Author Topic: Japanese black pines in the tropics  (Read 3902 times)

Anthony

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Japanese black pines in the tropics
« on: November 04, 2012, 08:08 AM »
Morning Folks,

here are my latest efforts, since last you saw them.
Feel free to comment, negative or positive.

Please note I am growing these in a tropical climate with a reported low of 15 deg. C. [ 60 deg.F ] as the lowest ever, normally we go to 19 deg.C [ 70 deg.F ]
I suspect that Japanees Black Pines, may have also started off as Chinese Black Pines and somewhere in South China, since it is obvious that they do not need to go dormant by cold, but probably by light. I quote the Serissa from China, for the sceptics. My friend Carl, winters them outdoors in New Jersey. So much for indoors and tropical.
As well as the Chinese elm, it rests for about a month, and then continues on.  My oldest black pine is now 25 years and the Elms are almost 30.
Later.
Anthony.

29/May/ 2012 and the second is 4/November/2012 - I read Owen's comments in another topic and thought I should do something. So I cut some needles and plucked some and wired down. Wow lots of choices, in buds. Needles are also reducing :o
Should I thin out the needles more and where ?
 

Anthony

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Re: Japanese black pines in the tropics
« Reply #1 on: November 04, 2012, 08:58 AM »
Another one
 

Anthony

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Re: Japanese black pines in the tropics
« Reply #2 on: November 04, 2012, 08:59 AM »
Last one
 

John Kirby

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Re: Japanese black pines in the tropics
« Reply #3 on: November 04, 2012, 09:16 AM »
OK? JBP have been raised in South Florida, Hawaii, lots of "tropical" places (Puerto Rico?). Yours look nice and healthy. the question comes as to when you want to reduce needle length (the shorter needles you have now will continue to lengthen until the next candle/bud flush). I have no doubts that you can grow them, the question will be how do you manage them, if you are content with 2-4" needles on a healthy 6-8" tall tree that will be easy.
 

Anthony

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Re: Japanese black pines in the tropics
« Reply #4 on: November 04, 2012, 10:19 AM »
John,

with the exception of Puerto Rico, all of those other places are Sub-Tropical and probably satisfy the conditions for Black pine growing. Tropical means no frost and no chance of temperatures below 55 deg.F or so as far as I remember.
[ I stand to be corrected, going on memory here.]

Before I forget, thank you very much for taking the time to respond.

I know Mr. L.De Leon also has Black pines and I have recently checked with him on his trees. Doing Well.

Small needles, should I aim for 1" ?

From experience down here, trees kept very healthy, respond very well to defoliation and actually bud heavily, to the point where I have to take a bamboo skewer and knock off extra buds, as they grow past the match head size. This is especailly noticeable with the Tamarind.
Additionally more buds, leads to smaller leaves, especially as the tree ages, perhaps this will work on the Black pine?

Seeing how many buds are on those pine branches [ once I got past the cowardice to not cut or pull needles and actually try to thin back to 6 or so needles ---------------- which is why I asked if you guys felt I should thin the first tree more heavily ?]
I will continue to apply full sun 6 to 6, fertilize more, and if need be cut the candles.

As I mentioned about a year ago, I am having to combine what is said of Japanese grown Black pines, and what I observe down here.
This is why I took the time to grow enough victims to test on.

Bill on the Chatline also suggested I keep them in pots at a max depth of 6" [ 15 cm ] and I try to use earthenware pots that can wick away extra water, in heavy rains.

I also have to invest in a pair of stainless steel tweezers.

Anyhow, once again thanks for replying.
Later.
Anthony

 

Anthony

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Re: Japanese black pines in the tropics
« Reply #5 on: November 04, 2012, 02:00 PM »
Hey John,

you may have given me the answer I was looking for. These branches are loaded with tiny candles, what if all I had to do was chose the correct ones for development and see if they would produce the 1'  needles ?

Will note, and develop tests. Show the results next year this time.
Later.
Anthony
 

John Kirby

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Re: Japanese black pines in the tropics
« Reply #6 on: November 04, 2012, 04:53 PM »
Wll, then, if the eastern edge of Hawaii and the island of OAhu aren't tropical, I can't help you. Best of luck.
 

Anthony

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Re: Japanese black pines in the tropics
« Reply #7 on: November 19, 2012, 07:32 AM »
John,

the answer I was searching for, I found today. Though the candles do not extend at the time expected for those in Japan, I found when I got brave enough to take out needles, a ton of fine candles about this long __ and so I bought a tweezer and a very small scissors.
I started to remove the candles I didn't need.

See you next year and hopefully I will have needles closer to 1" [ 2.5 cm ] to show you.
Thanks a million.
Later.
Anthony [ Guan Wen Lo[h] as my dad liked to call me, eh Leo ]
 

Leo de Leon

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Re: Japanese black pines in the tropics
« Reply #8 on: January 07, 2013, 10:22 AM »
Hello Anthony, good to know that your JBPs are doing well.
Warmest regards,
Leo