Author Topic: Needle Therapy-by Chris Johnston  (Read 22021 times)

Dave Murphy

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Re: Needle Therapy-by Chris Johnston
« Reply #15 on: July 10, 2009, 08:18 AM »
Great read, Chris.  I'm a bit upset though...after years of study, I finally felt like I fully understood the energy balancing process via sequential candling of regions of different strength.  Today, I learn all that effort was unnecessary >:( ;).  Seriously, I'm a big fan of "keeping it simple", and have started experimenting on my own trees (a JRP and JBP) using this technique.  I have 2 questions for you.  I am remaking the apex on the JBP.  Does it make sense to utilize this technique on the lower, more complete areas of the tree to maintain the current shape of these areas while allowing the new apex to grow unchecked.  Also, because this technique is apparently less stressful to the tree, can you expect to use it on a yearly basis, or will doing so likely endanger the tree's long term health.  Thanks again,

Dave
 

bonsaikc

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Re: Needle Therapy-by Chris Johnston
« Reply #16 on: July 10, 2009, 09:09 AM »
Great read, Chris.  I'm a bit upset though...after years of study, I finally felt like I fully understood the energy balancing process via sequential candling of regions of different strength.  Today, I learn all that effort was unnecessary >:( ;).  Seriously, I'm a big fan of "keeping it simple", and have started experimenting on my own trees (a JRP and JBP) using this technique.  I have 2 questions for you.  I am remaking the apex on the JBP.  Does it make sense to utilize this technique on the lower, more complete areas of the tree to maintain the current shape of these areas while allowing the new apex to grow unchecked.  Also, because this technique is apparently less stressful to the tree, can you expect to use it on a yearly basis, or will doing so likely endanger the tree's long term health.  Thanks again,

Dave

Dave, welcome and thanks for the questions! Don't necessarily discard the ten-day system, it works just fine, but is a bit cumbersome if you have lots of trees. Also, don't think that this system is necessarily less stressful for the tree. Remember that we are cutting the tree back so of course it can only be done on extremely healthy trees.

As to different purposes on different parts of the same tree...in almost every tree not fully developed, you will find some parts that are ahead of the game and some that lag behind, so if you adjust your techniques in those areas, you will find what you need. For example, if you have one branch that is well ramified and close to where you want it, you might move into maintenance candling on that one, i.e., using the fall trimming to thin it a bit if needed. If the branch next to is is less developed and too short for the outline you want for the tree, you might cut half a candle instead of the entire candle to give length extension and therefore get budding along what you have left as well as some back budding.

For your apex, allowing this to grow unchecked changes the dymanic a good bit and you will have to be sure where you are going. In other words, pay close attention to the tree after each technique. We candle trees in development and get very good results.

This technique can be used on Japanese black pine, mikawa, and other two needled pines with the caveat that some species have a bit different growth habits. I was just speaking to Boon yesterday about kotobuki. It's closer in growth habit to yatsubusa, so many times you will be thinning the tree instead of candling. Since kotobuki and yatsubusa have shorter needles and denser growth, this technique every year can make them too thick and dense.

For nishiki, I do this every other year. Candling every year tends to retard the development of bark plating. I'm sure there are other caveats with other species, but I am not really qualified to speak to every one.

Chris
 

ken duncan

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Re: Needle Therapy-by Chris Johnston
« Reply #17 on: July 10, 2009, 10:51 AM »
Thank You for posting this Chris, great information.
Ken
 

mcpesq817

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Re: Needle Therapy-by Chris Johnston
« Reply #18 on: July 10, 2009, 11:32 AM »
Yes, thank you very much Chris for the tutorial.  Very helpful.  I think a lot of the confusion out there exists because of the lack of use of consistent terminology, but your tutorial clears that all up.
 

John Kirby

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Re: Needle Therapy-by Chris Johnston
« Reply #19 on: July 10, 2009, 05:12 PM »
One point, on show trees we still predominately use the ten day interval program. The trees that I have at Boon's that will be shown are handled like this- on Boon's insistence. Off years, or trees in development, or if you are working on someone's tree at a location where a follow up would be necessary.
 

bonsaikc

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Re: Needle Therapy-by Chris Johnston
« Reply #20 on: July 11, 2009, 02:28 PM »
Thanks for that clarification, John. Can you tell me the significance of doing that for show trees? Didn't we candle your red pine at one go that you showed the following January?

