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Author Topic: advice on styling san jose juniper  (Read 2042 times)
oakman
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« on: May 05, 2012, 04:32 PM »

Good day everyone. I have had this san jose jumiper for several years and still cannot decide how to re-style it any advice would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks

Steve
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Jason E
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« Reply #1 on: May 05, 2012, 10:30 PM »

Hello and welcome,
The pictures are kind of hard to tell much from, looks like a possible candidate for a cascade style though.
 maybe use the left side and remove the long lower branch to the right. or visa versa.

Jason
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Owen Reich
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« Reply #2 on: May 06, 2012, 10:30 PM »

People involved in bonsai often call trees like this "confused".  The movement is not yet defined. I have been known to just cut one of the two conflicting trunks / branches off, and move on with the work  Smiley.  Like Jmex I would suggest an extreme angle change for a cascade style.  It has the right makings for one.  Be sure to consider the "weight" of the pads you keep in relation to the diameter of the trunk.  I'd cut back or off many branches.
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Adair M
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« Reply #3 on: May 07, 2012, 07:22 AM »

The tree looks like it was once pruned to look like a poodle dog, or pom poms.  I've seen these sold in landscape nurseries as "bonsai" treees.   I agree that some kind of cascade is your best choice.
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mlogan37
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« Reply #4 on: May 08, 2012, 08:10 AM »

I agree with Owen about the "confused" approach.  I would pose another question, maybe in ignorance, about the development of the tree.  In the pictures it appears to have the "pom pom" thing going on.  It looks like the foilage is emerging from the end of long straight or seemingly uniteresting branches.  I know we can do amazing things with wire, but it can become convoluted pretty quick.  Ok now on to the question.  Would it be wise to prune back the foilage in order to promote some budding further back on the trunks/ branches?  I ask this as this tree would appear, to me, to be a canidate for more time to develop.  Would more time in pushing the tree back create a better tree in the end?  I easily admit that my knowledge is limited but wonder if this might be the case with a peice of material like this. Please tell me I am wrong, because I have plenty of trees that I would love to style but have been sitting on my hands waiting for them to develop. 
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oakman
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« Reply #5 on: May 09, 2012, 11:33 AM »

I thank you all for advice, will post some more pics. i DO intend on getting rid of a couple branches. as for the pom pom style well i will be rectifyinng that . it is mid may here so not sure if the best time to get rid of any large branches (any suggestions?) i will be pruning back pom poms to bring it further back to trunk and bending branches to bring in to trunk as well.


havea great day.
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Jay
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« Reply #6 on: May 09, 2012, 01:16 PM »

Oakman, take a minute an go to the profile section and fill in some areas. Where are you? General discription is fine and your zone.

I'm in northern Vermont, working this tree now is just fine. So my advise might not be good to you if you are in say southern Texas.

Good luck with the tree and welcome aboard.
Jay
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Larry Gockley
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« Reply #7 on: May 09, 2012, 01:51 PM »

Hi oakman. Might I add, the first thing to consider when styling a tree is what is called the line. Simply the line of the trunk itself. It is hard to see the trunk from the pics. The best front could be a combination of the best line, ( trunk movement), and the widest or at least most interesting nebari. Avoid the trunk coming out of the ground perpendicular to the soil, and try to avoid branches parallel to the pot rim. When this is determined, remove secondary branches growing down, and inward towards the trunk. Go slowly, one step at a time. Just some advice on what to do. When to do this depends on where you live. Larry
« Last Edit: May 09, 2012, 02:00 PM by Larry Gockley » Logged

oakman
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« Reply #8 on: May 09, 2012, 04:06 PM »

here are some new pictures.
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Humunculus
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« Reply #9 on: May 10, 2012, 01:57 PM »

This will be very difficult to work with on account of the straightness of each of the primary branches on the tree.  I think your best bet is to prune back hard and hope something pops from the trunk directly.  It is in a big container and is hopefully vigorous (san jose is quite vigorous to begin with) so you might get lucky.  If you do get new growth off the trunk, feed the tree like heck to rebuild the foliage and eventually take off all of the currently existing big, straight primary branches.  Wire the new stuff after a year or so while it is still flexible enough to place wherever you want. 
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Humunculus
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« Reply #10 on: May 10, 2012, 01:59 PM »

And, just to clarify, when I say "prune back hard" I don't mean to cut off all of the existing foliage.  Leave a little green on each of the branches. 
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october
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« Reply #11 on: May 11, 2012, 03:59 PM »

Hello oakman... There is a bonsai in there..but it is going to be very hard on the tree to create it. You will need to be patient and work in steps, since the amount of work that might need to be done can/may compromise the tree's health. Sometimes it is better to just leave the tree were it was found. Not to say, that we do not ritually do heavy work on trees, but when there is this much to cut off. It is risky. Also, other things to consider are how much you paid for this tree and how attached to the tree are you.

Well, with all that being said. I think I have a direction for this tree. I believe a semi cascade would suit this tree nicely. Might be the only real possibility for it. Here is what I would follow if it were my tree. The first thing would be to tilt the tree towards the right, like in my virts. Tilting it towards the right and towars the ground will make it look like it is growing to the side and slightly down. Then, almost all of the branches to the left, have to be removed or jinned. This is where the health of the tree might be compromised. In which case, you could jin a couple of the branches, maybe cut off one of the other ones so it is not in the way. I would do this work in stages. Perhaps jin one branch and cut off one or 2 of the other ones this season. Then next season or the season after, you can reduce further. Also, repotting into good soil and on the new angle will need to be done at some point. However, everything cannot be done at once. If the tree does need to be repotted, you can do that first and make some minor cuts. If the soil is ok, then pruning will be the first priority.

These are virts showing the work that could be done to achieve a semi cascade. The blue is the image of the tree, the red would be cut off. The white parts would be jinned. As far as wiring, basically you are leaving 2 sections to work with, the apex or top and the main body of the tree. You can wire the branches out in both sections so they create small, seperate foliage/pads  like in my virt.

I hope this was helpful.

Rob
« Last Edit: May 11, 2012, 04:02 PM by october » Logged

Jason E
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« Reply #12 on: May 11, 2012, 11:33 PM »

nice virt Rob, sounds like a good plan.
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