Author Topic: The proper chop technique: (a request)  (Read 3554 times)

akeppler

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Re: The proper chop technique: (a request)
« Reply #15 on: August 18, 2013, 11:38 AM »
Any technique on a trident will heal given enough time. Thats just the nature of the way they grow.

To heal a chop say 1 inch across takes about 5 years to really have it close completely. Even blogs like Peters do not have enough pictures or history of the sequence to be of any use. What you need is a pictorial taken from the beginnig to the end of the job with yearly documentation.

Most people do not document their work or even take pictures period. There are a few of us out there and I have lots of sequence shots on tridents but not spcifically what you are after. I am close though. Maybe next year.
 

bwaynef

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Re: The proper chop technique: (a request)
« Reply #16 on: August 18, 2013, 05:29 PM »
Any technique on a trident will heal given enough time.

With the exception of Ginkgos, I'm reasonably certain, given enough time, most trees will heal a wound.  I'm primarily concerned with the work that needs to be done after the chop and before everything's healed that would yield a new section of trunk that forms a believable transition.  I referenced an article @ bonsai journal that goes into some detail.  I was wondering how other people deal with this.
 

akeppler

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Re: The proper chop technique: (a request)
« Reply #17 on: August 18, 2013, 10:37 PM »
Yes I have read this many times. I too can draw, drawing and actual practise is way different.
 

bwaynef

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Re: The proper chop technique: (a request)
« Reply #18 on: August 19, 2013, 08:39 AM »
Yes I have read this many times. I too can draw, drawing and actual practise is way different.

I can't tell if we're saying the same thing or not.  To clarify, while I appreciate the article and the renderings, I'd prefer advice from someone who's done it before ...preferably with pictures.

Barring that, I've taken pictures of what I've done and asked for feedback.  I'll try to follow up with these trees at meaningful times and see how I've done.
 

CaseyC

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Re: The proper chop technique: (a request)
« Reply #19 on: August 25, 2013, 02:00 PM »
This is my 6 year old 9 tree Maple Forest that is due for pruning at the end of Sept..  Whatcha guys think??
 

Leo in NE Illinois

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Re: The proper chop technique: (a request)
« Reply #20 on: August 27, 2013, 11:12 AM »

Barring that, I've taken pictures of what I've done and asked for feedback.  I'll try to follow up with these trees at meaningful times and see how I've done.

On all of the trees you pictured, my thought is that you have a bulge, too much wood leaving a stump. For a couple, to clean up and heal to disappear, you have to take off the lower heal of the cut, making it more acute angle. I would go back an using a saw, re-cut most of your chops. Take off thin Wedge shaped piece for each, creating a sharper angle. For some you only have to take maybe 1/4 inch. For a couple, looks like you may have to take off more, but its hard to gauge size from photos.

Colin Lewis taught (if I remember correctly) to make sure there is no ridge or lip along the outer edges of the cut, there should be no ridge of wood to prevent the bark from rolling over to cover the wound. Second, leave a slight mound in the center of the wound. Slight is key, 1/8 inch is all that is needed, little more or less is not a problem. Just don't want a concave dish. Bark has a harder time closing a depression. He suggested taking a knife and removing any bark, take it back to green cambium, the rolling edge of the healing bark if it formed any hard dry mature bark. Want to keep the bark flowing, rolling over the scar. Carving yearly keeps the healing edge active. Apply cut past to rolling edge after re-wounding. Peter Tea's blog discusses this more completely. Also check Colin Lewis's website. It might be tucked in his articles there.

One analogy that comes to my (slightly defective) mind. You don't want the chop wound to have an outer edge like a meteorite crater. That lip of dead wood around the outer edge of the chop will create a barrier to healing. You do want the uprise toward center of the wound. The bark will flow up the slope quicker than filling a concave dish.
« Last Edit: August 27, 2013, 11:18 AM by Leo in NE Illinois »
 

Leo in NE Illinois

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Re: The proper chop technique: (a request)
« Reply #21 on: August 27, 2013, 11:23 AM »
One more thought. You need to let escape branches grow above the chops to get the diameter needed to get a nice, smooth transition. I'm sure you plan to do this, but stating it anyway for the benefit of those that didn't know.
 

Neli

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Re: The proper chop technique: (a request)
« Reply #22 on: October 02, 2013, 01:02 PM »
The Japanese use a technique where they cut a wedge on a branch or trunk, and let it start healing before they cut the rest.
Another technique is to leave bark,  which is bent over the cut, covering it, and taped and kept moist.
A friend uses clay lump plastered on large celtis cuts and they heal very well, and fast.