing!
Title: Re: Jim Gremel's shimpaku
Post by: John Kirby on August 27, 2010, 08:23 AM
There is a thread by Bwaynef, under the general topics heading, on what kind of tree can you develop in to a showable bonsai in three years. Well, this tree took 4, but it did have to be dug out of the ground first, stabilized, then styled. SO if you started with a tree that already had a reasonable root system (for a small container) then why not in three years? This tree went from raw, well developed material, to show tree in 3-4 years. Now this tree doesn't meet the price constraints, but there is very good prebonsai material (not just nursery liners that are transferred into a different pot and called prebonsai...) that can rapidly be turned into showable material, trees that can be shown many times and their improvement noted over time.
Title: Re: Jim Gremel's shimpaku
Post by: John Kirby on August 27, 2010, 08:28 AM
THe photo this time....
Title: Re: Jim Gremel's shimpaku
Post by: Yenling83 on November 10, 2010, 06:02 PM
Wow John, I've really liked the pics I've seen online of this juniper, but I got to see this tree up close at my last intensive and I think the pictures just don't do it justice.   It's soooo nice!  I love it.  Congrats, really beautiful. 
Title: Re: Jim Gremel's shimpaku
Post by: John Kirby on November 10, 2010, 09:03 PM
Thanks,
I think it is so cool that you have been doing the intensives, it is really good to see some talented Californians in the mix- I think Peter was the first. You know, I have yet to see the tree since Daisaku worked on it, new job has kept me on the east coast. Next weekend, workshops and get to see it in between pulling old needled and candle work on  the little pines........

John
Title: Re: Jim Gremel's shimpaku
Post by: MatsuBonsai on November 12, 2010, 07:36 PM
John,

I do hope you'll share some new photos with us.  I really need to get out and see Boon's new place!

Title: Re: Jim Gremel's shimpaku
Post by: John Kirby on November 12, 2010, 10:26 PM
One week from now buddy, I have an address and a GPS....... John
Title: Re: Jim Gremel's shimpaku
Post by: scottroxburgh on November 13, 2010, 08:02 PM
John,

I saw this and a number of your other trees at Boon's. It is amazing how much power can be seen in such a small tree!

This tree has inspired me to get some stock like this started in Australia.
I've got the years left, space to ground grow and cutting stock so Im starting the wiring.

You have a really great collection out at Boon's, it was awesome to see them in person.

Scott
Title: Re: Jim Gremel's shimpaku
Post by: John Kirby on November 13, 2010, 08:43 PM
Scott,
Glad you had a good time. The trees come with time. You going to post any pics from your intensive? John
Title: Re: Jim Gremel's shimpaku
Post by: John Kirby on January 15, 2012, 06:17 PM
OK, was time to get this tree back in to the BIB show, part of the documented sequence of development that the show provides. I wanted this tree to be competitive (the Kifu and Chuhin sized coniferous trees at BIB can be killer). So, I started looking for a pot. Pter Tea was looking at Aichi-en and I looked in the US. Peter found the nice Antique Chinese pot, pictured below, and I purchased it last fall. It measured quite well for a very tightly filled pot, however one the tree was out of its Yamaaki pot (its regular home gaining patina) the roots were just too big and difficult to fit in the pot (the taper from top to bottom ensure the tree wouldn't fit- may be later after a couple of more reductions of old big roots). So, friends in BIB offered up antique pots (Japanese and Chinese) and we selected this nice pot that Jonas Dupuich (bonsaitonight.com) had picked up during his seven week stay in Japan this fall (from, believe it or not, Aichi-en), Jeff S also brought in a couple of tremendous pots that would have been very, very nice as well. I really like the way the tree and pot compliment each other. Daisaku did some deadwood work and got the tree repotted at closer to the final angle- it needs to tip back even further next time. Enjoy, thanks Boon and Daisaku for the opportunity.  (second picture is of Boon and Daisaku taking pictures duering the pot selection process)
Title: Re: Jim Gremel's shimpaku
Post by: Yenling83 on January 16, 2012, 11:41 AM
Looked really amazing at the show!!!  Great job!!!  :)
Title: Re: Jim Gremel's shimpaku
Post by: Chrisl on January 16, 2012, 01:02 PM
That is really nice John!  And a great story behind this tree too!  It'll look even better when you shorten and thin the jins.

