Author Topic: Twin Trunk JBP -- Raw stock  (Read 8189 times)

bwaynef

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Twin Trunk JBP -- Raw stock
« on: November 26, 2012, 12:02 PM »
I found a very raw JBP this weekend that I thought had some possibilities.  I didn't take a before, but here's what I did with it.  There are a few branches that need to go, but I was primarily concerned with getting branches arranged so they could get pummeled with sunglight. 

Next steps?

Comments welcome. 
 

Markyscott

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Re: Twin Trunk JBP -- Raw stock
« Reply #1 on: November 26, 2012, 01:19 PM »
Nice pine.  One way twin trunk trees are commonly styled is with one trunk dominant (thicker trunk and taller) and the other subordinant.  The asymmetry is incorporated with the design in a number of ways - using the mass of the subordinant trunk as a replacement for the primary branch on the dominant can be one example.  It appears that you've laid out your design more symmetric in that both trunks are of very similar height and size.  Is your ultimate goal to preserve this symmetrical design, or do you want to move toward a more traditional asymmetric design in the long run?
 

Kajukid

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Re: Twin Trunk JBP -- Raw stock
« Reply #2 on: November 26, 2012, 02:30 PM »
Your tree is not strong,...it's too weak. Repot it in good soil and let it grow. Feed it a lot.
 

bwaynef

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Re: Twin Trunk JBP -- Raw stock
« Reply #3 on: December 04, 2012, 09:52 AM »
Your tree is not strong,...it's too weak. Repot it in good soil and let it grow. Feed it a lot.
Technically its not my tree.  I just wired it for a friend who has too many to keep up with.  I'll be returning it pretty soon, but will likely get the chance to repot it in the spring.  When I do, it'll be half-barerooted, and tied down in good (or at least better) bonsai soil.  I might poke a few holes in the other half and backfill them with bonsai soil just to add some aeration/drainage too.

Nice pine.  One way twin trunk trees are commonly styled is with one trunk dominant (thicker trunk and taller) and the other subordinant. ... Is your ultimate goal to preserve this symmetrical design, or do you want to move toward a more traditional asymmetric design in the long run?

I think its a little early to be choosing a final design on this tree.  As I mentioned in the opening post, there are a handful of branches that need to go still, but I wanted to balance vigor with quality growth so I opted to keep some branches that won't be part of any future design.  With the additional light and the stress of wiring most branches, I'm hoping to get some backbuddding.  I can probably get some fertilizer into this tree to help with that a little.

That said, I generally prefer asymmetry in most things, bonsai included.  It just depends on the tree's response and what will make the best tree in the end as to what I'll decide. (Assuming I get to be the one making these decisions.  This tree is for sale.)
« Last Edit: December 04, 2012, 09:56 AM by bwaynef »
 

John Kirby

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Re: Twin Trunk JBP -- Raw stock
« Reply #4 on: December 04, 2012, 10:05 AM »
I like it, we certainly don't see enough of the twin to multi-trunk conifers. Nice base and start. I would work on it!
 

Jason E

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Re: Twin Trunk JBP -- Raw stock
« Reply #5 on: December 04, 2012, 11:04 AM »
Quote
I might poke a few holes in the other half and backfill them with bonsai soil just to add some aeration/drainage too.


This topic was brought up at a recent lecture w/ a very well known bonsai pro.
He said never poke holes in the soil as this just compacts the soil further where you are poking. if you can't get water to permiate the soil you'd be better off building a dam around pot and let the water sit until it soaks in no matter how long that takes.

thought this was interesting as you hear of so many people using rebar or chopsticks to make holes trying to imrove aeration and drainage.
 

John Kirby

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Re: Twin Trunk JBP -- Raw stock
« Reply #6 on: December 04, 2012, 01:33 PM »
Interesting on the hole poking, have not done it myself but have heard people discuss it.

As with the JBP emergency repot thread, you bare root half of the tree, work the bottom, work the outside of, The remaining root mass and comb back the surface roots fom the nebari. This remove a large part of the trail oil and root mass and joule facilitate enhanced drainage.
 

bwaynef

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Re: Twin Trunk JBP -- Raw stock
« Reply #7 on: December 07, 2012, 09:38 AM »
I wonder if there'd be any benefit to doing this:

http://bonsaitonight.com/2011/08/09/brushing-branches/

Does anyone know if Jonas posted a follow-up to this post?
 

John Kirby

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Re: Twin Trunk JBP -- Raw stock
« Reply #8 on: December 07, 2012, 11:04 AM »
I think I will see him tomorrow or Sunday during workshops, ! will ask.
 

Jonas Dupuich

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Re: Twin Trunk JBP -- Raw stock
« Reply #9 on: December 08, 2012, 09:03 PM »
Good question - I only tried brushing the branches that one time and I don't know that anything extraordinary happened as a result.
 

bwaynef

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Re: Twin Trunk JBP -- Raw stock
« Reply #10 on: December 09, 2012, 09:01 AM »
Thanks for the feedback Jonas (and welcome aboard)!!  (Kirby, you're the best!)

Well ...that was inconclusive!  There was some interesting discussion in the comments of the link I posted.  If I can find a brush w/o too much trouble I might still give it a shot.  I'm not sure if I'll be able to tell any difference since I don't know much of the history of this tree or it's response.

 

MatsuBonsai

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Re: Twin Trunk JBP -- Raw stock
« Reply #11 on: December 09, 2012, 09:22 AM »
Perhaps a stiff tooth brush?
 

John Kirby

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Re: Twin Trunk JBP -- Raw stock
« Reply #12 on: December 09, 2012, 09:32 AM »
Wayne, since they are pretty close in size at the base, the smaller of the two trunks, on the left as face the first picture, should best be cut down to two branches at about the mid point, will reduce competition and give a little assymetry to the composition,
 

Don Blackmond

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Re: Twin Trunk JBP -- Raw stock
« Reply #13 on: December 09, 2012, 05:44 PM »
if your soil is compacted already, causing poor water permeation, then you are better off driving holes into the soil.  Use a chop stick or similar tool and don't penetrate all the way through the root ball.  This will create holes that will fill with water.  You can insure that water will get into the soil and be absorbed rather than rolling off the soil surface and down between the pot wall and outer root ball.  Or, you can do a root soak. 
 

Rkovo

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Re: Twin Trunk JBP -- Raw stock
« Reply #14 on: March 06, 2013, 03:15 AM »
As with the JBP emergency repot thread, you bare root half of the tree, work the bottom, work the outside of, The remaining root mass and comb back the surface roots fom the nebari. This remove a large part of the trail oil and root mass and joule facilitate enhanced drainage.

I have officially repotted the my emergency tree, but i give it maybe a 15% chance. It would mark my first serious tree loss.
I did exactly that with a lot of the original soil (which sucked hard) 50 %. some of the people from my club laughed at me when I brought it out to repot. They told me that it would be "good practice for repotting" some of the needles have turned back to slightly green. I hope i can see some progress for now it has moss covering the soil and i am giving it a light superthrive treatment each time i water. fingers crossed thanks for the tips everyone. i just wish i could figure how to post pictures on this site, still can't. it would be a lot more fun if i could.



p.s. love the material wayne even if its not yours i can see nothing but potential with that tree
« Last Edit: March 06, 2013, 03:18 AM by Rkovo »