Author Topic: Separated a pot-layered Twin-trunk Japanese Maple  (Read 11931 times)

0soyoung

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Re: Separated a pot-layered Twin-trunk Japanese Maple
« Reply #30 on: June 03, 2013, 12:31 AM »
I've had success with the wire girdle method on maples but it has not worked on a few conifers.  The iso alcohol idea is interesting and will certainly give it a shot.

Just for clarification, there is the wire turniquet applied to the tree in lieu of girdling the tree. Harry Harrington of Bonsai4me recommends this for some species. I've tried it on JBP. It does work, induces awesome basal flare, but takes at least one extra season. George Marakana, a grower in Nepemo, CA has tried it versus girdling and found this as well.

On the other hand, some people are of the opinion that a bridged girdle is because the top of the girdle growing downward. They espouse what Al has done, also wrap a wire around the top edge of the girdle to deflect the growth from the top of the girdle outward. This is what I am not convinced of and haven't really ever tried simply because the argument is not sensible to my experience. Obviously, I think residual cambium is the reason. The iso wipe down seems to do the trick.

BTW, I've attached a photo of a bald cypress girdle showing the growth of residual cambium after a few weeks - an instance of when I tried to scrape all the green away. The point is just to support my view of how bridging occurs, though I did subsequently cut this growth away, do the iso wipe, and had the layer root successfully. As I said previously, I've not had any of these troubles when doing the iso wipe as part of the original process.
 

Chrisl

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Re: Separated a pot-layered Twin-trunk Japanese Maple
« Reply #31 on: June 04, 2013, 10:38 AM »
I hope the girdling does work as I did a Pyracantha layer last mos., in a very large bush in the ground, and as best as I could, I removed as much cambium as possible, but getting to the back side was impossible.  So I cleaned by feel, and put a wire tournequit on with hopes it'll stimulate roots if indeed I didn't get all the the hardwood.  I too hadn't heard of alcohol, I'll give it a try on my next layer.
 

bwaynef

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Re: Separated a pot-layered Twin-trunk Japanese Maple
« Reply #32 on: February 28, 2014, 10:42 AM »
Finally in a pot.  I'm loving those roots!
 

bwaynef

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Re: Separated a pot-layered Twin-trunk Japanese Maple
« Reply #33 on: February 28, 2014, 10:44 AM »
(Ignore my mess.)
 

LarryAldrich

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Re: Separated a pot-layered Twin-trunk Japanese Maple
« Reply #34 on: March 01, 2014, 09:36 AM »
Thanks for the up-date.
 

SHIMA1

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Re: Separated a pot-layered Twin-trunk Japanese Maple
« Reply #35 on: November 03, 2014, 04:26 AM »
A couple of times throughout the year, I'd poke and prod at the ball of moss (surrounded by Boon Mix) that was hidden in the pot to see if there were roots.  Pretty early on I was sure that roots had struck, but I got busy this summer with other things and wasn't able to check regularly.

I expected I'd have enough roots to sustain the tree when I went to separate it this weekend.  Boy was I surprised!
This surgery is so satisfying isn't it?  I've done this with just pumice  mixed with milled sphagnum over a sheet of weed barrier then covered with a layer of moss. The barrier prevents the new roots from growing down into the soil surface. I was amazed how quickly the roots slithered through the pumice with good movement out to the edge of the pot.