Author Topic: Young Black Pines and Ramification?  (Read 9438 times)

subnet_rx

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Young Black Pines and Ramification?
« on: February 01, 2011, 01:28 PM »
I have a japanese black pine that I bought a couple of years ago.  The trunk isn't anywhere near what I'd like it to be, but what I'm noticing is as the branches come out, there's not a lot of ramification.  Should I be concerned about this at this stage, or should I just let this tree grow for another 5 years or so to get the trunk size needed, then start training for more ramification and foliage closer to the trunk?
 

garywood

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Re: Young Black Pines and Ramification?
« Reply #1 on: February 01, 2011, 01:44 PM »
Sub, growing black pines is one of the most challenging things we do in bonsai. One thing I constantly teach is have a plan. Growing bonsai, even doing everything right takes a long time and not having a plan or vision of what you want to achieve leaves one wasting time that could be better used. A photo of the tree would give everyone a chance to see what should be the priority in training. Sorry but no general advice without info on strength, growing conditions,feeding and so on.
Wood
http://thingsofwood-gary.blogspot.com/
 

subnet_rx

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Re: Young Black Pines and Ramification?
« Reply #2 on: February 01, 2011, 05:19 PM »
Ok, thanks, I looked around for a recent photo when I posted, but surprisingly I don't have one.  I'll try to add one to this thread asap. 
 

subnet_rx

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Re: Young Black Pines and Ramification?
« Reply #3 on: February 02, 2011, 12:05 AM »
This is an older picture, but it kind of shows what I'm trying to explain.  You can see how the branches only have needles near the end.  Today's tree is just a more exaggerated version of this.

 

garywood

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Re: Young Black Pines and Ramification?
« Reply #4 on: February 02, 2011, 03:02 PM »
Sub, it looks like a graft, possibly one of the 'nishikis'. You don't say what kind of tree you want, short fat, tall skinny, movement, taper,overall size. When you grow a tree it's imperative to think about these things in able to use everything that's there to further it's development and take off everything that will cause problems later. I know that without experience these things are hard to get a handle on but when getting some direction all of these things need to be addressed. Your goal should be to know what every needle, bud, twig, branch or root is doing and why and what these will be in 1 - 2 - 5 years down the road. Growing is a very deliberate process building a tree one step at a time by prioritizing the steps. That's about as much as i can say without a recent photo and your plans.
Wood
 

akeppler

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Re: Young Black Pines and Ramification?
« Reply #5 on: February 20, 2011, 02:22 AM »
While Gary is offering sound advice, and I would follow that without exception. The only thing I can add is that without pruning and candle maintenance, it will never fork. Pines will continue to follow a straight path, year after year after year. Cut one of those branches straight thru in the middle of the needles and watch what happens in the spring, you will be amazed.