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Author Topic: Best time to do major hack work on large japanese maple  (Read 1756 times)
Owen Reich
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« Reply #15 on: August 12, 2013, 01:32 AM »

Parts per million of what? I'm not sure why you think this is funny.  I am serious.  I thought this was hokey then I did actual research and fact-checking.  Prove me wrong.

There are a number of horticulture and agricultural research databases and many are free.  I used Agricola among others while at UGA.  John Kirby likely knows of a few others.
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Adair M
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« Reply #16 on: August 12, 2013, 05:51 AM »

Owen,

I feel you are probably right about the effects of the moon. Sometimes the "science" gets in the way.

Peter Tea was in town recently, and made an interesting comment on the difference of the way the Japanese approach Bonsai vs us Westerners:  He said the Japanese will do things "just because it works", and not try to figure out "why" it works.  He used as an example fertilizer. He said he was told to fertilize a tree with cottonseed meal. So Peter asked, what's its formula as in NPK?  The reply, "doesn't matter. It's cottonseed meal. It works."

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John Kirby
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« Reply #17 on: August 12, 2013, 06:04 AM »

Interesting Owen. Plants don't have a physical coordinating network, aka nervous system like higher animals, so the reception and transmission of information is accomplished  through an endorcine like mechanism. Look at how plants resond to injury, temperature variation ad change in day length. While I have never personally read anything about microgravational effects on plant growth and seasonal activation, it may be a factor. The impacts of changing light intensity and duration of light exposure in rural areas on seasonal changes also seems interesting. If there weren't so many factors involved, why do you think there is so much variability in the activation of growth among plants of a particular group across the rang of locations you find them in? And it all does not appear to be simply day length or temperature driven.

Adair, understanding why things work is why we live the way we do now, vs 200 years ago. However, I too think we over analyze things that do work. I frequently ask people who bring this up (fertilizer for example), have you exceeded the capacity of the fertilizer to give you the results you need? Frequently the fertilizer s the last thing we need to look at.

John
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Owen Reich
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« Reply #18 on: August 12, 2013, 01:33 PM »

John, I think you hit the nail on the head as there are so many factors involved in plant growth over a wide range of locations.  Microclimates are fascinating.   What I'm referring to involves the spin of the earth and moon (+ the sun).  I am not yet convinced about all the astrological influences on fruit size, vegetative growth, etc some biodynamic proponents claim but am not completely against the notion either. 

My teacher said the same about "it just works" too.  We should know why it works.  For example, cottonseed meal has a fairly high nitrogen content (around 6-2-2) and can have nice levels of trace elements depending on the source.  I attempted once or twice to explain why a product used to treat plants worked to my teacher and it did not go well.
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