From cutting to that size in 15 yrs in ground?  I didn't know Shimpaku's could get that large in 15 yrs.  I bet, using a colander and high ferts, you might be able to get to the same point in 10yrs.

Either way, Jim G. did a fantastic job on developing this stock, and getting it show ready in 4 yrs?  Incredible!
Title: Re: Jim Gremel's shimpaku
Post by: John Kirby on January 16, 2012, 03:42 PM
Chris, I think the jins are where they are going to be. They have been refined significantly, both Daisaku and Akio thought that they should stay relatively long, the benefit of being wired early on and then jinned. It will look better? Well it would look different anyway.

Plant some in colanders and report back in ten years if you can get a 2.5-3" trunk on a wired and pruned shimpaku. Jim does a tremendous job growing in the ground, he really puts the work in to them.
Title: Re: Jim Gremel's shimpaku
Post by: Chrisl on January 16, 2012, 05:02 PM
For me John, and just my preference, would be to shorten them.  But I don't fault anyone for wanting to keep them this long.  Personel preference.

I've been told by more than one person who are far advanced from where I am, and they both said you can get faster growth in a colander and heavy fert than growing in ground for the same period of time.  And if I'm still here on earth in 10 yrs, I will report back as I have 4 rooted cuttings that I can experiment on. 
Title: Re: Jim Gremel's shimpaku
Post by: Yenling83 on January 16, 2012, 08:58 PM
I've been told by more than one person who are far advanced from where I am, and they both said you can get faster growth in a colander and heavy fert than growing in ground for the same period of time.  And if I'm still here on earth in 10 yrs, I will report back as I have 4 rooted cuttings that I can experiment on. 

this is not correct, unless maybe you have really poor soil or don't feed in the ground.  for the most part, if you keep things similar there's no way any type of pot will thicken a trunk like the ground will.  However, I understand if you don't believe me because you can learn some bad info from random replys on bonsai forums. 

Title: Re: Jim Gremel's shimpaku
Post by: John Kirby on January 16, 2012, 11:27 PM
Chrisi, Frank Kroeker and I had a similar conversation, oh 7 or 8 or so years ago. Except, I wasn't thinking about Kifu or Chuhin trees, I was thinking Shohin. I had read all these good Japanese articles about raising shohin JBP in Colanders (and Sonare and Shimpaku). Frank is a talented tree grower, and he lived (at the time) in about the perfect place to grow tridents, JBP, Shimpaku, Tosho and Sonare- just south of Oklahoma City. 250-270 growing days a year, strong well, inline fertilization system, etc. I was going to blow his doors off growing pants in colanders in Fayetteville Arkansas, max push fertilizers and water. Well, Frank bought a few hundred colanders from me (from the 1200 or so I bought), put ultra fast draining soil, fertilized and watered the daylights out of them and treated his in ground trees as he normally would- fertilize periodically, water periodically and mulch. Needless to say the trees in the ground have been dug, potted and sold, the trees in the colanders, well, are still in the colanders.

Mine too. May be in a climate like Chicago with its long cold winters and cool springs and mixed summers Colanders can work better. But a talented grower willing to get on their knees and do the wiring and pruning, and who was willing to do the root work up front before the trees went in the ground- no comparison. Now if you just let your trees go, who knows.

So, grow your four cuttings in colanders, I hope you get the tremendous growth and development that you are looking for. If you want some trees we have 800 plus in the ground waiting to be dug, some of them will have bases bigger than colanders after 8 years (and to be completely honest, many won't) and I didn't water or fertilize in the ground the past 6 years.

