Author Topic: Chuhin Japanese Red Pine  (Read 12379 times)

John Kirby

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Chuhin Japanese Red Pine
« on: December 14, 2009, 06:37 PM »
This Japanese Red Pine is abut 14" tall and was shown in the BIB show in 2009. It is a tree that can be shown from multiple fronts, and as a yamadori has some interesting properties. The reason I a posting here is to again show how proper candle and needle management can really improve a tree very rapidly. This tree had a great disparity in foliage density between the top and the lower branches last year, there were also a number of places where we had to cut needles to make the tree look right to show. This year, the third using a very focused approach to decandling and needle pulling, we have finally gotten the top and bottom to be "right". I now wish I hadn't pushed to get this tree in the show last year, next year if all goes well it should even be better.

Pictures show selected front (with shari) and other front after work.

John
 

bwaynef

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Re: Chuhin Japanese Red Pine
« Reply #1 on: December 14, 2009, 07:25 PM »
Excellent work.  I like that the 2nd front hides the trunk a little (lot) more in the apex ...while still showing tons of movement in the trunk. 

Excellent needle/balance work ...but you knew that.

Have any pictures of this one before it was show-ready?
 

John Kirby

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Re: Chuhin Japanese Red Pine
« Reply #2 on: December 14, 2009, 07:45 PM »
Not on his computer, will have to go looking, here it is last December as it was getting repotted (it is shown in its old pot) and ready for the show. I prefer the front with the deadwood showing, it is quite unique in person.
John
 

Don Blackmond

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Re: Chuhin Japanese Red Pine
« Reply #3 on: December 14, 2009, 09:49 PM »
this is one of my favorites out of the trees I've seen you post here and on the other sites.  this tree has lots of character, lots of pazazz.  Its very nice John.
 

BONSAI_OUTLAW

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Re: Chuhin Japanese Red Pine
« Reply #4 on: December 15, 2009, 01:15 AM »
This is also one of my fav trees of yours John.
 

MatsuBonsai

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Re: Chuhin Japanese Red Pine
« Reply #5 on: December 15, 2009, 03:36 PM »
I still like the other front better.  Great work.  Great tree.
 

ChrisM

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Re: Chuhin Japanese Red Pine
« Reply #6 on: December 15, 2009, 05:08 PM »
i don't know guys, i prefer the choosen front, by the books, it works better. in the second pic (of the current back) the first large "elbow" in the trunk curves and comes right at you, big no no. then as you progress up the tree, the apex is very closed off and unwelcoming to the viewer. while with the choosen front there nothing "poking my eye out" at the bottom of the tree and the apex is open and welcoming. just my two cents. great tree!
 

MatsuBonsai

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Re: Chuhin Japanese Red Pine
« Reply #7 on: December 16, 2009, 04:39 PM »
John,

Do you have any side pictures of this one to share?
 

JRob

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Re: Chuhin Japanese Red Pine
« Reply #8 on: December 16, 2009, 07:05 PM »
John,

If I am correct this tree is the same one as on pages 53 & 83 of Bay Island Bonsai - An Exhibit of Fine Bonsai 2009. The book is fantastic. I received my copy 3 weeks ago and was very pleased.

JRob
 

John Kirby

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Re: Chuhin Japanese Red Pine
« Reply #9 on: December 16, 2009, 07:39 PM »
JRob,
Yes it is.
Matsu, no side pictures. Al Keppler essentially did a 360 view of this tree from the show last winter (he posted all of the pics on BT). The tree has lots of movement, visible from all sides.

John
 

MatsuBonsai

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Re: Chuhin Japanese Red Pine
« Reply #10 on: December 16, 2009, 07:50 PM »
I've got some pics of front and other front, but no sides.  I really like the exaggerated movement in this tree.  If I remember correctly the side shape is partially (I think) why I prefer the other front.  That, and I seem to remember it was wired for the other front.
 

John Kirby

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Re: Chuhin Japanese Red Pine
« Reply #11 on: December 16, 2009, 08:34 PM »
It was wired initially for the other front, and then slightly repositioned for this front.
 

Marc

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Re: Chuhin Japanese Red Pine
« Reply #12 on: December 19, 2009, 12:04 PM »
Yes! Yes! oh yeah!!! Wonderful movement,  this tree will continue to get better with refinement which is hard to believe because it looks so good now. A very special tree!

Marc
 

scottroxburgh

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Re: Chuhin Japanese Red Pine
« Reply #13 on: December 24, 2009, 02:16 AM »
Hi John,

Do you treat this JRP the same as JBP? I have heard that they can be treated the same, but not worked as hard (every second year off work?).

I have Boon's DVD's on JBP repotting and decandling and would like to know if i can treat them as in these DVD's, with the candle trimming?

Thanks.

Scott
 

John Kirby

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Re: Chuhin Japanese Red Pine
« Reply #14 on: December 24, 2009, 08:26 AM »
Scott,
This tree is treated exactly like a JBP, with the exception that we leave a few more needles on each tip when candles are removed. This tree lives with Boon in Alameda California, cool summers and mild winters. The JRP's I have in Arkansas are treated just like JBP, but I have tended to decandled them earlier in the season than the JBP- June for me (December for you). I might suggest that you take pictures of it each year after decandling to compare the candle growth year to year- fertilize well in the fall and spring lead up to decandling and you should be able to decendle annually- if it slows down and doesn't get effective candle growth in any year, skip decandling and remove the old needles only and resume the next year.

Use a good soil mix they will get great root growth.

Good luck,
John
« Last Edit: December 24, 2009, 08:34 AM by John Kirby »