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Author Topic: boon repot  (Read 1246 times)
Jay tupelo
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« on: November 30, 2012, 07:46 PM »

in the boon repot video after he cleans the bottom roots and works to the top roots and combs them is that considered bare rooting them please help ?  i guess i need clarfication on bare root?
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cbobgo
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« Reply #1 on: November 30, 2012, 10:36 PM »

i have not seen the video you refer to, but "bare root" means that you remove all the soil, so that the roots are "bare."

- bob
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Jay tupelo
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« Reply #2 on: December 02, 2012, 07:00 PM »

o okay it seems that he bare roots the tree but there seems to be a little soil on the iner tree. maybe if any one that has seen the video can help may be?
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John Kirby
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« Reply #3 on: December 02, 2012, 07:38 PM »

Jay, I just watched the video, most at 4x, and there is no bare rooting shown because the tree was in good soil. The barerooting would involve using the curved tip tweezers to remove all of the soil from 1/2 of the roots, up under the trunk. The initial preparation is the same as boon shows, bottom, sides, top, then clean out the front half, for example. I will see if I can find a picture and post.
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John Kirby
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« Reply #4 on: December 02, 2012, 07:56 PM »

Here is work Boon and I did in February 2010 on a Shohin JBP I keep out in California. Looks pretty aggressive, and if you aren't used to working trees in small pots, it can be. This tree will be repotted again this winter, the back will be barerooted this year.
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Minogame
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« Reply #5 on: December 02, 2012, 08:03 PM »

When you repot a conifer, and the goal is to change the soil, it is only safe to completely bare root half of the tree.  On a nursery container, or bonsai pot, first confirm the surface level or nebari. You can usually safely remove half of the bottom after the top is confirmed. Remove the bottom carefully, sharp cutting, and maintaining a flat, intact surface to the new potting angle will assist in tying it into the pot. Now to your Q. Sitting the tree upright on the flat bottom surface, begin to remove soil from half of the root ball   all the way to the center of the tree. Correct root conditions as you come to them. On the other half of the root ball, only lightly trim the roots. Doing bare rooting this way, you can safely change the soil over two repots. Once the tree is in proper soil, it will not need to be bare root repotted in this way again.  

This is Black pine technique. Only repot healthy trees. Collected trees may not have fine root growth close to the trunk. Leave these roots long and fold them into the pot.

Q OK ? Am i in trouble?
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Adair M
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« Reply #6 on: December 02, 2012, 09:00 PM »

John,

I saw that tree when I was at Boon's last month.  Cute, cute, cute!
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crust
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« Reply #7 on: December 03, 2012, 09:12 AM »

It always amazes me how even so these trees are proposed to be grown in a soil mix that's at least 50 percent durable aggregates they always appear to be in mostly degraded akadama--at least up close to the trunk. Do you ever pick this stuff out?   
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Jay tupelo
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« Reply #8 on: December 03, 2012, 12:48 PM »

thank you Mr john kurby for the explanation the tree looks WOW. so in the picture boon is barerooting the front half and next winter the back half ?
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Jay tupelo
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« Reply #9 on: December 03, 2012, 12:49 PM »

sorry Kirby
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John Kirby
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« Reply #10 on: December 03, 2012, 10:29 PM »

Not a problem, yes, the back comes this winter- it too will be reduced and cleaned out.

Minogame, well not exactly. The soil breaks down in all trees and over time the tree will need to have all of the old soil removed again, and again, and again. Just not on as aggressive a repotting cycle.

Crust. Understand, biut the large particles remaining, the hyuga and volcanic fall away as the roots are manipulated. The tree in the picture never freezes solid, the soil doesn't freeze, so the breakdown is due to the roots growing into the akadama particles and fracturing them and breaking them down. the picture shows it about as clean as we go on a pine, maybe a light rinse afterwards. Don't think the roots penetrate the particles?  I received a Rocky Mountain Juniper from a friend in Southern texas to rescue. When I got the tree loaded into the back of my truck, the first thing I noticed was that it wan't secured in the pots I wrapped some 4 mm Aluminum wire around the pot and tied to the tree and stabilized it. The following spring I cut the stabilizer wires, cut the tie down wires and lifted the tree out of the massive pot it was in. I had noticed that the tree wasn't as heavy as I thought it might be, when I lifted the tree up, I noticed it had about 4" of a conventional haydite based potting mix, and below the potting mix was a 6" deep layer of styrofoam packing peanuts. Because of the wobble, the roots had not filled the pot, but the roots had aggressively grown down through the bonsai mix and into the peanuts. Interestingly, the roots had grown through the peanuts, not around them, so when you held the tree up, the roots hanging down were all supporting packing peanuts like beads on a string. I imagine the packing peanuts would work just fine, if you had the tree anchored in to the pot so that it would not wobble and break off the new roots.

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Chrisl
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« Reply #11 on: December 04, 2012, 09:33 AM »

Wow, growing thru the peanuts eh?  That's surprising!  Fun story Wink
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boon
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« Reply #12 on: December 04, 2012, 02:46 PM »

John,  thanks for helping. Your information sharing will help raising the Bar for American bonsai.
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boon
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« Reply #13 on: December 04, 2012, 02:50 PM »

Hi Jay,  I hope john has shown you and answer your question.

FYI if your tree is weak do not cut too much root off.
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Minogame
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« Reply #14 on: December 04, 2012, 04:31 PM »

Thanks John for clarifying, there are a few other techniques I skipped, too. Don't follow my remarks over studying directly with an professional!
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