Author Topic: Coiled Shimpaku  (Read 2864 times)

Vulcan

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Coiled Shimpaku
« on: April 18, 2012, 05:24 PM »
Just wanted to share a shimpaku that provided a nice opportunity to practice coiling. Mostly accomplished by using a stake as a base to bend around and then tied off with either ball twine or strips of cloth. Each following year the stake would be repositioned and the process moved a bit further up; trying to get a little more of a 3D effect.

I like the effect overall and now can focus on cleaning off the moss, work on the deadwood, work on the foliage, etc.

Here are some pics. of the front, right side and rear

[edit: offsite images removed]

Thanks for looking and comments are always welcome and appreciated.

John

« Last Edit: April 18, 2012, 07:45 PM by bsgAdmin »
 

Vulcan

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Re: Coiled Shimpaku
« Reply #1 on: April 18, 2012, 06:54 PM »
[edit: offsite image removed, again.]

here's the rear...
« Last Edit: April 18, 2012, 06:56 PM by bsgAdmin »
 

MatsuBonsai

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Re: Coiled Shimpaku
« Reply #2 on: April 18, 2012, 07:47 PM »
Very nice.

Grown in the ground, always in a pot, or a mix of both?
 

Vulcan

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Re: Coiled Shimpaku
« Reply #3 on: April 18, 2012, 09:09 PM »
It was started in a large terracotta pot, (4-5 gallons maybe), with a stake superglued to the base.
 

boon

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Re: Coiled Shimpaku
« Reply #4 on: April 19, 2012, 08:43 AM »
good start,  nice curve trunk.
 

Vulcan

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Re: Coiled Shimpaku
« Reply #5 on: April 19, 2012, 02:30 PM »
Thank you John and Boon for your encouragement. Hopefully, in about a year, this one will nice enough for a more permanent home than a terracotta pot. I thought of possibly a stone planting, but the more practical and artistically pleasing option may be a more non-traditional container. But, that can wait.

With Thanks

John
 

John S

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Re: Coiled Shimpaku
« Reply #6 on: April 21, 2012, 01:40 AM »
Vulcan, this tree looks great! How big is it overall? Also, can you be more specific about the technique you used and how big the tree was when you started? I'm really interested in trying this myself.
 

Vulcan

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Re: Coiled Shimpaku
« Reply #7 on: April 21, 2012, 10:48 AM »
Vulcan, this tree looks great! How big is it overall? Also, can you be more specific about the technique you used and how big the tree was when you started? I'm really interested in trying this myself.

Hi John, thanks for the compliment.

This tree is small. The trunk diameter is like a hair over an inch, the height is about 7 inches and almost 8 inches wide. The technique isn't hard in and of itself; it just takes time. When I got the seedling, it was no wider than a pencil (if that), so I didn't use any rafia. The time of year was important because I didn't want to try this when the sap was running, so I opted for late winter.

I didn't plant it in the ground, I just used a very large terracotta pot. I then took 2 dowels and set one at an angle like between 30-45 degrees...I don't think it really matters, and set the other perpendicular to the angled one where it met at a point and glued them both to the bottom.

I then took the seedling and wrapped it around the angled dowel and tied it off with a strip of cloth, and then brought it around and over the same dowel again and tied it off again. I left it like that for a year. The next was to use the perpendicular dowel as a tie-off point and do the same process for another year. It spent 3 years in that pot overall. In the meantime, I worked on the lower branches and after everything had set, I replanted it into a smaller terracotta pot and worked on the top.

What some of the guys do that are really good at this stuff, is as they wrap around, they'll scrunch it down and get that really fat, twisted trunk. I would imagine that it would take a lot longer and I think they would generally plant it in the ground; I've never tried that and really I was just looking for something more serpentine than fat.

Sorry I don't have pics. of the process, but I hope this sheds some light.

John
 

John S

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Re: Coiled Shimpaku
« Reply #8 on: April 21, 2012, 11:15 AM »
Yes, you explained it quite well thank you very much! Tell me though did you use the terra cotta pot because it gave you a deep bit of soil to anchor the dowels in, or because it helped add girth to the tree faster?
 

Vulcan

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Re: Coiled Shimpaku
« Reply #9 on: April 21, 2012, 12:21 PM »
Yes, you explained it quite well thank you very much! Tell me though did you use the terra cotta pot because it gave you a deep bit of soil to anchor the dowels in, or because it helped add girth to the tree faster?

Girth mostly. I wanted to give it as much room as possible, so I pretty much used the largest container I could find.