Author Topic: 3 Gallon Japanese Black Pine  (Read 1506 times)

BonsaiEngineer1493

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3 Gallon Japanese Black Pine
« on: January 12, 2013, 12:23 PM »
Hey Forum,

Lets suppose I acquired a 3 gallon Japanese Black Pine. With respect to the season, what kind of maintenance should be applied to the tree before I repot it? 
 

Adair M

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Re: 3 Gallon Japanese Black Pine
« Reply #1 on: January 12, 2013, 01:21 PM »
Raw stock?  You could prune any obvious branches that "Need Removing" such as those on the inside of curves, etc.  If there are lots of whorls where there is a central leader and 5 branches going out in all directions, you could start to eliminate the ones you don't want.  (Keeping the whorl will create reverse taper.)  If the trunk needs to be chopped back, this is a good time.

Fall/winter is usually a good time to wire.  Now, you're in NewYork. I live in the South, so, you might want to check with your fellow NewYorkers about that.  JBP are reasonably cold hardy, but less so than other pines.  I would heel the pot in.

Also, look at the ends of all the branches.  Reduce to two twigs.  Especially at the top.  The trick with JBP is to keep the lower branches strong.  You do this by pruning the top harder.

Remember it takes about 5 years to transform raw stock to a decent looking JBP bonsai.  It's better to be conservative and not do too much at one time.

I very much recommend that you get Boon's DVDs on JBP.  They show in detail exactly what to do in each season.
 

Adair M

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Re: 3 Gallon Japanese Black Pine
« Reply #2 on: January 12, 2013, 07:48 PM »
Nick,

I got your PM, and that tree is from a reputable wholesaler/retailer.  They're near Memphis, so while it is 'winter' there, it's not nearly as cold as you are in NYC.

All those trees are decent raw stock.  Once you start wiring the branches down, it will open up the interior which will aid in budding back.

The soil they use is terrible.  It holds way too much water.  It will take several repottings over the next couple of years to completely get rid of it.

The low branches, if you look closely, are largely bare of green near the trunk.  That's why you need to wire then down, and get them exposed to the sun.

Begin the summer de-candling, and that will stimulate back budding.

That's a nice enough tree that you will enjoy the process of turning the tree into a bonsai.

Do a search on this forum and look for a thread entitled, "Turning a bush into a bonsai" (or something like that)in the Japanese Black Pine subcategory.   It chronicles my tree from that same source, and you can see how it evolves.  (I didn't buy mine online, but from the local bonsai shop.  He purchased it from the same place.)  Mine was a little larger.

You should have fun with it.

If you get it, take lots of before, during, and after photos!