T-Town Bonsai, you have anything to add to the conversation?
Title: Re: Jim Gremel's shimpaku
Post by: Chrisl on January 17, 2012, 11:58 AM
Great story John!  Thanks for sharing.  Glad to hear others have already compared the two growing methods.  But bummed about the conclusion ;)  Well then, perhaps I'll take two of my cuttings and plant them in the ground and two for the colander.  This way I'll have all my bases covered LOL  I have room to try, so why not.

Also, interesting thought about local climates and growing days.  Hadn't thought of that.  250 growing days is hard to beat...as  long as theres water (thinking OK.) these days. 

Oh, you have 800 in the ground?  Holy smokes!  One, I'm envious ;)), and two, boy does that sound like a ton of work!!
Thanks for the interesting conversation John!  And Thanks for jumping in too Yenling!
Title: Re: Jim Gremel's shimpaku
Post by: T-Town Bonsai on January 17, 2012, 12:24 PM
Thank you John,
I saw this and thought "I've heard that before".  I sold seedlings to BBN several years ago and was told the same thing.  But they were going to grow in nursery pots and get the same results as growing in the ground.  Didn't even come close.  
Here are some examples of trees that are all about the same age.  The colander grown trees are on the right side.  The one in the orange pot may be a little older but not more than 3 years.  And it has been in this pot since 2009, so if it had been left in the ground it would be even larger.  The short stubby one is younger than the tree on the right.  It was styled by Suthin last spring.  The third one also styled by Suthin is probably the same age as the one next to it.

When I was in OK the field trees mostly relied on Mother nature for water.  I did water in the really dry times but I would guess not more than 10 times a year.  The trees in the pots were fertilized everyday with a 28-8-18 water soluble at 200ppm and I also top dressed with organic cakes and osmote.  Many thought that was excessive but it worked for me.
These are the results I got, the trees in the field just grew faster and had better bark.  
I will add that all the trees that went into the field were first wired and trunks shaped.  I mulched all the trees with wood chips.  This made it easier to keep the weeds under control.  I have seen too many fields with weeds taller than the trees which shades out the bottom branches usually killing them.

We are now looking for a new place to live and I hope to be able to field grow again.  I have hundreds of pines that were only in the ground a couple of years before we moved and now are in 6" pots.  Just won't get so carried away and grow so many.  
Title: Re: Jim Gremel's shimpaku
Post by: T-Town Bonsai on January 17, 2012, 12:46 PM
Here are two more pictures.  The two trees are close in age.  The one on the left is growing on a tile and field grown.  It was growing in a colander for several years but I wanted faster growth so I planted it in the ground.  You can see a corner of the tile in the second picture.  All the colander trees are on tiles.
 
It is a lot easier to grow in pots, you can pick them up and have a look at their progress it's not as convenient to crawl around on the ground trying to see what's going on.  And I have a few trees that look like I forgot them for sometime and they are not very good.  But that is why you grow a lot.  

So I guess for me the faster tree grew in the ground.  

Remember when I said to keep the weeds out,  look at those bottom branches.
Title: Re: Jim Gremel's shimpaku
Post by: John Kirby on January 17, 2012, 05:48 PM
Now, I still believe that you can grow a shohin to a finished tree faster in the colander than in the ground, but it is going to be due to the fact that the roots should be more amenable to a small pot and the scale (trunk size and height) will be greatly reduced.
Title: Re: Jim Gremel's shimpaku
Post by: Chrisl on January 17, 2012, 07:10 PM
T-Town Bonsai, Thank You so much for taking the time for posting such a detailed and informative note!  Well done! I learned a lot!
And well, the pictures speak for themselves don't they? ;)  "Wow", the difference is not insignificant.    The bark looks much more developed/mature with the in ground trees!  Nice.

"I will add that all the trees that went into the field were first wired and trunks shaped"

So T-Town, do you mind if I ask a few questions?  So you wire the trunk for shape on the seedlings first off, and then plant them right?  And do you let them grow untouched for fast trunk development, and then prune back hard to start developing the primary branching after the trunk has attained the right size?   
Or, do you decide on making the primary branches after the trunk has attained the right proportion, and then wire the decided upon primary branches?...so it's a gradual process?
I hope this makes sense.

