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Author Topic: Import Cutting grown Itoigawa Shimpaku  (Read 3898 times)
John Kirby
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« on: September 10, 2012, 08:11 PM »

This is  a cutting  grown Itoigawa Shimpaku that I purchased from Dave Kreutz at the WBC convention in DC in 2005. This tre was originally imported as a field grown trunk by Joe Harris and Matsunami-en Bonsai at Isely's Nursery in Boring oregon. When Kreutz had it, Marco Invernizzi worked to establish the life lines and the deadwood. In 2006 Marco again worked o the dead wood and pruned it to stimulate back budding. In 2008 Mike Hagedorn did an initial stylng and branch selection. It got a bit weak, so I dewired and let it grow. I went through and did a base pruning and again cleaned out and define the live veins (three on the front). My goal is to wire next weekend, lime sulphur and spruce up.

Before work, after work (pruning and deadwood) and trunk close up.
« Last Edit: December 07, 2012, 01:39 PM by bsgAdmin » Logged

Adair M
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« Reply #1 on: September 10, 2012, 09:24 PM »

John,

The back stories about how you aquired these trees, and who has worked on them is as interesting as the tree itself!

I must say, you have great material!  Even if it is hard work to make it so!
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tmmason10
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« Reply #2 on: September 10, 2012, 10:09 PM »

Looks like a great trunk. I agree with Adair it must be nice to have a tree with a story.
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John Kirby
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« Reply #3 on: September 11, 2012, 06:54 AM »

I have a friend who tracks everything and everyone who ever does anything with her trees. She limits herself to a specific number of trees- buys one, sells one, etc. She can take trees back 20+ years. Something to be said for that. I think the key is to work on trees, getting those beautiful, well balanced trees takes work, multiple times over the years. Now some of mine take longer than they should, but that is just the way it is (live 700 miles away from your trees for 5 years...). Yes my wife is a Saint.
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Don Blackmond
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« Reply #4 on: December 07, 2012, 08:56 AM »

Nice tree.  Great potential.
I had several of those trees from Dave Kreutz.  I think he imported them for a workshop that never came to fruition.  Good material.
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bwaynef
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« Reply #5 on: December 07, 2012, 01:40 PM »

My goal is to wire next weekend, lime sulphur and spruce up.

You know the drill.  Pics or it didn't happen!
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marie1uk
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« Reply #6 on: December 30, 2012, 08:03 PM »

In 2006 Marco again worked o the dead wood and pruned it to stimulate back budding.

What's the best way to get junipers to produce back budding?
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JRob
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« Reply #7 on: April 04, 2013, 07:01 PM »

Good Evening John,

Since I own one of his brothers with the same history I was wondering if you have anything new to update us on this tree.

Thank,

JRob
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Don Dunn
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« Reply #8 on: April 06, 2013, 02:17 AM »

What's the best way to get junipers to produce back budding?
[/quote]

Good question, I was looking at a juniper I have that was neglected for a long time. It does not have much on the interior branches and I do not know what to do with it. I put it in a large plastic pot this spring to get it back healthy. I fertilized it and it did throw some back buds on the last four inches of the branches but nothing in close. 
Maybe cutting it back real hard would get more back budding.
I see bunjin style junipers and pines and I wonder if that's why they made a bunjin out of it.

  I need some suggestion on future styling of this tree.
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