Author Topic: Importing  (Read 2362 times)

Intriguedbybonsai

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Importing
« on: March 13, 2012, 02:28 AM »
Has anyone here done it? I know it's obviously expensive, and if so, what price range are we talking about here? What do I need to know about collection permits, and pest quarantines? Does anyone know of a good website, or dealer that I could check out?
 

Owen Reich

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Re: Importing
« Reply #1 on: March 13, 2012, 05:22 AM »
I clients locate bonsai and bring them up to speed on current rules and restrictions (and there are a lot of them).  The process is getting more and more complicated.  However, it is possible.  The first step is to find an importer in America.  I don't know all o them especially on the West Coast.  Whichever importer you choose to work with will get you up to speed on the fees, species allowed, post-entry quarantine times, etc.  Some species can be brought in directly if Pre-quarantined the proper amount of time (generally 2-3 years) in Japan.  Certain species have more hoops to jump through than others due to their history of hosting different insects, viruses, fungi, bacteria, and nematodes.  Being in California may add some more hoops too.  I'm not up on their laws but have heard it's more strict. 

Once you find an import house to potentially work with, feel free to email me (owenbonsai@me.com) with any further questions.  My only advice at this point is make sure the tree(s) you get are really nice.
 

JRob

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Re: Importing
« Reply #2 on: March 13, 2012, 06:03 AM »
As Owen stated legal importing is a complex process. Two locations I deal with that import and have licensed quarantine houses are Brussels Bonsai in Memphis and Satsuki Bonsai-en in St. Louis. Two weekends ago when I was at Brussels they had some really nice material in their quarantine area and Satsuki Bonsai -en always has a nice selection of imported satsuki. Not sure where you are located but if you can get to either it is worth the trip. Also there is good material both domestic and imported available at many of the bonsai nurseries around the country. Where have you been checking? By the way imported is not a shoe in for either good or great material each and tree needs to be judged on its own strengths.

JRob
 

Vulcan

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Re: Importing
« Reply #3 on: March 13, 2012, 09:14 AM »
It's a tough question because you have to balance out what you would wish to import in conjunction with the costs. The outlay of $$$ has to be weighed with the actual worth of the tree. In other words, check around and see what you can purchase as far as species native to North America and compare that with the same cost for an import.

 You're really not going to get the premium Japanese bonsai imported because the Japanese generally don't sell them for export. From what I understand much of what is imported are either seconds or thirds, yet those "seconds" or "thirds" can be really nice to say the least.

Do you have any specific species you are interested in?
 

Intriguedbybonsai

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Re: Importing
« Reply #4 on: March 13, 2012, 12:25 PM »
I did find this site however. http://www.nebonsai.com/mm5/merchant.mvc?Screen=ABOUT They sell about 30 per month.

 I would love to get a hold of a really good pine. Not a pre-bonsai( I already have a couple of pre-bonsai), but something that is well established.
 

rockm

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Re: Importing
« Reply #5 on: March 13, 2012, 12:42 PM »
 "I would love to get a hold of a really good pine"

How much do you want to spend? That's the bottom line. A "good" mostly finished imported Japanese Black Pine will run you probably around $2,000. A "Really good" imported JBP will be about $3,000-$5,000.

If you get one, do you know how to maintain it? They require specific understanding of pruning, bud pinching, etc. to adequately maintain. They are also not very forgiving in the repotting department-- a mistake with a major branch pruning or overly engergetic root pruning will kill them.

Just being a little realistic...

There are some imports on this page, but they're not recently imported:
http://www.thegrowinggrounds.com/gallery/gallery.htm
 

scottroxburgh

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Re: Importing
« Reply #6 on: March 14, 2012, 02:27 AM »
You're in CA, talk to Boon, he has some great pines IN the country!
 

Intriguedbybonsai

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Re: Importing
« Reply #7 on: March 14, 2012, 03:38 AM »
Boon is about an 8 hour drive from my location. ;D  I would love the opportunity to meet with him one of these days.
 

John Kirby

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Re: Importing
« Reply #8 on: March 14, 2012, 07:52 AM »
Sign up for an intensive, gets you up to Hayward and allows you to see and work on the trees. I wish I lived 8 hrs away by car. I usually do the 10+/- hrs by plane, or 4 days driving. And it is worth the trip. John
 

scottroxburgh

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Re: Importing
« Reply #9 on: March 16, 2012, 01:06 AM »
I live 22,000km from Boon (Australia) and I travelled to Hayward for an intensive, it was the best bonsai experience I have ever had!

I'd LOVE to live 8 hours from Boon!

Sign up, you won't regret it, and you'll learn the best techniques to keep big the $$$ bonsai!
 

Owen Reich

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Re: Importing
« Reply #10 on: March 17, 2012, 12:10 AM »
Others have brought up some good points about buying natives, in-country produced Asian tree species, and the costs associated with importing.  If I had $100 for every person I've walked through import policy, I would be rich.  I help clients find high quality material that is not readily available in America.  The costs are fairly high to import and often can double the price of the tree.  The comment about 2-3rd tier quality material being exported is half true in my opinion.  I think exporting younger trees to America is safer though they are not as impressive.  If they have a good nebari and trunk line, they may be worth the added expense.   Also, importers take a risk that every plant in a shipment could get burned if the wrong pest is found.  It's very tough situation.  However, you can't fast-track quality so if you want 200 year old Japanese maple, you buy it from Japan. 
 

Vulcan

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Re: Importing
« Reply #11 on: March 17, 2012, 10:07 AM »
If anyone knows, how difficult is it to obtain a photosanitary certificate? I know you would need one from the USDA, but would one also be necessary for state and possibly local authorities? From what I understand, one needs to build an approved quarantine structure.

Any thoughts or experiences???

John
 

John Kirby

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Re: Importing
« Reply #12 on: March 17, 2012, 11:34 AM »
You can't get one as an individual. You have to apply, get a preliminary permit, build your structure, get inspected, get final permit and then set up the import parameters. Then you need to find someone who can act as your agent, buy the trees, prep them for shipment, ship, receive, inspect, etc. You have to be a licensed nursery. I would suggest trying one of the set up groups who do this for a fee- Brussel's, Dave Kreutz (not sure if he does this for others still) or NE Bonsai. Good luck. John