Oh, how would you accomodate trees in ground, but say, one side gets much more sun exposure than the other.  Over ten years, I'd think it would make a difference?  Maybe did it up after 5 years, and rotate the plant, then put back in the ground?   

Thanks John and T-Town Bonsai for "opening up my eyes" to trying in ground bonsai development! It'll be interesting to see how this pans out for me here in Chicago. 

Chris
Title: Re: Jim Gremel's shimpaku
Post by: gtuthill on January 17, 2012, 10:32 PM
Funny I was working on a tree last night that i have started using the method from the Lindsay Farr's World of Bonsai episode.  Not exactly what i was expecting so far but there doesn't seem to be a lot of info for producing curly trees this way.

I havn't had much luck with juniper cuttings, so i was thinking i might try wiring up some young shoots on some sacrifice foliage of a tree and then airlayer it off once it gets to a reasonable size. 

Anyone else tried this?
Title: Re: Jim Gremel's shimpaku
Post by: bwaynef on January 18, 2012, 08:44 AM
To bring this back to "Jim Gremel's Shimpaku", is the shari at the base of the trunk as low as its going?

(http://bonsaistudygroup.com/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=429.0;attach=13026;image) (http://bonsaistudygroup.com/shimpaku-juniper-discussion/jim-gremel%27s-shimpaku/?action=dlattach;attach=13025;image)
Title: Re: Jim Gremel's shimpaku
Post by: John Kirby on January 18, 2012, 07:52 PM
Wayne, we have talked about jinning a couple of the major rots that are high, as we tilt the tree farther back it will be required to continue a smooth transition in to the soil.
Title: Re: Jim Gremel's shimpaku
Post by: Judy on January 19, 2012, 01:50 PM
Great Tree, Great Thread all around.  Really like the idea jins on roots..
Title: Re: Jim Gremel's shimpaku
Post by: Chrisl on February 14, 2012, 11:09 AM
Japanese will not tell you everything unless you are students and work side by side with them.
John Kirby is correct.  wiring young whips of shimpaku cutting is the key. 
no wire = no bend = no curve = poor bonsai material


Sorry to bring this up again, but I bought some more Shimpaku seedlings/10 more that I'm going to plant in ground this spring.  I've been looking at a lot of finished Shimpaku's, and have wondered about the twisting nature of this tree's trunk growth.  Is this natural for the live veins/trunk to twist over time or does the twist also have to be wired...it's not exactly clear from Boon's note here, just bending and curving.  Which makes sense.  But I just don't know how these grow naturally, but many of the Jap. yamadori Shimpaku's have a very twisted trunk, so I'm guessing it's natural but just want to make sure I get it right from the get go.

Thanks!
Chris
Title: Re: Jim Gremel's shimpaku
Post by: jtucker on February 14, 2012, 09:37 PM
As is my understanding, from other threads on this board and speaking with club members, extreme twists and bends in actual yamadori come from several different factors such as environment (wind, rain, snow, ice, drought, fire, erosion, animals) and genetic mutation/predisposition to twisting.

Jim Gremel came down to San Diego to our club meeting and did a workshop with thumb-thickness shimpaku whips. The main thing we did in this workshop was to wire the whip from roots to tip very tightly with two parallel wires going up the trunk (after applying tight raffia). The further up the trunk, the thinner the wire we used. Instead of butting the parallel wires right next to each other, Jim had us put one wire halfway between the coils of the other, and then we bent the snot out of the whips to make "yamadori" style trees.

The theory is that, once these wired trees grow out for several years with the wire left on to bite into the bark, a dead vein will be choked off between the two wires, creating a ribbon-like shari. Jim told us to leave the wire on for 2 years. I up-potted my tree and it's been about two years since the work shop, and I haven't yet removed my wire. Therefore I can't tell you from actual practical experience what the results of this method are.