Chris
 

John Kirby

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Re: Needle Therapy-by Chris Johnston
« Reply #21 on: July 12, 2009, 09:01 AM »
We did cut all of the candles the same day, and I pulled needles a couple of weeks later. there were some "disparitiies" in needle length on the tree (small, but it was a small tree- chuhin). The last couple of years Boon has really emphasized the 10 day technique, I think there is some lack of uniformity in response when you leave the long stubs- we are talking very small differences on the big scale of things. On my tall twin trunk, I worked on that at your place last summer, I combined the two techniques- 14 days of  separation, the shorter tree is much stronger, and the stub and needle removal technique on the individual trunks. We will see. Boon even had me use the 10 day technique on my Shohin Black pine that will be shown again this coming year.

John
 

Mac In Oak Ridge

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Re: Needle Therapy-by Chris Johnston
« Reply #22 on: August 07, 2009, 10:58 PM »
Chris,
Thanks for making this available and for sending me here to look.

Mac McAtee
 

Leo de Leon

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Re: Needle Therapy-by Chris Johnston
« Reply #23 on: October 18, 2009, 05:22 AM »
Hi Chris,
I am from the Philippines and the climate we have here  is always on the warm side. After reading your very informative article, I have learned, I think,  how to decandle the JBP. The question is, we do not have four seasons over here. When you say spring, in your part of the world it is hot summer over here.  Your summer  starts in June and it is wet weather here until November. By the way we had severe rains and we experienced flooding in Manila and my Bonsai trees including the Japanese Black Pines were totally submerged under water almost 12 hours or more! Luckily, none of them died. In December the weather becomes cooler and nicer until February.

The question is, in what "season" do I work on my pines? When to prune or decandle and wire or repot? Before reading your article today, I worked on all my pines, decandling and wiring them. I cut off all the new growth. Hope I don't kill them by doing this.  They survived the big storm and I hope they survive my ignorance in pine. My pines are about three years old and they have been growing in their pots for such time.

Your advice will be appreciated greatly.

Regards,
Leo
 

bonsaikc

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Re: Needle Therapy-by Chris Johnston
« Reply #24 on: October 19, 2009, 02:26 PM »
Leo,
My advice is to check with someone in your part of the world. Our trees go into dormancy sometime in November with bitter cold during December through February. We can have warm days and very cold days alternating in March, with the possibility of freeze or snow into April some years. I can't say what is the best process for you.

Chris
 

Steven

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Re: Needle Therapy-by Chris Johnston
« Reply #25 on: October 19, 2009, 09:19 PM »
Ok, I got a needle therapy question. I have this JBP that has an airlayer on it(second attempt) but it is getting out of hand on needles bunchin up and not allowing any light into the interior. Today I thinned out the needles on the branches that are BELOW the airlayer but NOT any branches ABOVE the airlayer. The above is the most congested. Can I needle pluck these branches or should they be left to keep running wild with no budding on the interior( I know now they won't, season and all).
 

Leo de Leon

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Re: Needle Therapy-by Chris Johnston
« Reply #26 on: October 20, 2009, 08:34 PM »
Hi Chris,

Thanks for your reply.

There is no one whom I can ask about growing Japanese Black Pines as bonsai over here. Some bonsai artists here have tried and their pine bonsai is already dead. I just have to experiment by myself then. Thinking that I will make the rainy season as "spring time" and dormant season in January to February which is the coolest part of the year  as "dormant time".
 
Best regards,
Leo
 

bonsaikc

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Re: Needle Therapy-by Chris Johnston
« Reply #27 on: October 21, 2009, 01:15 PM »
Leo,
I would suggest you correspond with folk from Hawaii for help in your area. I don't know that Japanese black pine is especially suited to your climate. They do like a dormant season.

Chris
 

Leo de Leon

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Re: Needle Therapy-by Chris Johnston
« Reply #28 on: October 23, 2009, 07:35 AM »
Hi Chris,

Thanks once again.

I will follow your Needle Therapy except for the seasonal periods. I will treat the rainy season here as spring and the cool months of December to February as Autumn. I decandled my pines two days ago and  buds are coming out already.

I also don't know how long they are going to stay alive without dormancy, might as well enjoy them while they are with me.

Best regards,
Leo
 

holycow

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Re: Needle Therapy-by Chris Johnston
« Reply #29 on: October 24, 2009, 11:30 PM »
hi chris,

i'm aware (i think you said somewhere that is was possible) that you can use the decandling technique on pre-bonsai, however, is plucking only suitable for bonsai in the more advanced stages?  unforunately, don't have a pic to show how old the pre-bonsai is.  it's currently sitting in a double colander and it's only about an inch in diameter at the moment.  it  has nice movement and the original leader's still intact.  when the bonsaitalk forum was still active, i received some advice from vonsgardens about decandling prebonsai; however, given that the site is in hiatus i can't access the information....  so any advice would be greatly appreciated

regards,
ty
« Last Edit: October 24, 2009, 11:35 PM by holycow »