Author Topic: Pinus Banksiana as Bonsai  (Read 2543 times)

scottroxburgh

  • Full Forum Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 139
Pinus Banksiana as Bonsai
« on: December 07, 2011, 05:46 AM »
Why is this species not frequently used in bonsai in the US.

There is a gentleman in our club who has a number of them that he dug as seedlings around 15 years ago. They seem to get quite small needles and reasonable bark.

I found a picture of one of his trees, they seem to have potential?

What are your thoughts?
 

Treebeard55

  • Steve Moore
  • Full Forum Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 206
  • A.k.a. Steve Moore.
Re: Pinus Banksiana as Bonsai
« Reply #1 on: December 07, 2011, 08:33 AM »
Like you, I have rarely seen this species as bonsai. I've been told they are slow to bulk up, so work well only for bunjin; can anyone comment on that?

I have seen one: Helene Magruder showed her jack pine bunjin at the Mid-America Show in 2008. Won a ribbon.  :)
 

bwaynef

  • Administrator
  • Hero Forum Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1785
  • Thanked: 33 times
  • USDA Zone: 8a
Re: Pinus Banksiana as Bonsai
« Reply #2 on: December 07, 2011, 09:16 AM »
TB55, did the tree look that yellow in person or is that a white balance/lighting issue?
 

Treebeard55

  • Steve Moore
  • Full Forum Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 206
  • A.k.a. Steve Moore.
Re: Pinus Banksiana as Bonsai
« Reply #3 on: December 07, 2011, 03:31 PM »
TB55, did the tree look that yellow in person or is that a white balance/lighting issue?

It's the lighting, Wayne. It wasn't that yellow "in person."

On the same note, one thing I remember being impressed with was the obvious health of the tree. Helene was clearly taking good care of it!
 

amkhalid

  • Legit New User
  • *
  • Posts: 7
Re: Pinus Banksiana as Bonsai
« Reply #4 on: January 05, 2012, 10:16 PM »
Why is this species not frequently used in bonsai in the US.

There is a gentleman in our club who has a number of them that he dug as seedlings around 15 years ago. They seem to get quite small needles and reasonable bark.

I found a picture of one of his trees, they seem to have potential?

What are your thoughts?

Wow - cool to see that you are using Jack Pine in Australia!

They make outstanding bonsai... if you can find the right material. Like many most native species, they are only worth using if you can find high quality collected trees.

That being said, one guy from Toronto has collected basically all of the best Jack Pine in the bonsai world. Several of them are now dead (including the first one shown below), very few are show ready (the second one below is one of them), and a handful are hiding in people's backyards, slowly developing. Some of them are absolutely incredible twisty things. Some have thick trunks, but you are right that they are best suited to bunjin style trees. Thick trunk stunted jack pine are very, very rare.

They are a beautiful species with great bark, resilient deadwood, and short needles. Their drawback is that often the needles are twisted, giving them a "messy" look. They are also known to be quite tempermental with root work, especially after collecting.

They must be the best east coast pine. Pitch pine is the only contender... but neither species is well represented in the bonsai world, unfortunately.