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Author Topic: Anyone see any potential in this one?  (Read 2684 times)
Adair M
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« on: April 01, 2012, 02:46 PM »

Stopped by the bonsai shop the other day, and tied up against the fence were some JBPs the owner had purchased to become trees for Japanese gardens.  This bad boy was about 7, maybe 8 feet tall.

Not any more.

The long branch is going to go, but I figured the chop was enough stress for one day.  At the point of the chop, the trunk diameter is about the size of the Pepsi can.

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MatsuBonsai
John Callaway
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« Reply #1 on: April 01, 2012, 04:56 PM »

It's going to have a scar.  Smiley

Very nice trunk.  Do they have any more?
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J

Adair M
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« Reply #2 on: April 01, 2012, 05:29 PM »

Actually, they do!  He had about 6.  I liked this one because of the taper between the nebari and the first branch. There was one a bit smaller, but with more movement that would be nice, too.
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nathanbs
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« Reply #3 on: April 01, 2012, 06:09 PM »

thats kind of you to take your tree for a walk by the water. Where are those photos taken?
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bwaynef
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« Reply #4 on: April 01, 2012, 06:29 PM »

I like what I'm imagining under all that growth in the 2nd picture.
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Adair M
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« Reply #5 on: April 01, 2012, 07:49 PM »

water?  I took these pic with the tree sitting on my driveway.  I live on the top of a hill.  Those pics were taken facing NE.  This land was once a cow pasture.  I keep a couple of horses on it now.

Wayne, yeah, I'm thinking pic two is the closest to showing the future front.  tilt it over to the right a little, and it looks even better.  The folliage on the right has one branch about 6 inches long that could be made into a first branch, but what's really cool is that there are 3 or 4 smaller branches just in front of it that are only 2 inches, that could be grown out to be the first branch.

The future apex would be grown out of the tallest branch on the left.  I'll let that grow to fatten, and there are lots of little branches to cut back to when making the second branch and future apex.

And there's little branches on the back.  In fact, there's lots of "furry little branches" all over.  It appears to be a prolific budder, so I probably could cut all the larger branches off, and just work with the little ones, almost like doing a trident maple.

Boon's thread, "A local pine" inspired me for this one.
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Jeff Lahr
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« Reply #6 on: April 02, 2012, 08:58 AM »

Nice texture on the bark. Do you think there will be a problem in reducing the roots on this one?
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nathanbs
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« Reply #7 on: April 02, 2012, 11:34 AM »

wow beautiful view from your driveway, looks like a park, sorry it looked like there was water in the distance
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Adair M
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« Reply #8 on: April 02, 2012, 08:00 PM »

Jeff,

It will probably take several years to reduce the roots down to a bonsai pot.

I probably could get away with cutting away the bottom half of the root ball now.  Especiallysince  I removed 90% of the foliage, there's less for the roots to support.

There are two possible apex branches, each about 3/4 inch in diameter where they emerge from the trunk.  One is more likely to be the future trunk line, but I'd like to see it take off and get to be about an inch, maybe more to make the taper change a little more believable.

But, I really haven't messed with the roots, yet.

I don't know if it was supposed to be any particular variety, but it's got good genetics for bonsai:  it appears to produce a lot of branches, and back buds, and the needles were only 2.25 inches long.  Very dark green and sturdy needles.
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Adair M
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« Reply #9 on: April 16, 2012, 04:46 PM »

I think I've figured out the future front...

The photos, even with a flash on, do not really show all the little 1 and 2 inch long little branches I plan to use for primary branches.

On the fourth pic, I've circled in black, on the left where I'll develop the first branch, red the second branch which is right at the base of the new trunk line  in yellow.  The orange arrow is a sacrifice branch that will be allowed to grow up and put on some wood to develop the trunk above the chop.

I'm really lucky to have so many little twigs right at the trunk. 

The plan is to let the afore mentioned sacrifice grow unimpeded and simulateously develop the primary branches.

Next spring, start working on the root ball.  I'll have to build a box and start reducing the height of the rootball.  There are a number of circular roots from where it was uppotted as it grew, so the nebari is a question.  I've scratched around to see what there is to see, and the soil around the trunk is very dense.  I might start trying to insert a chopstick and  making some holes, and backfilling with some boons mix as close to the trunk as I can.  I've put some fertilizer there, too.
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bwaynef
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« Reply #10 on: April 17, 2012, 07:42 AM »

On the fourth pic, I've circled in black, on the left where I'll develop the first branch, red the second branch which is right at the base of the new trunk line  in yellow.  The orange arrow is a sacrifice branch that will be allowed to grow up and put on some wood to develop the trunk above the chop.

I think the orange arrow ought to be the eventual leader, with the yellow just below (or to the left of) it the sacrifice.

Regardless, this one looks like it will be fun.
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Adair M
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« Reply #11 on: April 17, 2012, 08:04 AM »

wayne,

Interesting, I'll have a look.  The orange leader is behind, so the scar wouldn't show.  I don't intend for this tree to be any  taller than the orange line is now.  I'll let the sacrifice leader get taller, but the finished height will be about where it is now.

Did you see on Jonas' blog where he took home a similiar project?  His has far better nebari.  It will be interesting to see what he does with his.
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Adair M
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« Reply #12 on: April 17, 2012, 08:17 AM »

Wayne, here's a closeup of the two leaders.  The verticle leader is the one I picked for a sacrifice.  The new apex would be the branch to the left.  I picked it as the eventual apex (leader) because it has a shorter internode than the verticle leader, and because it would put the scar on the back.

Cheers!

Adair
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John Kirby
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« Reply #13 on: April 18, 2012, 07:09 AM »

Good start, 10 years to good bonsai (may be faster in your climate). Next spring you can get this tree into a big bonsai pot, I might have done it this year when you did the cut down, but that is just one approach. The issue will be finding where the nebari is relative to the first few roots you see. I might suggest that you cut down the pot and take the surface soil down 2-3-4 inches, exposing the surface roots and "combing them out" away from the trunk. then replace the top soil with a medium coarse bonsai soil. place a little sphagnum around the trunk at the nebari line (like 1-2" from the trunk out). This will help with a couple of things, one it will get the nebari cleaned and starting to do some new growth, get you roots on the surface fixed and get you prepared for the root cut down and 50% barerooting that will need to occur next spring. Then find a big cheap pot to use next year. Looks like a fun, fun project. John
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mcpesq817
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« Reply #14 on: April 18, 2012, 11:31 AM »

Nice JBP Smiley  I've been working on a similarly sized JBP from nursery material for the past year and a half.  Unfortunately, I've got long lanky branches that I need to push buds closer to the trunk on - or possibly graft on new branches.  It's amazing that you have such tight budding so close to the trunk that low on the tree.  Looking forward to your future updates.
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