YouTube Bonsai Videos

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somegeek:
I subscribed to this guy and have watched all of his videos.  As a bonsai newbie, I've gleaned a lot of good info.  This guy has done a good job with his videos.

http://www.youtube.com/user/chasnsx

somegeek

johng:
I also enjoy Charles's video and appreciate the effort he goes to make them!!

John

boon:
Those movies are very very bad.   If you want to learn how to do good bonsai.  Do not follow his way of doing bonsai.
have a good bonsai jouney,  take a different road.
Sincerely,
Boon

somegeek:
Quote from: boon on October 02, 2009, 11:24 AM

Those movies are very very bad.   If you want to learn how to do good bonsai.  Do not follow his way of doing bonsai.
have a good bonsai jouney,  take a different road.
Sincerely,
Boon




Care to elaborate?   ???

rockm:
I  don't intend this as an attack, but only a warning that this might not be the best source of info.

I watched the "Fall Repotting" video. While I applaud the enthusiasm, I would never take these vids as gospel on bonsai know how.

In the video I watched. I noticed more than a few things that troubled me.

The soil mix is wrong and potentially lethal (potting soil is NEVER appropriate with a juniper, or much else for that matter). "All purpose" sand contains fine particles that will clog drainage--combining it with potting soil multiplies the clogging factor exponentially.

I would never use a root hook with more than a single tine. Multiple tines shred root masses. Single tines are best. Simple bamboo chopsticks can work well if you can't find or can't afford an appropriate root hook.

The pot he's putting the plant into is far less appropriate for the tree artistically and horticulturally. It's too deep and overpowers that skinny trunk, while at the same time complicates drainage even more--deeper pots stay  wetter at the bottom and drier at the top than shallower containers. That could spell trouble with overwatering.

The soil the plant is in shows why the top growth is so spindly and weak. It's mush. It sticks together in a wettish looking block. The soil has decomposed to the point it's a mess...Decent bonsai soil should crumble to so extent even after years in a pot. It should  be "friable" as it's termed. That soil mass is dense and airless.

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