Author Topic: JBP Healthy enough to start work?  (Read 2181 times)

bretts

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JBP Healthy enough to start work?
« on: March 22, 2010, 10:41 AM »
I got this JBP in a group deal a couple of years ago. It was in a declined state and when I got it home I realised why. (Pic#1)
The owner had purchased the tree from Ray Nesci and then with no work plonked the root ball into a bigger pot with potting mix(to lengthen the roots for root over rock  ). It was drowning. From memory this was around summer so I scrapped the soil away as best I could back to the original root ball and soil of Ray nesci. Then put it into a smaller terracotta pot. You can see that it had lost some branches and I was expecting to lose some more but it slowly recovered.
This spring(6 months ago) I did a 1/3 or maybe it was closer to 1/2  soil change with akadama, crushed terracotta mix.
(Pics#2&3)
I haven't grown much JBP so at first I thought the tree was going bonkers with a heap of buds but they ended up being male cones I think which was a little disappointing.
Not sure if I should have rubbed them off to conserve energy?
The tree has continued to grow well but I am not sure if it is ready to be worked on?
It is on it's second growth of the year while other JBP are on their third. The strongest growth has 4 buds and the weakest have one bud. Couple with 4 buds, couple with 3 buds, few with 2 buds and a few with one bud. Some needles seem to droop a bit but they are very long so this tells me the growth is strong. I put my healthiest JBP next to it and I am surprised to see there is no colour difference. Maybe the tree is ready for some work?
(Last pic)
« Last Edit: March 22, 2010, 10:45 AM by bretts »
 

bretts

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Re: JBP Healthy enough to start work?
« Reply #1 on: March 22, 2010, 10:42 AM »
More pics
 

bretts

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Re: JBP Healthy enough to start work?
« Reply #2 on: March 22, 2010, 10:44 AM »
There are a couple of branches that have not revoverd from dead buds but have budded out further back on the branch.
(Pics 1,2,&3)
The way the bark is separating makes me think there is good growth in the trunk also!
I have considerd a Literati but I guess it could be more of an informal upright as well. I am sure there is a tree in their but after looking at it for a couple of years I am still not sure.
Once I start work removing dead and weak branches maybe something will come to me. Might make a good workshop tree.
Any ideas on styling and or where to start with horticultural technique from here would be appreciated.  I was thinking I could work the top now(when time is right   Undecided) giving the roots a rest and repot the other half of the root ball in two years?(Pic4)
 

cbobgo

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Re: JBP Healthy enough to start work?
« Reply #3 on: March 22, 2010, 03:53 PM »
It sure looks healthy to me.  I would say you should start with removing the needles that are 2-3 years old, so that you can see more of the structure, and get some light into the interior.

In  the Norther Hemisphere we de-candle in July which is mid summer.  What's the usual routine down under?

- bob
 

bretts

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Re: JBP Healthy enough to start work?
« Reply #4 on: March 23, 2010, 01:13 AM »
Thanks Bob. It is about December here to remove candles. Are you sugesting I should remove some needles now or just wait to start summer training? We have a pretty long growing period here.
 

John Kirby

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Re: JBP Healthy enough to start work?
« Reply #5 on: March 23, 2010, 10:03 AM »
Brett,
I think Bob is referring to the fall removal of old needles and buds in excess of two at branch ends and then fall pruning. So, April may be a good time to start work if your trees have started to slow down- go "dormant" if not you can wait until May-

Typically, on a tree like this, just getting restarted in bud and growth control, you would remove all old needles that have been on the tree for 2-3 years prior to this year. They are usually the long interior needles. If you are concerned about additional budding on the inside, you can use scissors (this one time....) to cut the interior needles to 5-10 mm or so, they will then die and dry up, fall ing off and leaving the interior buds. I pull mine with tweezers, but this time you can cut. Doing this work opens the tree up for sunlight to penetrate and activate dormant (adventitious) buds, and should allow you to make a much more compact tree in the near future. Next summer you can start with candle reduction on the branch ends to continue to force interior buds and to begin branch development.

The next time you repot you can start cutting off the roots that wrap around the trunk, then you can see what kind of nebari can be salvaged over time- might be an easy fix, hard to see until the roots are removed.


Nice save,
John
« Last Edit: March 23, 2010, 10:05 AM by John Kirby »
 

bretts

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Re: JBP Healthy enough to start work?
« Reply #6 on: March 23, 2010, 07:31 PM »
Thanks John that sounds like a very good plan  ;D I had heard about cutting compared to pulling the needles. I will cut this time and try and learn more about this for the future.