Author Topic: Japanese Red Pine buds  (Read 9196 times)

bwaynef

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Japanese Red Pine buds
« on: September 18, 2015, 09:39 AM »
Can someone show me examples of healthy growth/buds on Japanese Red Pine at this time of year? 

I've (half-bare-root) repotted a tree that was in poor soil (under Boon's supervision) and I'm fertilizing heavily and recently moved all my trees to the absolute sunniest spot I have available.  I'm trying to get this tree as healthy as possible.  I understand what to look for with JBP, but JRP is a new beast.

Can anyone help me out?

Thanks
 

bwaynef

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Re: Japanese Red Pine buds
« Reply #1 on: September 18, 2015, 09:57 AM »
I imagine there's a good bit of carry over from this article:
http://bonsaitonight.com/2015/09/04/good-buds-bad-buds/
 

Dirk

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Re: Japanese Red Pine buds
« Reply #2 on: September 19, 2015, 12:50 PM »
Some pics of one of my red pines.
Buds on red pine are red (ish) pointy and a little fluffy.

I hope this helps.

Dirk
 

bwaynef

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Re: Japanese Red Pine buds
« Reply #3 on: October 09, 2015, 01:09 PM »
Here's a few from mine:
1. bottom
2. lower-middle
3. top
4. bottom-est.
 

Dirk

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Re: Japanese Red Pine buds
« Reply #4 on: October 10, 2015, 12:00 PM »
Today I reduced buds on about 8 Pinus Sylvestris. The buds on your tree look very much li kk e the  buds on P. Sykvestris! The don't look like Red Pine buds to me. They don't look like Black Pine buds either.

If you are sure your tree is Red Pine, (P. Densiflora) I don't think the buds look healthy.
 

Brian Van Fleet

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Re: Japanese Red Pine buds
« Reply #5 on: October 11, 2015, 07:20 AM »
Yours doesn't look very happy.  Maybe with better soil and siting, next year will be better.
Here is a JRP from seed, taken a couple weeks ago.
 

Josh

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Re: Japanese Red Pine buds
« Reply #6 on: October 11, 2015, 04:52 PM »
This is a moderately healthy 25 yo JRP, pictures taken today. Wire removed and candle cut this summer.  If not candle cut, needles would be 4" long, rather than <2" now. Tree could likely use a bit less water and more sun light. Interior of new needles are a bit light.
 

Josh

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Re: Japanese Red Pine buds
« Reply #7 on: October 11, 2015, 04:54 PM »
Sorry, not so good with iPhone posting. Picture rotated, don't know how to fix that.  Maybe I need to take sideways. Anyways, here is the pic of the buds.
 

Josh

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Re: Japanese Red Pine buds
« Reply #8 on: October 11, 2015, 05:12 PM »
I find JRP challenging, but understandable (if you are familiar with JBP) and rewarding. 

Initially, you need to get them healthy.  Good soil, light, and fertilizer.  When healthy, they tend to look like a mop with long needles, which can droop.  You can cut them in winter, if you can't stand it, like I do. 

Once healthy, you can candle cut in summer.  Usually 2 weeks later than JBP.  They respond well to candle cutting, and will back bud more than JBP and produce shorter, and more balanced needles.  Now they are ready to fine wire, and thinning out needles in winter for balance. 

Next spring, some candles may be very long (> 4").  I break these in half, which stops growth.  In late June I will candle cut all but the very weakest candles.  In 2-4 weeks, new candles form, which tend to be more balanced.  After 4 years of this treatment, you have the result in my earlier pictures. 

JRP, as with JBP are a year round project.  Get them strong, first.  Needle thinning, and candle cutting next and in several year cycles you will get a nice result.
 

bwaynef

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Re: Japanese Red Pine buds
« Reply #9 on: December 09, 2015, 01:27 PM »
Any discernible progress?
 

bwaynef

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Re: Japanese Red Pine buds
« Reply #10 on: December 09, 2015, 01:28 PM »
A few more
 

MatsuBonsai

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Re: Japanese Red Pine buds
« Reply #11 on: December 09, 2015, 03:01 PM »
Yup, those are buds. As much light as you can give this winter and fertilize the crap out of it come spring.
 

bwaynef

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Re: Japanese Red Pine buds
« Reply #12 on: December 09, 2015, 03:03 PM »
Think it ought to be repotted in the spring, or leave it be for another year?  (It was half-barerooted this spring w/ Boon at a workshop at the Bonsai Learning Center.)
 

MatsuBonsai

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Re: Japanese Red Pine buds
« Reply #13 on: December 09, 2015, 03:09 PM »
Leave it another year. Half bare root, then the other half at next repotting, typically 2 years.
 

Adair M

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Re: Japanese Red Pine buds
« Reply #14 on: December 09, 2015, 03:24 PM »
Wayne, the color is good. The buds look ok to me.

I take it you didn't decandle last summer?

Let me think... You repotted last year in March, right?  Were the buds moving when you repotted?  If so, that may be why they're a little lethargic. But remember, red pine is not as vigorousyive appriach as black.

Getting the tree is in good soil is important. You want to do that as soon as you can without "rushing" it.

The conservative approach would be to wait a year. If you get strong spring candles, consider decandling in early July. I use July 4th as my tatget date. (I know you'll be too busy making BBQ that day, but that's my day.)

Then do the other 1/2 bare root repot the following year.