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Author Topic: What is next in your bonsai plans  (Read 1434 times)
JRob
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« on: January 20, 2013, 08:07 PM »

Good Evening All,

Yesterday was a glorious day in STL (except that is for the passing of Stan the Man). Sunny,with no breeze, we reached a high of 65- a early harbinger to the warmth of spring and the thawing of the ground. Next month we'll begin our bonsai repotting in full swing and lets hope we do not have a repeat of last years early heat to shorten the transplanting window again.

Long before I read Aldo Leopold, Henry David Thoreau or Wendell Berry as a young boy I had always been fascinated with trees. Maybe that is why my first degree was in biology with concentrations in botany and ornithology. Bonsai seemed a logical progression of that love affair in mid-life. I am under no illusion that I will see my late life plantings of trees in pots reach their maturity. Every year I begin a couple new ones because I can envision what promise they hold in their young trunks. Hopefully I will have a wonderful collection to pass on to my son who has embraced the art form and hopefully the trees will remain in the family for several generations.

I am looking forward with great anticipation to this next growing season. Aren't you? Why not share some of your plans as our nights are filled with the dreams of trees yet to be.

JRob
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dre
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« Reply #1 on: January 20, 2013, 10:13 PM »

i'm really looking forward to this coming growing season. i have Owen Reich coming to work on some trees with me. some grafting on a san jose juniper. repotting a very nice needle juniper i have into a one of a kind Ron lang pot (he even said he hasn't made a pot like this yet). and a whole lot of general repotting for some larches and yews. but most definitely am looking forward to this coming growing season
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MatsuBonsai
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« Reply #2 on: January 21, 2013, 06:38 PM »

With the impending single digit cold predicted for tonight, I am eagerly awaiting spring. 

Owen will be stopping by sometime in the next few months (I forget when).  Will be fun to see what he can do this time with the trees I've selected for him, and/or release him to pick the one(s) he would like to work on.  Kiddo prevented me from doing all but the most essential last year, so there's plenty to do.

Looking forward to my first trip to Portland in October for the Artisans Cup.

From the few pictures I've seen of BIB 14 (since I wasn't able to attend myself), I'm really looking forward to BIB 15 next year (already cleared with the wife Wink ).
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Adair M
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« Reply #3 on: January 21, 2013, 08:18 PM »

Owen is going to be in Atlanta this weekend for a workshop and the monthly Atlanta Bonsai Society meeting.  The workshop is going to be a "repotting" workshop.  Hmmm... It's a little early for my trees:  JBP, JWP, Satsuki and Zelkova.  I'm clueless what to bring for the workshop. 

The following week, I'm heading out to Boon's for the winter Intensive.  I'll get to see the Tree of the Month again!

And, Matsu, I'll get to see the pine in your avatar pic to see if it survived the work I did on it last fall!
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Brian Van Fleet
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« Reply #4 on: January 21, 2013, 10:48 PM »

This last year has been strange; lots of pots, but haven't bought a tree in over a year now.  My list:

Lots to repot this year, several trees going into different pots which will change the "landscape" a little.
Bjorn will be back in March, looking forward to his return.
Several trees I've been growing out may just be ready for pots, others I'll just be eager to chop back and start the next section.
Collecting out in western SD in May.
Ryan will be here in November, looking forward to meeting him...have a big shimpaku from Brent I've been saving for the occasion.
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dre
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« Reply #5 on: January 21, 2013, 11:11 PM »

from the sounds of things owen is going to be very busy till he goes back to japan
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John Kirby
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« Reply #6 on: January 21, 2013, 11:32 PM »

Adair, the tree is alive and well, as of Saturday. When are you going to be Boon's?

I am looking forward to keep on keeping on.
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Don Dunn
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« Reply #7 on: January 22, 2013, 03:46 AM »

As a beginner I have a few things lined up. I know you guys will probably say I'm nuts but I purchased a couple of Aleppo Pine 6 Italian Stone Pines all in one gallon pots from Home Depot at 75% off or $2.40 each and 6 Italian Stones in 4 " pots at $1.28 each. I know they are difficult and most people don't think they make good Bonsai. I am aware of all that and I am using them just to practice on. Seeing as I had never really styled a pine before I figure this is great practice. I have worked on three of them so far and enjoyed it very much. I have cut off some branches that I should not have and made other mistakes but I've learned from each one. I'm not destroying a nice JBP or JWP. The Aleppo pines are very leggy long thin branches but lots of budding. I have not found much about them as Bonsai. I do hold out a little hope for the Italian Stone Pines. I read Ernie Kuo's article in Bonsai Today issue # 59 and every thing I could find on the internet. I do not plan on letting them get in the way of my real Bonsai and if they are a bust then into the garbage with them. The 4" pots I want to try a forest with. I planted them and three of the one gallons in the ground to see how well they will grow.
I am studying every thing I find and trying to soak it up. I am going to try and air layer a few of  my Japanese Maples, Red woods, oaks and I hope to find a good Elm tree. I have probably 300 maple seeds in the refer along with some Olive and Crabapple seeds.  I will be taking cuttings from my maples to stick for rooting. Other than that I don't have any thing going on.
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Charles Willis
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« Reply #8 on: January 23, 2013, 11:46 PM »

For me the two bigs ones are:
1. Obtain and start developing better material.
2. Join a bonsai club.

I only became interested in bonsai last spring and I didn't have anyone to guide me. I did a bunch of reading on the internet and checked out all the books at the library about bonsai. I really wish I had been able to talk to someone experience, but the closest club is an hour away and I don't have a car at the moment. Now that I know a little more about bonsai I think the club experience would really help me out even more than it would have when I was first interested. Before there would have been a lot of advice on just keeping the trees alive, but now I think I could really get help on styling and developing my trees.

