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Author Topic: black pine with a cluster of branches  (Read 4668 times)
Herman
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« Reply #45 on: January 17, 2013, 03:36 AM »

Hello mr Kirby! Smiley

Thnx for the reply and advice, gold as always

Will remove in stages, this made the most sense to me, but wanted to make sure of it.

Will pulling needles on top also help with strengthening the future new leader?

Herman
« Last Edit: January 17, 2013, 03:39 AM by Herman » Logged

John Kirby
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« Reply #46 on: January 17, 2013, 01:40 PM »

Wouldn't hurt to pull the old needles, if anything it will prevent the new leader from being shaded.
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Herman
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« Reply #47 on: January 30, 2013, 05:52 AM »

Will it weaken the top and strengthen the bottom?
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John Kirby
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« Reply #48 on: January 30, 2013, 08:35 AM »

A bit, more of a emergency call to the lower buds to respnd to the threat
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Herman
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« Reply #49 on: March 10, 2013, 10:52 AM »

seeing a lot of roots hitting the inside of the plastic bags>>> none of the layers died back. so i will have 5 new black pines with which i can create some nice small trees, if they survive being potted up...

made a mix of crushed clinker, washed silica sand and leca, added 35% organic material in the form of sieved composted pine bark and milled pine bark

Herman
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Adair M
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« Reply #50 on: March 26, 2013, 08:13 AM »

Herman,

I don't know what clinker is, nor leca.  Your sand, is it a fine sand like sandbox sand?  Or more coarse like cat litter?  The coarser the better.  (Within reason.)

I know we've discussed putting organics in the soil mix, and you've stated it's to help retain water.  I understand why you think that's the way to go.  I'm not going to say it won't work, but I think a better solution is to use an all inorganic mix, and providing a watering system to water the trees.  You can get an inexpensive timer to provide water at specified intervals.  Just a thought...

When are you planning to take the layers?  I'd be conservative.  Maybe take one or two, and leave the rest on the mother tree.  If the first ones survive on their own, then you can separate the rest.  If the first ones die, you can leave the others on longer.  Again, just another thought.

Let us know how it all works out!  Good luck!
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Herman
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« Reply #51 on: March 26, 2013, 09:43 AM »

Hello Adair

The washed silica sand is not fine, its about 3 to 4 mm in diameter.  As for the organics in my soil mix, I will make an experiment with one of the layers and see what plan I can make for water retentive inorganic material , sound better? I've already taken one layer two days ago and planted it into a square plastic pot. I plan to take the others in spring...

O yes, one died, while still on the mother plant, its needles dried up looking like dry lucern...I took it off and inspected the ringbark area, it seems like the cambium tried to grow back, then it started to form roots, but something went wrong with those, because they died back, maybe it was a bit too hot for the roots? The tree stood in full sun...anyhow...others seem fine, and I'm going to leave them on the mother plant until spring.

Adair, clinker is a type of porous clay we use to fire bricks from, here in south africa. I presume it will function a lot like pumice or decomposed granite, LECA stands for lightweigth expanded clay agregate, its very light and very porous. They make it in rotary kilns by mixing sodium salts in with the clay, the sodium burns off leaving pellets of very porous clay. Only problem is that the pellets float, being less dense than water...

There are two products I can use to replace the organics, zeolite or crushed hydroton...will look into it, but I'm more comfortable with my sieved pine bark compost...

Thanx for the reply

Herman
« Last Edit: March 26, 2013, 09:52 AM by Herman » Logged

Adair M
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« Reply #52 on: March 26, 2013, 10:14 AM »

Herman,

Those inorganics sound good.

Sorry about the dead layer.  Pines are notariously hard to layer.
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Herman
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« Reply #53 on: March 26, 2013, 10:45 AM »

Herman,

Those inorganics sound good.

Sorry about the dead layer.  Pines are notariously hard to layer.

That any worked is awesome, I did not expect any to work. So its not a big loss. Thnx for the reply

Herman
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John Kirby
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« Reply #54 on: March 26, 2013, 11:45 AM »

Herman, good deal. Hope they do well. John
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Herman
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« Reply #55 on: March 26, 2013, 04:39 PM »

Thank you Mr Kirby



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Gaffer
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« Reply #56 on: August 11, 2013, 05:20 PM »

Africa
To help break down your soil without repotting I use chicken grit. I put it in a little pile and with a chop stick I corkscrew it into the soil mix. It gets the grit right to the bottom of the pot and soon you have enough in the mix until you can repot in your spring or fall. I was told that there are only 2 varieties  of  jbp that will air layer. Most don't and you might have gone to  a lot of trouble for not. Hope not.
Qualicum Brian
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Herman
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« Reply #57 on: August 28, 2013, 06:00 AM »

Africa
To help break down your soil without repotting I use chicken grit. I put it in a little pile and with a chop stick I corkscrew it into the soil mix. It gets the grit right to the bottom of the pot and soon you have enough in the mix until you can repot in your spring or fall. I was told that there are only 2 varieties  of  jbp that will air layer. Most don't and you might have gone to  a lot of trouble for not. Hope not.
Qualicum Brian

Thanks for the caution although very late Tongue

All air layers are extending their buds in candles, I take this as a good sign.

I also repotted most of my pines into the new mix about a month ago. All seems fine and dandee....

Will update with photos as soon as I can

Herman

I also repotted most of my pines into the new mix, all seems to be going w
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John Kirby
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« Reply #58 on: August 29, 2013, 08:08 AM »

Herman, Glad to hear things are going well. Sounds like you are finding your way through the black pine maze.

Gaffer, Japanese Black Pines can be airlayered fairly routinely , but usually not the way that most of us think of doing. You see old heavily barked ones being airlayered in photographs from Kinbon, not sure I have ever seen one that was produced from a large tree, like we do with Junipers or maples, etc. However, JBP root fairly easily from candle layers. This was first published in the US in Golden Statements about 30 years ago. I think the best presentation on this is done by second generation California Bonsai Grower, George Muranaka. George is a quality guy who has carried on the family tradition of growing Prebonsaiand bonsai and is a regular on ebay. He has a nice pictorial on air layering JBP on his blog: http://muranakabonsainursery.blogspot.com/2012/04/japanese-black-pine-air-layers.html

Hope this helps.

John
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Herman
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« Reply #59 on: September 25, 2013, 11:39 PM »

The update of the three layers that made it Grin
I made an quasi experiment with these...two I placed deep underneath shade netting, and the other I placed so that it would receive direct morning sun and afternoon filtered sun.

The weather is going bonkers over here Huh? Its very early spring and the temps are already rising above 100 f. Shocked

Hope my roots dont cook Wink

The last pic is of a bud just as it started moving about three weeks ago

Herman
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