Author Topic: JBP: The Paradox  (Read 5003 times)

Adair M

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Re: JBP: The Paradox
« Reply #15 on: March 31, 2013, 08:37 AM »
When I was at Boon's, we didn't add any innoculant to the soil when we repotted.  It grows well in Boon's Mix.  As I understand it, it thrives when the pot is allowed to dry out a bit between watering.  If the soil is kept consantly wet, it doesn't grow as much.  Also, an open mix structure appears to be helpful.  (I am not the expert on this.  I am reporting on what i've seen with my own eyes.  Boon uses a very open mix.  The trees were loaded with mycorhyza.  More so than I had ever seen.  I've only been using Boon Mix for my trees for about a year, so I haven't repotted those yet.  Trees that I've purchased that were originally sourced from Brussel's had some mychorhyza, but nothing like Boon's trees.  Brussel's soil is much, much heavier with organics.

 

Herman

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Re: JBP: The Paradox
« Reply #16 on: April 01, 2013, 07:43 PM »
Herman,

JBP benefit from a fungus in the soil: mychorrhiza.  It is a white fungus, and it forms a symbiotic relationship with the roots as it helps the tree absorb nutrients.  Note, however, it does not grow well in continuously moist soils.  It needs to dry out to grow.

When I was at Boon's repotting trees (in all organic soil) the root balls were almost solid with the stuff. 

It is so beneficial that some even add mychorrhiza to their soil mix.  But that's necessary.  It occurs naturally, as the spores are in the air.  If the conditions are right, it will appear.  (Another reason to use an all inorganic mix.  It dries out better for the mychorrhiza.)

Now, given all that, I would think that anything you put in the soil to kill fungus would prevent the mychorrhiza from growing, and I'd rather have the mychorrhiza.

Also, always take what the "forrestry guys" say about growing trees with a grain of salt.  They don't think about growing in pots, they grow for maximum lumber and height.

I know what mycorhyza is and how it functions, your concern that a systemic will kill the good fungus and not only the bad one was a potential issue...thanx again to mr Kirby for addressing this issue and clarifying it for us...

Turns out the forestry guy had some sound advice ;)

Herman
 

bwaynef

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Re: JBP: The Paradox
« Reply #17 on: April 02, 2013, 09:43 PM »
Just so somebody can tell me I'm doing something wrong:

This tree is in the greenhouse.  When temps were possible to dip below freezing, I made sure to heat it to keep it at or above.  I am trying to allow it to dry out between waterings.  I've also added 4 teabags of Jobes Organic 5-4-4.  I've got some new sphagnum moss to add to the soil, but haven't had the opportunity to place it on the soil surface.

Nothing to justify a new picture, but the buds are starting to move all throughout the tree.
 

Adair M

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Re: JBP: The Paradox
« Reply #18 on: April 03, 2013, 05:14 AM »
Wayne,

I ran into Owen Reich at Plant City Bonsai the other day, and on discussing JBP, he mentioned that it can help buds if you must them. So, I don't think you are doing anything wrong, but that's something else you can do.
 

Gaffer

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Re: JBP: The Paradox
« Reply #19 on: August 11, 2013, 06:06 PM »
If you are going to Pull all your needles you better spend the year before you do it fertilizing you tree before you do it. If the tree is not really healthy it will probably die.