I'm not sure if the tree in this thread was created this way, or if this was a new experimental method that Jim was showing us. I do know that pretty much all of our trees looked totally stupid when we first tried to bend the snot out of them, and then Jim came by and tweaked them into looking halfway respectable, offering us ideas and help without making us feel belittled or dumb. The main difficulties most of the participants in the workshop all had in common were not wiring the tree correctly (the resulting shari might not happen or just look horrible) and bending the tree artistically and convincingly. This is where Jim Gremel is both a craftsman and an artistic genius.

Even if he never touched a tree in his life, he would still be a brilliantly intelligent person worthy of great admiration. On top of that, Jim's contribution to American Bonsai is such that I think all clubs around the USA should try and get him to present or do workshops if possible. I only wish I had been a little more advanced student a couple years ago when he came down to our club, so that I could really appreciate and absorb more from him.
Title: Re: Jim Gremel's shimpaku
Post by: Chrisl on February 15, 2012, 11:53 AM
Thanks jtucker!  That's a great story!  And very lucky of you to have an opportunity to have a workshop with Jim! 

Makes me a bit disheartened though to read this as I was hoping it was just natural growth.  Now knowing that there's a lot more to this, like you said, Jim's an artistic genius, which I am not lol  I'll approach my club to see if there's anything we can do to have him out here for one of our shows. 

Do you happen to have any photos of the work done in the workshop, or your tree as it looks now?  That'd be a great help jtucker if you do.

Thanks again for the note, I really appreciate it!
Chris
Title: Re: Jim Gremel's shimpaku
Post by: jtucker on February 15, 2012, 07:29 PM
I don't have any pictures, sorry. I'll try to grab some of the tree as it is now. It's actually raining here in San Diego, so I'll be busy running around screaming in panic ;-) for the next day or so. But after that I'll try and snap some pics.
Title: Re: Jim Gremel's shimpaku
Post by: John Kirby on February 15, 2012, 07:48 PM
Just wire and bend and twist the trees. Raffia down low, the second wire also helps to prevent trunk breakage by providing an additiona point of support on sharp bends. If you look at the Ebihara work (Kinbon May 2005) you see that he often used the large wire to hold and a smaller wire to prevent unsupported areas from breaking.
Title: Re: Jim Gremel's shimpaku
Post by: Chrisl on February 16, 2012, 11:47 AM
Thank You very much jtucker! 
Title: Re: Jim Gremel's shimpaku
Post by: jtucker on March 22, 2012, 12:27 AM
John, thanks for the extra rationale on the double wire (more support). One of those things Jim probably told us in the workshop and his demonstration that probably bounced right off of my thick skull a couple years ago!
Title: Re: Jim Gremel's shimpaku
Post by: tmmason10 on June 24, 2012, 06:58 PM
I really love this tree, and I'm using it as inspiration for a tree that I'm working on. Please continue to add updates, and thanks for sharing.
Title: Re: Jim Gremel's shimpaku
Post by: John Kirby on June 25, 2012, 12:27 PM
This tree was one of the Best In Show Trees at the ABS/BCI this pat weekend, was fun Jim Gremel was there to see it. Joh
Title: Re: Jim Gremel's shimpaku
Post by: Elliott on June 26, 2012, 12:51 PM
I was at Jim Gremels place a little while back when Ted Matson and I drove some trees up from so. Cal to no. Cal to be taken to the east coast for the national show in Rochester.
 Everybody should try and make a visit to Jim Gremels place. Everything is awesome (And I'm a picky bastard)!. All kinds of material from oaks he dug on his property to potentilla's that rival the ones you see in the kokufu books in the shohin displays.
 He has large and tiny trees in all stages of development. His blue atlas cedars are so dark blue, they look spray painted.
Oh, and don't get me started on the pots he makes.
 His material is very, very expensive (worth it), so I look at it like visiting a zoo-- just look and enjoy.
I hope that in the future, the USA will be full of artist's like Jim and Boon and my teacher, John Wang. We will then certainly be in the forefront of Bonsai.
Title: Re: Jim Gremel's shimpaku
Post by: Chrisl on June 26, 2012, 08:13 PM
Sounds like a fantastic opportunity Elliot!  Thanks so much for sharing your experience.  Sounds like it was a ton of fun ;)

Chris