Author Topic: little JBP  (Read 2810 times)

GBHunter

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little JBP
« on: July 21, 2014, 11:02 PM »
These are my new JBP these were abot 4 foot tall sticks. So I cut them down and one of them bloomed out really well. The question I have is the candles on this tree are starting to point vertically,  should they be wired at this point? Or in this case shoul I leave the tree alone and let it recove from the large trunk cut?
 

Brian Van Fleet

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Re: little JBP
« Reply #1 on: July 22, 2014, 08:25 AM »
There's not much to wire at this point...and if you tried, you'd likely detach the new growth from the trunk.  Let them finish growing and harden off into the winter before any more work. 

Check out Brent's article here: http://www.evergreengardenworks.com/trunks.htm.  Although he states this article is more for d-trees than pines, it's a good read on trunk development.  You might consider repeating chops over several years as you've done here to develop taper and movement, rather than wire movement into a new leader.  It's more consistent with the straight lower section.
 

Leo in NE Illinois

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Re: little JBP
« Reply #2 on: July 22, 2014, 11:25 AM »
same website - Evergreen Garden Works has 2 excellent articles on growing Japanese Black Pines, well worth the read. Brent also has a number of other articles, he is a good "go to" for information about the early development phases of creating bonsai.
 

GBHunter

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Re: little JBP
« Reply #3 on: July 22, 2014, 08:48 PM »
I talked to Brent and bought some trees from him. He is a wonderful source of information.
Will this tree need to have to go through needle pulling? Also can shipakus be cut back?
« Last Edit: July 22, 2014, 08:50 PM by GBHunter »
 

Adair M

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Re: little JBP
« Reply #4 on: July 22, 2014, 09:09 PM »
Needle pulling is a refinement technique to "balance" the tree's energy. If you are in the "growing out" stage, you don't need to be pulling needles. You want all the energy you cab get to build trunk.
 

Sorce

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Re: little JBP
« Reply #5 on: July 23, 2014, 05:53 AM »
Gb. You are definitely seeing the tree inside better!

Nice starts.

Sorce
 

GBHunter

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Re: little JBP
« Reply #6 on: July 23, 2014, 10:46 AM »
Really? !
I guess this is something that just happens slowly. Cant really speed it up.

Thanks
 

GBHunter

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Re: little JBP
« Reply #7 on: July 23, 2014, 11:03 AM »
 

Adair M

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Re: little JBP
« Reply #8 on: July 23, 2014, 11:14 PM »
GB, your linked article has good information for refining JBP.  Your trees are not at that stage of development.  You need to let them grow and get stronger.  Build some trunk.  Refining is the process by which we develop ramification (dense branching) and short needles.  Look at the trunk of the "plucked chicken" in that article, and compare it to yours.  You need to develop trunk.

Do not consider decandling nor needle pulling at this stage of the game on those trees.
 

Herman

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Re: little JBP
« Reply #9 on: July 24, 2014, 02:36 AM »
Feed it water it and wait till the trunk has increased a lot, then chop back again. Just like BVF and Adair advised you to do


kind regards
Herman
 

Sorce

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Re: little JBP
« Reply #10 on: July 24, 2014, 04:10 AM »
The only thing we can speed up, is an invasion of pests.

But if we can slow this down, we can speed up our development.



That and the perfect soil mix! ;)