Author Topic: Sad Year and Repotting  (Read 4318 times)

shimsuki

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Sad Year and Repotting
« on: February 14, 2010, 04:13 PM »
I just realized that this is going to be a sad satsuki year for me. Since I am repotting most of mine, I wont be able to let them flower.  :'(  :'(  :'(  :'( Ohh the sacrifices we make for healthy trees. Maybe I will be able to let one or two buds open on each tree for couple of hours.  ;D ;D

Some notes on how I repot satsukis:
I will repot most of my satsukis in the middle of march here in St. Louis. I do not let them flower the year I repot because flowering is the second biggest stress to a satsuki, the first being bare-rooting. Some people repot after they flower, but two big stresses to a tree is not healthy in my opinion. I use the chopstick method to repot satsukis because satsukis have great nebari and are very thin-skinned. Tying over there roots can harm them and leave wire marks on nebari. The chopstick method also holds them in better than any other method I have seen, and I am starting to use it on all my trees. I use kanuma here is St. Louis and it works the best (it also works great for cuttings). Satsukis need a deeper pot than other species because they flower. Flowering takes up an enormous amount of energy, and they need the extra leg room (aka roots) in order to be healthy. Since satsukis are feeder-root plants, I put yamagoki moss on top of the soil to keep the feeder roots moist. While working at a satsuki nursery over the summer I have seen the difference in the roots of the satsukis that have the moss and dont, and I am a firm believer in using it.

Shimsuki
« Last Edit: February 14, 2010, 04:15 PM by shimsuki »
 

John Kirby

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Re: Sad Year and Repotting
« Reply #1 on: February 14, 2010, 06:06 PM »
I see Dave K has passed on Goto-San's notes well.
 

shimsuki

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Re: Sad Year and Repotting
« Reply #2 on: February 14, 2010, 11:27 PM »
I see Dave K has passed on Goto-San's notes well.

You bet he has, the sad thing is I am only one of the few that he has passed them on to. There is not much interest for Satsuki in the STL bonsai club, but that doesn't stop me from liking them the most. On our satsuki weekends there are about 5-10 people that show up.

I still have much to learn, but I am lucky there is someone here who knows a ton about them and likes teaching me about them.
« Last Edit: February 14, 2010, 11:46 PM by shimsuki »
 

mcpesq817

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Re: Sad Year and Repotting
« Reply #3 on: February 16, 2010, 12:11 AM »
Dave K gave a good instructional session on satsukis at the Spring Show at the National Arboretum last May.  A lot of the same things you mentioned are tips he covered.
 

John Kirby

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Re: Sad Year and Repotting
« Reply #4 on: February 16, 2010, 06:02 AM »
Whoops, Gondo-san's notes. I got a copy of the "notes" from the multi year course that Gondo was taking students through out at El Dorado Bonsai in California from Vito Megna about 8 years ago. Listen well, Dave is an avid Satsuki grower and artist. You can learn a lot.
 

bwaynef

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Re: Sad Year and Repotting
« Reply #5 on: March 22, 2010, 01:37 PM »
Maybe I will be able to let one or two buds open on each tree for couple of hours.

Once the bud has burst into bloom, I was under the impression that no more energy was spent, so leaving the bloom on the tree for 1 hour or 1 week would be no different.
 

shimsuki

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Re: Sad Year and Repotting
« Reply #6 on: March 22, 2010, 10:08 PM »
Once the bud has burst into bloom, I was under the impression that no more energy was spent, so leaving the bloom on the tree for 1 hour or 1 week would be no different.

From what I have learned from Dave, the flower still takes up energy. Dave has told me that many people leave flowers on for too long, and that after a week or maybe two (stretching it) of enjoyment, the flowers should be removed. I dont know why, but I will ask him next time I see him.

Shim
« Last Edit: March 22, 2010, 10:21 PM by shimsuki »
 

bwaynef

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Re: Sad Year and Repotting
« Reply #7 on: March 23, 2010, 08:39 AM »
Fair enough.  I'll try to find something a little more substantial myself.
 

Dave Murphy

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Re: Sad Year and Repotting
« Reply #8 on: March 23, 2010, 04:58 PM »
I suspect forming seeds in the pistil of the flower start to consume energy after the flower has been open for several days...remove the flower and save the energy destined to be consumed by the seeds.

Dave
 

bwaynef

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Re: Sad Year and Repotting
« Reply #9 on: March 24, 2010, 08:37 AM »
I'll concede to that, but I wasn't in favor of leaving the bloom on 'til it went to seed.  As part of my concession though, I'll further concede that I didn't mention that beforehand.

I'll restate:  Once the flower has opened, the plant uses no more energy to maintain that flower.  Removing the flower before it goes to seed ensures no more energy is spent.

I didn't do my homework though, so I have nothing to cite.  Bare with me.
 

Dave Murphy

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Re: Sad Year and Repotting
« Reply #10 on: March 25, 2010, 07:33 AM »

I'll restate:  Once the flower has opened, the plant uses no more energy to maintain that flower.  Removing the flower before it goes to seed ensures no more energy is spent.


I agree, and I didn't do my homework either ;D.  I suppose the question is how long after the flower opens does it "go to seed".  The minutia here escapes me, and that is probably ok.  Remove the flowers after they've been open for a few days and that should be good enough.