Author Topic: Pinus thunbergii, var corticosa  (Read 10483 times)

John Kirby

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Re: Pinus thunbergii, var corticosa
« Reply #15 on: November 11, 2011, 07:10 AM »
Adair, when you see the tree in person, there is only one effective front with the current branches and trunk lean. You really don't get a sense of the size of this tree unless you have something to set the scale. Big tree.

Chrisi, this tree doesn't have the obvious graft at the base like most grafted nishiki in the US have. I am not really sure if this tree is a true "Nishiki" or just a really corky seedling. This is a really a very old bonsai (an old tree and one that has spent a very long time in a bonsai pot). The space between the wings of sections of bark could give one a sense of inverse taper, but that is really artifact. This is a marvelous tree that has great provenance with its connection to Mas Imazumi who was an important mentor and friend to Boon.

John
 

Chrisl

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Re: Pinus thunbergii, var corticosa
« Reply #16 on: November 11, 2011, 09:54 AM »
Thanks John for the explanation ;)
 

boon

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Re: Pinus thunbergii, var corticosa
« Reply #17 on: November 11, 2011, 10:26 AM »
John,  thank you for your help.

here is the pic from Intensive class last month.  it is not decandled this year.  it is very full and healthy.   it will be in our show on Jan 14-15, in Oakland at lake side park, lake Merritt.
 

JRob

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Re: Pinus thunbergii, var corticosa
« Reply #18 on: November 11, 2011, 11:33 AM »
Thank you Boon. I just love the bark this variety. I just bought a small one (10") being held for me that I will pick up in March. It is a shame I do not see more of them being used. They are so unique.

JRob
 

Chrisl

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Re: Pinus thunbergii, var corticosa
« Reply #19 on: November 11, 2011, 06:21 PM »
Boy, that is a big tree!  Perspective is so important ;)  Absolutely beautiful Boon!
 

boon

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Re: Pinus thunbergii, var corticosa
« Reply #20 on: November 12, 2011, 01:04 AM »
Thank you Boon. I just love the bark this variety. I just bought a small one (10") being held for me that I will pick up in March. It is a shame I do not see more of them being used. They are so unique.

JRob

that is nice.  pls post the pic after you get it.  cork bark pine is fragile.  it need special handling.  some of my students have them.
 i have seen quite a few around in CA in the past.  not too many now.  it will not last if it is not handle carefully.
 

boon

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Re: Pinus thunbergii, var corticosa
« Reply #21 on: November 12, 2011, 01:04 AM »
Boy, that is a big tree!  Perspective is so important ;)  Absolutely beautiful Boon!

Thanks,
 

JRob

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Re: Pinus thunbergii, var corticosa
« Reply #22 on: September 30, 2013, 08:57 PM »
Boon, Any chance of a current picture. I now have two - both imported. Hagedorn is helping me with them. I see him 3 times a year at the St. Louis Study Group. I'll post pics on this thread this weekend. Thanks & Regards, JRob.
 

RJNick

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Re: Pinus thunbergii, var corticosa
« Reply #23 on: October 01, 2013, 05:26 AM »
What a beautiful tree!
 

Herman

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Re: Pinus thunbergii, var corticosa
« Reply #24 on: October 05, 2013, 07:11 PM »
I've heard a lot of bad comments about cork bark black pine, one of them was " cork barks never make convincing bonsai and they are more of a novelty than anything else". Well, this tree makes a complete fool out of that person :D and I guess they dont know how and you do Boon.
that tree evokes more than one strong feeling within the viewer!  AWESOME TREE!!!

Herman
 

John Kirby

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Re: Pinus thunbergii, var corticosa
« Reply #25 on: October 06, 2013, 12:02 AM »
Herman, the biggest problem with most of the Cork Bark Japanese Black Pines is that they grafts and when the nebari are exposed, you have avery ugly reverse taper below the bark wings.  This tree is not a graft, so is probably just a uniquely corky japanese black pine. Being. 80+ years old doesn't hurt either.  There are some really nicegrafts out there that are grafted low enough for the corky wings to almost merge with the nebari, but they are not as common as the bad ones. My friend Jeff has one. The one thing that Boon does that most of us amateurs don't do is to work the candles about every other year (other than fall work) and he lives in an incredibly mild climate.
 

Anthony

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Re: Pinus thunbergii, var corticosa
« Reply #26 on: October 06, 2013, 08:43 PM »
John.

thanks for the information and that is an incredible tree!!!!!!!
I can only dream.
Incredibly mild climate - hmm?????
Good Day
Anthony
 

Adair M

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Re: Pinus thunbergii, var corticosa
« Reply #27 on: October 07, 2013, 01:23 PM »
Herman,

I may have been the person you are referring to who made the statement about the cork bark pines. If I said "never" I misspoke. They RARELY make good bonsai.

I am a student of Boon's and have seen that tree in person. Yes, it is a very nice tree.

Many of the cork bark trees shed their bark, and you find chunks lying on the bench. Then you have to glue it back on!

Boon has several trees that are lightly wired, just to hold the bark on so it won't get knocked off during watering or a rainstorm.

Boon also told me that cork bark pines really aren't very popular in Japan. They are grown just for their interesting bark. If they make well styled bonsai, all the better. They are too weak to candle prune every year, difficult to wire, and almost always have the reverse taper at the soil line.

I've had them in the past, I prefer to work on regular JBP that respond to bonsai techniques better.

Especially to someone new to JBP culture, better success will be achieved with regular JBP than with cork barked.
 

Herman

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Re: Pinus thunbergii, var corticosa
« Reply #28 on: October 08, 2013, 12:48 AM »
Then this tree is an exceptional exception haha

Hi adair, I was not actually referring to any one person, im sorry if it seemed that way. I heard the bad reputation of cork bark black pine from a lot of guys on the net. I really value the advice you and mr Kirby have given me this past year, and I would never try and flag or single out the people I respect...call me the idiot for speaking"typing" before thinking it through  ::) .
No hard feelings?

Herman
 

Leo in NE Illinois

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Re: Pinus thunbergii, var corticosa
« Reply #29 on: October 13, 2013, 01:48 AM »
I'm in the process of learning, and like others, I find the cork bark JBP to have a number of problems. In zone 5b, they are not as vigorous as regular JBP.

I definitely am not able to candle them every year. In some way, I end up working them more like my ponderosa, most of the styling work being done in fall. Selectively remove buds to balance energy when the growth was not vigorous.

Still learning. When, (if) I figure them out, I will write more. I have 5 different cultivars, and one from seed. It will be 10 or more years before I know if the seedling was luck enough to inherit the cork bark trait from its parent. Time will tell.