Most of the material I got last year happened to be very poor quality for bonsai purposes. The rest died due to plain ignorance on caring for them. In the fall I did pick up some decent tropical trees (willow leaf ficus and ficus microcarpa), but I had to keep them indoors under lights. It will be nice to finally get them outdoors where they can really grow and allow me to style them.

Aside from that, I'd like to get a couple junipers and pines to start learning how to manage coniferous trees. Also work on wiring. It's a lot harder than it looks!  Tongue
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Owen Reich
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« Reply #9 on: January 24, 2013, 12:44 AM »

Owen is going to be in Atlanta this weekend for a workshop and the monthly Atlanta Bonsai Society meeting.  The workshop is going to be a "repotting" workshop.  Hmmm... It's a little early for my trees:  JBP, JWP, Satsuki and Zelkova.  I'm clueless what to bring for the workshop. 

 

Not sure what's up with the repotting thing either Adair.  But, afternoon will involve evaluation of trees for improvement.  Morning probably will too.  I'm bringing a few bonsai in to discuss aesthetics and attention to details.  It'll be fun.
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Adair M
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« Reply #10 on: January 24, 2013, 03:28 AM »

Owen,

When I spoke with the guy in charge of the workshop and meeting, he said his trident maples were pushing growth. He lives in the city. I'm up north closer to the mountains, and we're having hard freezes!

I'll bring my satsuki, zelkova, and a couple of pines, and you can choose what you want to work with.

That is, assuming the roads are clear. They've been predicting rain, freezing rain, and snow for NE Ga. That's where I am. Not so much for Atlanta.


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Judy
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« Reply #11 on: January 24, 2013, 06:50 AM »

I'm planning on doing a lot of repotting this spring (when it gets here...) as I'm changing over to a different soil mix.  Also building a new watering system this year, and a new "full sun" display area.

I also joined a club, went to one meeting, and hope their plans to do a study group actually happens.  I'm going to try to make as many meetings as my schedule allows, but already can't go to the grafting class (boooo!).  Not sure how much I'll learn at this club, but I'm trying to keep my mind open. So far... hmmmm. 
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augustine
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« Reply #12 on: January 24, 2013, 01:56 PM »

I have a couple of years of experience and have also decided to buy and work with better stock. I joined a bonsai club last year

I collected a lot of plants and have since put a bunch in the ground as part of my landscaping. Still have others to plant when the weather breaks. Others may go to club members, for trade or as club raffle items.

I do, however, have some stock that may have potential. Here are the highlights.

Shimpaku - being styled and has a nice root system from being container grown. Design help came from my club members. Repotted last year and will not repot 'til 2014.

Sabina Juniper - 3 gallon plant with large trunk and gnarly bark - being styled and will be repotted in the spring. Came from regular nursery so roots will take a number of seasons and the foliage is leggy. I trimmed a bit in late summer and started wiring  in search of a good design. Will need design help from my club members.

Pyracantha Red Elf - 2 gallon plant - from regular nursery and will need root work, repot and a bit of pruning.

Japanese Quince - have "Double Take" and Contorted White cultivars. All need repotting this year. These are very cool and easy to grow.

JBP Mikawa - 3 gallon from Martha Meehan. Need help with this. Going to a pine seminar conducted by Mr. Julian Adams on Sunday and need to plan a good path. Seminar is just another benefit of being a member of the Baltimore Bonsai Club.

Pinus Strobiformis - will pot up and allow to grow.

Acer Campestre Compacta - needs a repot and coming along nicely. Nice trunk movement. I hope it will become a sort of "free style/natural looking" broom design a la Mr. Walter Pall. Excellent stock from Brent Walston.

Dwarf Lilac Palibin - bought two, balled and burlapped, at year end clearance. Both have about 2.5 inch trunks. Put one in the ground and other was slip potted into a large container. The container plant will be lightly pruned after flowering, nothing else will be done in 2013.

Collected local material - several Carpinus Caroliana, Virginia Pines, Oriental Bittersweet and large trunked English Ivy (that looks like a funky penjing) - these will rest for several seasons.

Have a few other small plants (like Acer Palmatum, Ulmus P. and native Hackberry) that will need repotting this season and are growing out happily. We have lots of room outside.

Any future purchases will be of good quality and size.

At this point in bonsai, I am finding my way and having a good time. The bonsai hobby is something that I can enjoy at home and that is important because my daughter is 16 (and often needs a driver) and my son is 11 and likes to have Dad around.

Best regards,

Augustine
Central MD - 7A

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Don Dunn
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« Reply #13 on: January 24, 2013, 05:15 PM »

kennedyMarx
I joined a club a couple of months ago and at first was a little disappointed. since that time I have been to four meetings so far and I am getting acquainted to several of the member. Don't expect them to go out of their way to met you, you will probably have to be the one that takes that step. I just listen and when I get a chance I ask questions and ask If I can set and watch while they style their tree. That gives you a good chance to get to know them and learn from folks that know what they are doing. But you and I can learn even from those that have only been doing Bonsai for a couple of years.
Find out if the club has a library and they probably do. If so check out the Bonsai Today Magazines. They are loaded with amazing articles. I purchased 15 last month, 75% off and have made a list of book numbers 1-100 so far with my word processor. Each meeting I take back a stack of  Bonsai Today and check out more. I mark my list with the ones I have already read so I can keep track. This gives me plenty of reading material until the next meeting or show.
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Owen Reich
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« Reply #14 on: January 24, 2013, 09:19 PM »

Pruned Boxwoods with new flushes on them and got sprayed with water when cutting into a Japanese maple today.  Reporting in ATL is looking somehow ok right now.

So much for a nice long collecting season  Angry
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